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Posted: 9/16/2004 1:43:49 PM EST
I've never bought a house before and I'd appreciate some tips from all you experienced home owners.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:47:54 PM EST
Depending on your financial situation put down enough to avoid PMI. PMI is a scam. If the crib will appraise high enough and the owner is cool, you can fudge some numbers and use some loan money to offset down payment. Good luck, the process sucks ass. If you have a relative or friend in real estate, DO NOT use them. By the time the process is over you will end up having to get rude. I know people who were litterally in the parking lot of the title company and got a call from the raltor that they needed more cash for this and that. Don't tolerate that. Tell the realtor UP FRONT that any add ons late in the process are grounds to walk away and let them know you will. Don't fall in love with a realtor or house. Have several homes in your plan.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:53:04 PM EST
Yes- avoid PMI, and try to put 20% down.

Another thing to consider; how much time and money do you want to invest in upkeep?
Old houses and large proerties are great and have alot of character, but they suck up time and money like crazy and eat into your shooting time.
On the other hand, newer houses in developed areas have many neighbors, neighbor's kids, and a myriad of their own troubles (plus all of those people seeing you coming and going with firearms).
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:53:22 PM EST
Definitely get a Home inspector, but don't count on them finding all the major problems. Though they may uncover major problems like termites or water damage, you won't really know what you're getting into till you've lived there for a few months and learn the new houses quirks. The Home inspector is only in there for a couple hours, and will probably miss some things.

Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:55:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By Fred-in-PA:
Yes- avoid PMI, and try to put 20% down.

Another thing to consider; how much time and money do you want to invest in upkeep?
Old houses and large proerties are great and have alot of character, but they suck up time and money like crazy and eat into your shooting time.
On the other hand, newer houses in developed areas have many neighbors, neighbor's kids, and a myriad of their own troubles (plus all of those people seeing you coming and going with firearms).



I deliberatly bought an older house (5,300s ft built 1968) New homes are made of pine here. Older ones are fir construction. just a preference. It had a lot of major things already done, like AC and applainces. Once in a while little stuff comes up. It's all a matter of what you want in your home. Newer ones can be more energy efficient, but you can bring an older home up to speed with some work.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:58:59 PM EST
Always keep in mind during the searching, finding, offering, accepting, loaning, and closing process: all realtors, bankers, inspectors, and escrow agents always lie all the time to everyone. Check and double check everything yourself with your own two eyes. Don't trust anyone who has a financial interest in the transaction. Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 2:03:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By ar50troll:
I deliberatly bought an older house (5,300s ft built 1968)




thats a big ass house!
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 2:05:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By LPDtactical:

Originally Posted By ar50troll:
I deliberatly bought an older house (5,300s ft built 1968)




thats a big ass house!



It's a old farm house. The acreage was broken up and several newer home put here. The worse thing is there are 2 central AC unit's One downstaris and one that services upstaris. Electricity is a bitch.
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