Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/16/2002 4:54:00 PM EST
Im going to be submitting plans for a garage i'm going to be building onto my house. I already got the zoning laws, and planed it accordingly. I have a layout drawing of the proposed building on my property with distances from boundries/centerline of street/and i included the existing building(my house). I also have plans drawn up of the foundation with a cutaway of the footing/cinderblock meeting. A cutaway showing the slab floor, with wire mesh and gravel. Plans for all 4 walls including the height of all the headers, lumber sizes, distances between beams, ect.. A layout of the rafter design with what size boards im using. And a drawing showing the rafter spacing and the boards im using to connect the rafters to eachother. My question is do i need anything else that anyone knows of? This will be my first submission of plans and would like it to go smooth. I know the laws are different everywhere, but any advise is appreciated, i'm in Isle of Wight County, VA if that helps. Theres no plumbing at this time or electrical(im probally gonna contract that out once i build the garage). Thanks
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:09:05 PM EST
You mention boundaries, but what about easments? That is in the back and front of my property I can't build anything because the city owns it or can tear it up whenever they want. I don't know if they do that on the sides of property, or if you have enough not to worry about. Also you should consider electric, gas, water runs on where you put it. In otherwords it might be better on the other side of your house instead, just saying you should look at how far you have to run things. And you say buliding onto, but are you actually going to connect it to the inside, or just make a walk way? I would think that might be easier, and would make it better in that you don't get fumes into the house and it isn't noisy if you plan on working on stuff in the garage.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:23:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/16/2002 5:24:00 PM EST by Glock31]
Are you doing this for a carpenter to follow or does the city require it for the permit? I thought my town sucked since it required a building permit for basically everything, technically even if you wanted to put down new flooring [shock]. Needless to say, I live out of the city so as long as I follow the subdivision restrictions, i'm good.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:29:42 PM EST
yes i accounted for the easments, the only one is on the street, and the building laws only measure from the centerline of the street. The part im connecting it to has an outside door already, that is going to be a door into the garage when im done. I pretty much took everything into consideration and its where i want it, i just want to make sure i have all the drawings and info they need. And these are just plans to get the permit, i'll be doing the work myself, they just want to make sure i'm not doing a crappy job or anything that's gonna fall down and kill me in the first good storm i guess.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:33:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By SKSBoy: Im going to be submitting plans for a garage i'm going to be building onto my house. I already got the zoning laws, and planed it accordingly. I have a layout drawing of the proposed building on my property with distances from boundries/centerline of street/and i included the existing building(my house).
View Quote
How did you verify the boundaries/lot lines/right-of-way of the street? Did you get a survey? If you want a truly professional presentation, I'd advise a survey. A dickbrain school teacher in my town decided to add on to his house. He put out some stakes and called the town public works director out to inspect. The public works dude gave him a verbal "OK" to proceed. The dickbrain goes ahead and it's later discovered he encroached on the sidewalk which was never installed. The town council debated making him tear down the addition! Finally wiser heads prevailed and he got a zoning variance request approved. If he'd had the survey, he'd never have gotten in trouble.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 6:30:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/16/2002 6:36:32 PM EST by SKSBoy]
yep, already have the survey, i just closed on my house like a month ago so it's a recent survey (may i think). I got all my distances from it, im adding a copy of the survey to the submission also. And thanks to my 10 drafting classes in Jr. High/High School (no joke) the plans look pretty good in my opinion. edit. im zoned RAC (Rural Agricultural) so i dont have many things to worry about.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 3:21:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/17/2002 3:28:57 PM EST by joe_c]
Usually, the building department permit application forms tell you what and how many copies of plans must be submitted. Sometimes, you can get to talk or meet with the plan examiner before making the real submission to iron out any major omissions. It sounds like you have most of it down, although it's hard to judge without seeing the drawings if they are indeed complete. Do you have elevation views of all sides of the exterior? Include the proposed wall materials (siding, sheathing, insulation, etc.) and roofing and flashing materials on the wall sections. There should not be exposed wood framing on the wall between the garage and living space - it should be insulated and have fire-rated sheetrock on both sides. The (proposed) door between garage and living space should also be fire-resistant (metal clad or solid wood). There should be at least one step up from the garage floor slab to the living space (to keep heavier-than-air exhaust and gasoline vapors from entering). Make sure the grading outside of the proposed garage works so you don't wind up with water ponding against the foundation walls (or slab if no basement). I don't know what types of soil conditions are characteristic of that area, so you should be careful of any difficult conditions (clays, groundwater, etc.) that require more than a simple footing below the frost line. In some places, the plans must be stamped by a registered architect "RA" or licensed professional engineer "PE". Check with the department on this.
Top Top