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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/10/2005 11:13:29 AM EDT
I'm signed up to ship out to PI next summer and be in the reserves while in college, and later become an officer. Problem is, my parents aren't very supportive of my choice. They think I'm going to become a statistic or something. Its really hard going through with something when you don't have the support at home. I constantly get the "you're too smart for the military" thing. I don't know, it seems like they had a different life planned out for me, and that I need to follow their plan. Basically, what I'm getting at is, what can I tell them to assure them this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right? Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?
Link Posted: 8/10/2005 11:17:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2005 11:19:03 AM EDT by thedoctors308]
only you can know what you need to do.
i will say this though - if you are a free thinker/individualist, or if you think of yourself as an "intelligent person" who does not like being talked down to, you will find Marine Corps life very, very difficult, not just PI.

eta: not to say you aren't smart, im just saying as an enlisted man in the corps, you will be given an order for everything - when/how to brush your teeth, etc. Some people thrive on that, some don't.
Link Posted: 8/10/2005 11:19:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thedoctors308:
only you can know what you need to do.
i will say this though - if you think of yourself as an "intelligent person" who does not like being talked down to, you will find Marine Corps life very, very difficult, not just PI.



That's one thing that I've done well, I always know my place. I am not above anything.
Link Posted: 8/11/2005 10:18:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2005 10:22:41 PM EDT by MachinegunManiac]
It's like that in all of the branches. You might want to look in the other branches too. The MC doesn't have the amount of MOS's the Army has or the diversity of MOS's.

First off I have to ask, which MOS are you going for? And secondly, what do you want to go to college for? You might your MOS fits your interest/future career.

The MC's got plenty of opportunities too but don't limit yourself to the MC if it doesn't have the MOS you want.

For example, if you want to go medical the MC is not for you.

Another statistic? Well the statistics are looking good compared to any real war we've been in.
Tell your parents you love your freedoms enough to fight for them.

I hate parents like that. "My son shouldn't have to go oversees to protect this country".
So what they're saying is that everyone else's sons are shit for going into the military or eveyone oversees or in the military are retarded people that have no future.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 11:14:59 AM EDT
I am doing Data Systems, and I am currently a Computer Engineering major... lines up pretty well.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 5:42:52 PM EDT
My folks didn't want me to join either, and of course they didn't want their "Baby" going to war, getting hurt, etc. Parents NEVER want that for their kids, but I joined anyway, and they don't like it, but support my decision to serve. I've been in for over a year now, and now they're used to it, and a little more comfortable.
You gotta chose your own path at some point.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 3:47:44 PM EDT
I'd like to meet your parents and ask them to explain just what the fuck they mean by "too smart for the Military."?

No offense bro, but if that's how your parents think, they are officially fuck-tards. They will never understand what it means to sacrifice for the betterment of others. You'll be better off without them.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 7:30:14 PM EDT
Do what YOU want, period.

My parents wanted me to join the Air Force, and to do something that would be useful on the outside. They also wanted me to delay my entry as long as possible (delaying what they knew was inevitable).

I went to MEPS on a Friday morning, and without consulting anybody, I chose the Field Artillery, because at the time, everybody and his damned brother wanted to be a tanker or a grunt, and all the slots for all other combat MOS's were full for the next several months. 13B had a report date of March 18 (this particular friday was March 15, btw), so I grabbed it. I also got a first duty station choice, and I chose germany.

Boy, did I start a shitstorm when I told the folks that evening!

They were less than thrilled that I had chosen the Army, disappointed that I chose Germany as a first duty assignment instead of somewhere "closer to home", and shocked that I was leaving at 4:30 Monday morning. I won't even go into their reaction to the Artillery thing...


But years later (after my father died), my mother confided in me that the old man was very proud of me & my service, and bragged to his friends and coworkers about his son the soldier.

You do what you gotta do. The parents will come around, and while they may not admit it to YOU, they'll be proud of ya, I'm sure.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 7:44:21 PM EDT
Thanks for the support guys.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 7:10:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/25/2005 7:19:42 AM EDT by tweeter]

Originally Posted By Illinigunner21:
I'm signed up to ship out to PI next summer and be in the reserves while in college, and later become an officer. Problem is, my parents aren't very supportive of my choice. They think I'm going to become a statistic or something. Its really hard going through with something when you don't have the support at home. I constantly get the "you're too smart for the military" thing. I don't know, it seems like they had a different life planned out for me, and that I need to follow their plan. Basically, what I'm getting at is, what can I tell them to assure them this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right? Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?




I'm a statistic. There's nothing wrong with it.

If you're making a choice to do what others just talk about in order to make a difference... well, I think that's noble. We need more people to put their money where their mouth is.

Actions speak louder than words. Instead of just waving the flag... you're gonna be carrying it.

edited to add:

the first time your parents see you with that uniform on, they'll be damned proud.
Link Posted: 8/25/2005 11:21:08 PM EDT
First off let me say I would never as a parent say that too my son. I have supported his decsion to join the military from the begining. He made the decsion while he was still in high school to join. He got alot of flack from teachers and students about joining while there was a war going. My mother hated it that my brother and I both went into the service,didn't stop us and was the best thing we ever did. She never supported it and even today has no clue. So as a result I don't tell her much about my son since she is very anti war. Even if you don't find the support amungst your parents,there are others that do appreciate you serving. I wish you luck, you'll do fine and just make the rest of us proud of you.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 5:59:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Illinigunner21:
Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?



