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Posted: 2/28/2010 8:48:45 AM EDT
We've been using a basic Kodak camera for some time, cost about $150, has a little bit of zoom, it has done ok in the past.  The problem with it now is that since we've had a baby, we're taking lots of pictures of her but she never sits still.  All our pictures turn out blurry even if she moves a little.  I'd like to step up to a digital that can capture her even when she is moving.  We've looked at some of the digital SLR's at Sam's Club, but I know so little about them I hesitate to buy one.  Can you guys recommend a camera in the $400-$600 range that will get good shots of her even when moving.  I'd really like it if it would have a "auto" mode or something so I can just take pictures without having to dial in adjustments too much.  I want the adjustments also in case I decide to delve deeper into photography.  Durability would also be nice as I might throw it in a backpack and take it hunting.  Being able to add zoom lenses later would be great also.

Thanks!
Jim
Link Posted: 2/28/2010 9:04:49 AM EDT
canon tl series....slr..compact flash....interchangable lenses.....good camera
Link Posted: 2/28/2010 4:07:45 PM EDT
The TL appears to date to 1968.  I don't think it's digital.

Originally Posted By Echo2:
canon tl series....slr..compact flash....interchangable lenses.....good camera


Link Posted: 2/28/2010 4:28:30 PM EDT
sorry..T1i....brain fart.

also the XSi is also good.
Link Posted: 2/28/2010 5:19:32 PM EDT
Ah, ok.  The t1i is getting out of my price range a bit.  I was reading on the XSi and it sounds pretty close to what I want.  Sounds like it can automatically select a lot of the parameters if you want it to.  Some of the pictures submitted on Amazon are unbelievable.
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 6:14:44 AM EDT
I'm going to suggest the Canon G11 P/S and a Canon hotshoe flash that you can bounce the light off the ceiling. Don't need a 580EX II, but maybe the 430EX II or even the new 270EX that you can pivot the flash itself. Great camera you can get really flexible with post processing and a really nice flash set up. On camera flashes are convenient, but the lighting from them are just so flat.
Link Posted: 3/6/2010 8:13:53 PM EDT
Go nikon. you can pick up a d40 for about 350 bucks for the body and get you one of the wide variety of lens that are out there. also nikons are tuff stuff. if you notice almost all photojournalist use nikon, why? because there tuff. so if the baby does knock it off the table you are still ok. you could get on with a kit with a 18-55 or pick up the 35mm 1.8 for 200 buck and go to town.
just my 2 cents but i love all my nikon gear and i have over 7000 worth of it. i would never switch. also there is more nikon out there, so you can pick up more used glass, if you want to go a little cheaper route. but again just my thoughts.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 6:15:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2010 6:15:44 AM EDT by ScottsGT]
If you are considering used, also look at a Canon 20D, 30D or 40D (40D might bee too high though).
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 6:29:15 AM EDT
I've been running the 30D for about 4 yrs+/-......tis awesome.....if you can grab one used.....do it.

lens selection is "skys the limit".....but the basics are relativly cheap.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 6:43:08 AM EDT
For a basic, general purpose camera you'll be happy with, follow this advice:
1.) Avoid any camera that has a huge zoom range. No one lens is going to do everything well and if it tries it will probably do nothing well. Keep it simple and don't try to get it all.
2.) Given the choice between two, get the one with the FASTER lens (lower aperture numbers)
3.) Given the choice, give priority to the better wide-angle part of the zoom range. You can pretty well ignore the telephoto end since none of them are going to be long enough (assuming  you follow rule 1)
4.) The single most important factor is how fast the picture when you press the button (But unless you go with an SLR, none of them will be fast enough.)
5.) The way it handles and feels in your hands is at least as important as any of the specs.

If you don't want to concern yourself with all that, then follow this back-up advice:
*  Just buy the most expensive Canon you can afford. (Yeah, there may be other good choices, but you won't go wrong following this advice.)

Take either of these approaches and you'll be happy.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 11:30:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2010 11:31:12 AM EDT by 30Caliber]
In that price range, it doesn't matter whether you buy the Cannon or the Nikon SLR.  Pick the one with the controls you like best and enjoy.  I'd go with a Nikon D40.

Link Posted: 3/7/2010 12:18:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 30Caliber:
In that price range, it doesn't matter whether you buy the Cannon or the Nikon SLR.  Pick the one with the controls you like best and enjoy.  I'd go with a Nikon D40.


Truth be told, it doesn't matter any ANY price range range. Both systems will take you as far as you want to go. I've been a Nikon user since 1978, but I think Canon has a lot going on. It just comes down to what you're most comfortable with.
Link Posted: 3/7/2010 4:58:00 PM EDT
Here's something I came across when trying to decide which route to go.  Hope it helps.  http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/nikon-vs-canon.htm
Link Posted: 3/8/2010 4:09:34 AM EDT
I ended up going with the Canon EOS Rebel XSi.  It fell in my price range, had great reviews on Amazon, and I like that Canon has the motor in the camera instead of on the lens (I think I understand that right).


Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
Originally Posted By 30Caliber:
In that price range, it doesn't matter whether you buy the Cannon or the Nikon SLR.  Pick the one with the controls you like best and enjoy.  I'd go with a Nikon D40.


Truth be told, it doesn't matter any ANY price range range. Both systems will take you as far as you want to go. I've been a Nikon user since 1978, but I think Canon has a lot going on. It just comes down to what you're most comfortable with.


Link Posted: 3/8/2010 8:27:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/8/2010 8:27:58 AM EDT by ScottsGT]
Originally Posted By JimTh:
I ended up going with the Canon EOS Rebel XSi.  It fell in my price range, had great reviews on Amazon, and I like that Canon has the motor in the camera instead of on the lens (I think I understand that right).


Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
Originally Posted By 30Caliber:
In that price range, it doesn't matter whether you buy the Cannon or the Nikon SLR.  Pick the one with the controls you like best and enjoy.  I'd go with a Nikon D40.


Truth be told, it doesn't matter any ANY price range range. Both systems will take you as far as you want to go. I've been a Nikon user since 1978, but I think Canon has a lot going on. It just comes down to what you're most comfortable with.




Uhhh, which motor?  The focus motor is part of the lens. XSi is great beginners camera. Now go get a good Canon hot shoe flash and learn to use the bounce. Pop up flash makes everything look flat.

Link Posted: 3/8/2010 12:45:37 PM EDT
It's my understanding that Nikon's in this price range have the focus motor in the lens, but Canon's do not.


Originally Posted By ScottsGT:

Uhhh, which motor?  The focus motor is part of the lens. XSi is great beginners camera. Now go get a good Canon hot shoe flash and learn to use the bounce. Pop up flash makes everything look flat.



Link Posted: 3/8/2010 1:17:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JimTh:
It's my understanding that Nikon's in this price range have the focus motor in the lens, but Canon's do not.
Your understanding is wrong.  All Canon EF lenses have the focus drive systems entirely contained in the lens.  One of the advantages of using a modern lens system.  

Link Posted: 3/9/2010 6:39:31 AM EDT
And some of the Canon lenses are much better than others as far as the motor system works.
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