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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/15/2005 9:58:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 10:05:26 PM EDT by Painter]
Pretty good video, if you didn't catch it earlier.
follow the link, find the green box that says "dramatic plane landing" and click on it.
www.cnn.com/2005/US/08/15/emergency.landing/index.html
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:02:18 PM EDT
I would let that pilot fly me from place to place
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 10:04:49 PM EDT
Yeah, he did a nice job of floating that one in. Especially with 25 on board!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 3:51:09 AM EDT
I think he got the #1 wire, that's not gonna look good on his trap record.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:08:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 4:09:29 AM EDT by SouthHoof]
It's CNN , until I see confirmation from a credible source I'd have to believe its computer generated images.


Seriously, nice job parking the bird. Note the Pilot exited then move to the rear of the aircraft to make sure passengers were evacuated.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 4:12:38 AM EDT
Saw that on the news this morning. Kudos to the pilot.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:20:38 AM EDT
That's a great pilot.

Good vid.

CMOS
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:23:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SouthHoof:
It's CNN , until I see confirmation from a credible source I'd have to believe its computer generated images.


Seriously, nice job parking the bird. Note the Pilot exited then move to the rear of the aircraft to make sure passengers were evacuated.



I know! I looked on Fox, but couldn't find it there.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:28:55 AM EDT
Cool vid.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:22:12 AM EDT
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:29:24 AM EDT
wow
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:30:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:31:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.



I'm pretty sure that the one engine thing was the pilot's decision.
He circled for two hours to burn up fuel, then switched to one engine so he wouldn't run out on approach.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:34:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.



He shut down the other engine.



OK, but still it looked like he was fighting it to keep it level.

Does anyone have any experience with double-engine planes? What is it like to fly with only one engine?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:42:07 AM EDT
Anyone else notice how the crew chief, I assume, hops out the back and then helps everyone else out? Everyone's running like hell and he stays to the end. Then I notice that the pilot or copilot comes around and starts helping out. The third crewman is coming to help as the clip ends. That is, to me, the most spectacular thing about the whole affair.

These guys are trained to handle emergency landings. They have no choice in that, their asses are on the line, too. But it's human grit that drives them to get others to safety before themselves.

It's Miller Time for those guys
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:42:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.



He shut down the other engine.



OK, but still it looked like he was fighting it to keep it level.

Does anyone have any experience with double-engine planes? What is it like to fly with only one engine?



No big deal on one engine if you are descending. Full power with a full load is another story, however. Once the field is "made", the good engine can be reduced to flight idle, and there is no asymetrical thrust.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:49:32 AM EDT
He did a damn god job on that one!!!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 7:54:57 AM EDT
DAMN! Thats a pucker factor of at least 10!!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:04:33 AM EDT
Wow,

Sweet vid, God must have been happy at someone on board.....I bet the pilot and co-pilot were bought a few rounds later that night.

David
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:07:09 AM EDT

Thats a pucker factor of at least 10!!


.

You know the seat cushion disappeared.

Hats off to the pilot he/she has skill.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:25:39 AM EDT
Wow good job.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:31:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 8:38:32 AM EDT by phatmax]

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.



He shut down the other engine.



OK, but still it looked like he was fighting it to keep it level.

Does anyone have any experience with double-engine planes? What is it like to fly with only one engine?



No big deal on one engine if you are descending. Full power with a full load is another story, however. Once the field is "made", the good engine can be reduced to flight idle, and there is no asymetrical thrust.



With that load he kept a much higher airspeed on final, in anticipation of a go-around and to keep well above stall speed.
With a twin there is an airspeed, called blue line, that if you are on it or above it and one engine is off and the other is at full power you WON'T stall and torque around the running engine.
Even for some really powerful prop twins such as the C2 your are going to have a shitty climb rate, maybe 200-500 feet per minute, on one engine. This compared to probably 1000-2000 FPM with both engines going.
Many many many people have died due to the following scenario:

Twin with one engine out on final and the pilot lets the airspeed get too low. Once the pilot realizes he can't make the runway he firewalls the remaining engine and tries to climb. If he is below blue line, the aircraft will begin to pull due to asymetric thrust, and the plane will stall and will suddenly roll OVER (or UNDER depending on prop rotation) the running engine because of the torque being produced. At low altitudes this is fatal.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:34:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
I would let that pilot fly me from place to place



And the crew! They did a great job, and landed without much problem. I'd give them a pat on the back and buy them a beer!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:48:14 AM EDT
Does anyone have a link for a download of that video?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:48:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:
I'm pretty sure that the one engine thing was the pilot's decision.
He circled for two hours to burn up fuel, then switched to one engine so he wouldn't run out on approach.