Not me personally, but I had a very good friend who did. ..

My buddy "Kirk" was from an affluent family and decided to drop out of an Ivy league college to enlist in the Corps. His father was absolutely pissed, not only did he leave college to join the military, but he enlisted as a grunt as well. His father believed that this choice was beneath him, and an embarrassment to their family. Kirk was cut off and his father withheld his inheritance from his grandfather until his 30th birthday (which was stipulated in his grandfather's will as the latest it could be withheld).

Kirk's entire life before joining the Corps was basically one of appeasement so that he could get that inheritance. One day, in college, he took a good long look at himself in the mirror and decided that he didn't like what he saw. Becoming a Marine was his way of taking control of his life, and dedicating himself to a greater good. Kirk was more than just a friend, he was my brother. To this day it's painful to remember how we parted ways.

On May 10th, 1996 Corporal Eric Kirkland was killed when two helicopters collided in midair while conducting bilateral training operations over Camp Lejeune. Kirk was only one of fourteen who lost their lives that morning, and he wasn't my only friend on one of those helicopters. But he was my best friend.

Kirk was only a few months away from his 30th birthday when he lost his life, and he had come to love the Corps so much that he didn't even care about the inheritance any more. He loved the Corps and was dedicated to making a career out of it.

I never knew Kirk prior to him becoming a Marine, but I could tell from the hours we spent talking that he was a completely different person than before he joined. Sometime immediately after his death, Kirk's father seemed to have changed too. I guess he finally saw that his son had been his own man, and that he loved the life he had chosen. Kirk had been proud to be a Marine, and his father finally realized that service is honorable. Kirk's dad requested that his son be laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery, with full military honors.

Only you can decide if your choice is right for your life. Don't let ANYONE (not even your parents) dictate what is above or below you. Some of the most brilliant people I have ever met (Kirk included) were not only enlisted Marines, but grunts as well. You have to live your own life.
Link Posted: 8/26/2005 7:35:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/26/2005 7:36:55 PM EDT by NUCdt04]
Do what YOU want... I dropped out of college after 4 and a half years and enlisted in the Corps... 0300 open contract- went through PI, got 0311 like I wanted at SOI and now I'm out in Hawaii...there are times I look around and want to pull what hair I have out at some of the stuff that goes on- but (and you'll learn this phrase well)... "it's the Marine Corps".... and I wouldn't have it any other way- as I sit here typing this to you my feet are killing me after our #### this morning that we got up at 0200 for and didn't step until 0500... and our weapons were already drawn...but at the same time I'm getting ready for a weekend down in Waikiki.... My parents told me the same things yours did- but my dad and both my grandfathers have been in the Corps... and they knew I was going the same way- they'll support you and they'll get over what they feel now... mine do and did (even after telling them I'm headed to Iraq). It's worth it... now data systems- you may get ragged on for that a bit by us "Grunt" types but it's all in good fun- we need all the pogues' we can get to keep us in the fight..... have a good time at PI- it's the easiest it'll get (well mabye not for you.. )

txleapd: I'm sorry.... that's a tough loss but if he was happy doing what he wanted......

Semper Fi
-Roth
Link Posted: 8/27/2005 12:33:38 AM EDT
I'll echo what everyone else has said. You're the only one that can answer whether this is right or wrong. I joined the Army more out of impulse and rebellion than knowing it was the right thing for me. My parents didn't support my decision, but they supported me through my tour. Looking back, it was a real good thing for me to go through.

Back to the original topic, tell them how you feel. It's about all you can do. They'll be parents about it eventually. Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 10:32:43 AM EDT
Parents never understand what motivates their children to voluntarily go into harm's way.

My mother was appaled when I joined the Marine Corps, and was horified when a war broke out 2 years later. She understood why I went, but she was never comfortable with the idea, and never would have been as long as I was still there.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 1:57:43 PM EDT
I myself have been told that im to smart for what im doing (11C Infantry Mortars) and my GT score could have gotten me anyjob in the Army I wanted. When I go home people ask why im doing it and didnt go to college or that I should have at least went to school to be an officer. I work with a lot of guys in the same situation. Bottom line, you are going to school and becoming an officer, and I still love my job. Someone has to do it and if the Army was completely full of know-nothings we wouldnt be as effective as we are. You gotta do what you gotta do. And even though they think I shouldve done something else most people in my town are still proud of what I do.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 2:17:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Illinigunner21:
I'm signed up to ship out to PI next summer and be in the reserves while in college, and later become an officer. Problem is, my parents aren't very supportive of my choice. They think I'm going to become a statistic or something. Its really hard going through with something when you don't have the support at home. I constantly get the "you're too smart for the military" thing. I don't know, it seems like they had a different life planned out for me, and that I need to follow their plan. Basically, what I'm getting at is, what can I tell them to assure them this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right? Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?





Do what you want to do, Military life is not for everyone so be sure. My Army years were some of the best and so were the guys I served with.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 4:50:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Illinigunner21:
I'm signed up to ship out to PI next summer and be in the reserves while in college, and later become an officer. Problem is, my parents aren't very supportive of my choice. They think I'm going to become a statistic or something. Its really hard going through with something when you don't have the support at home. I constantly get the "you're too smart for the military" thing. I don't know, it seems like they had a different life planned out for me, and that I need to follow their plan. Basically, what I'm getting at is, what can I tell them to assure them this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right? Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?



One of my parents feels the same way. If you have to explain why you're serving to someone, they'll probably never understand.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 5:22:46 AM EDT

I am an AF Vet., and father of a 6 yr old boy.
My Dad was a career officer, and on active duty in the AF when I brought home the paperwork for him to sign, when I was 17 1/2. He didnt think the AF was for me, and in retrospect, in alot of ways he was right. He ended up helping me pick a good career field, Medical X-Ray Specialist, and swore me in.
He supported me through thick and thin in my military career, despite some rocky days.

As for my son.
I have mixed feelings about him serving. As a parent, you don't ever want your child's life to be difficult, or for them to go in harm's way. The military can be very good for some, and a dead end or worse if it's the wrong choice for an individual. My son's college is prepaid, through a Virginia state program, thanks again, Dad! While I won't discourage my son from serving, I will urge him to complete college, and serve as an Officer. It's just a better life as an Officer, with better options when he seperates/retires.
Military tradition runs long and deep in my family, back to the French and Indian Wars.
I try not to, even though he is only six, glorify or denigrate the military to him.
When he sees something on TV, I am honest in my experiences.
If my son chooses not to serve, that's ok, too. As long as he finds something in life to support himself that he does well at, and is happy.

Good luck in the Corps, Illinigunner21.
Oh yeah, one bit of fatherly advice......
Suck up on every education opportunity the Corps provides. Be it military training, Univ. of Md etc. Masters courses, whatever. You will eventually leave the Corps, and those programs will open doors for you down the road.

DaddyDett

Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:11:18 AM EDT
Someone hit on it alittle already. One of my greatest job satisfactions, is serving something greater than myself. It's one of the few jobs were no one is in it for the money or stays for the money. Pride in myself and the opportunity to affect the lives of others in a positive way keeps me here. Fun and adventure are part of the package.

I also belive the path to manhood lies in concuring your fears. Mine was the fear of personnal death or injury. I've overcome that fear pretty well to the point of going out to pick a fight in combat.

The Army has a commercial on TV right now that show a father talking to his son who just came back from basic training. The father says "You've changed". The son says "In what way". The dad says "You did 2 things you never did before when you got off the bus. You shook my hand and looked me in the eye". "Where'd that come from".

Nuff said.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 2:54:41 PM EDT
Nice post TangoChaser.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 4:25:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Illinigunner21:
I'm signed up to ship out to PI next summer and be in the reserves while in college, and later become an officer. Problem is, my parents aren't very supportive of my choice. They think I'm going to become a statistic or something. Its really hard going through with something when you don't have the support at home. I constantly get the "you're too smart for the military" thing. I don't know, it seems like they had a different life planned out for me, and that I need to follow their plan. Basically, what I'm getting at is, what can I tell them to assure them this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right? Has anyone else gotten this from loved ones?



It's a shame you're not getting support at home. I think you're doing a very honorable thing. Unfortunately, I'm too old to enlist, but if I could, I'd serve in a heartbeat. I think one of the greatest and noble vocations, is to serve your country...in any manner.

You listed that "this is what I want and I know what I am doing is right." That, my friend, is all you need to tell them.

Good luck and be safe.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 7:44:05 PM EDT
Good luck to you, follow your heart and dreams. There is no nobler profession than a defender of freedom. I just got commissioned in the naval reserves on Saturday against my parents wishes. My parents were not there and I didn't invite them. I love them, and talk about it with them, but you have to do what you want to do.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 9:16:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thedoctors308:
only you can know what you need to do.
i will say this though - if you are a free thinker/individualist, or if you think of yourself as an "intelligent person" who does not like being talked down to, you will find Marine Corps life very, very difficult, not just PI.

eta: not to say you aren't smart, im just saying as an enlisted man in the corps, you will be given an order for everything - when/how to brush your teeth, etc. Some people thrive on that, some don't.



I will second this, having worked with and around the Marines here, they treat EVERYONE like shit. Junior officers included. It seems, at least for this bunch, the only method of leadership they know is ass chewing.

Funny thing is, the BN that came before them was not like that. This bunch resents the fact that our guys are out there as Army soldiers doing a high-speed job, and the fact they are reservists adds fuel to the resentment....to the point of them risking lives rather than allow us to help with something. But once again the previous bunch worked well and loved what we did and just let us do it.

They treat them like crap, take every chance they can to put them down, but when we talk about pulling them out to work eslewhere all the sudden they are the best thing since smokeless powder and they couldn't function without them.......................

Oh well, by the time we leave we will be on our third rotation of Marines, so maybe the next bunch will be better.
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