Did someone from the crew say that was why the pilot shut one engine down? IIRC, both engine rotate in the same direction on the E-2/C-2 so the #2 engine would have been shut down to keep it from kicking parts of the splintering prop from being flung into the cabin area. I'm not sure about that engine rotation thing, but I do have this hazy memory of a C-2 buddy telling me about it.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 9:19:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
Wow. Not only did he have to make an extremely gentle landing so as not to tear the belly off, but he only had one engine! It looked like he was fighting the plane to keep it level.

That is skill right there.



He shut down the other engine.



OK, but still it looked like he was fighting it to keep it level.

Does anyone have any experience with double-engine planes? What is it like to fly with only one engine?



Well, for the most part, flying with the critical engine operating is OK. However, when its high and hot, and you need to climb, one engine out is a good way to get killed. In fact, the more power you add, the harder it is to fly. VMC speeds. You are fighting 4 left turning tendencies. Many a pilot has lost an engine on climb, only to roll the aircraft on its back and auger in....

Airliners are different. They have massive power, and guarenteed performance on one engine.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 9:31:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:
I'm pretty sure that the one engine thing was the pilot's decision.
He circled for two hours to burn up fuel, then switched to one engine so he wouldn't run out on approach.



Did someone from the crew say that was why the pilot shut one engine down? IIRC, both engine rotate in the same direction on the E-2/C-2 so the #2 engine would have been shut down to keep it from kicking parts of the splintering prop from being flung into the cabin area. I'm not sure about that engine rotation thing, but I do have this hazy memory of a C-2 buddy telling me about it.




The pilot killed the right engine due to the fact that the left engine is the critical engine for performance. He saved the left engine until the last possible second. They both rotate to the right.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 9:31:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Did someone from the crew say that was why the pilot shut one engine down? IIRC, both engine rotate in the same direction on the E-2/C-2 so the #2 engine would have been shut down to keep it from kicking parts of the splintering prop from being flung into the cabin area.



Not a pilot, but I noticed that the pilots came out a window on the starboard side, the side with the shut-down engine. I'm guessing that when you expect to do that, it's tons safer if the prop isn't still spinning.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 9:41:22 AM EDT
Nice flying there by the pilot.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:39:56 PM EDT
Errr.....
Engine rotation doesn't have shit to do with it.

The C-2 has enough room between the deck and the bottom of the prop arc to not have the props hit the deck if it lands flat. If a wing tips, then the prop is going to hit the deck.

They shut down the starboard engine for two reasons, one was so that the propeller would not get damaged, the other was so that the passengers could exit the aircraft quickly without the crew worring if one of them was going to walk into the turning prop.

The C-2 (and the E-2) both have PLENTY of rudder to off set the engine/propeller torque.
They also have enough rudder to compensate for a lost/shut down engine.

Remember that three of those rudders work.



Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:42:21 PM EDT
That was one hell of a landing. That pilot can deliver my mail anytime!
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 5:56:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Errr.....
Engine rotation doesn't have shit to do with it.

The C-2 has enough room between the deck and the bottom of the prop arc to not have the props hit the deck if it lands flat. If a wing tips, then the prop is going to hit the deck.

They shut down the starboard engine for two reasons, one was so that the propeller would not get damaged, the other was so that the passengers could exit the aircraft quickly without the crew worring if one of them was going to walk into the turning prop.

The C-2 (and the E-2) both have PLENTY of rudder to off set the engine/propeller torque.
They also have enough rudder to compensate for a lost/shut down engine.

Remember that three of those rudders work.






Thanks - I wasn't sure about prop clearance, but I knew the engine wasn't shut down "so he wouldn't run out of fuel".
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