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Posted: 8/3/2009 8:39:24 PM EST
She recently purchased a Springfield XD9 sub compact, and has gotten to the range a few times since then. Most of her shots have a tendency to hit low. I've noticed that when she's fired her last round and hasn't noticed that the slide is back, she will jerk down when she tries to fire it again. I'm guessing this is some sort of problem with anticipating the recoil, but I don't know what to tell her to try to fix it. Any suggestions or drills she can do? You might get some pics if your advice works.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:40:44 PM EST
Mix dummy rounds with live ones, so she wont know if the gun is gonna go bang or not. Ive used this trick for alot of people with my ruger single six, seems to cure the problem right up with enough practice.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:40:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 8:41:57 PM EST by Johnny_Reno]
Originally Posted By SW-14:
She recently purchased a Springfield XD9 sub compact, and has gotten to the range a few times since then. Most of her shots have a tendency to hit low. I've noticed that when she's fired her last round and hasn't noticed that the slide is back, she will jerk down when she tries to fire it again. I'm guessing this is some sort of problem with anticipating the recoil, but I don't know what to tell her to try to fix it. Any suggestions or drills she can do? You might get some pics if your advice works.



I saw someone do this before.

She's squeezing with her whole hand, not just the trigger finger.

Hold your gun and try it once. Where does the barrel go?



Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:41:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/3/2009 8:43:59 PM EST by Danj]
Read Surgical Speed Shooting by Andy Stanford and get her professional training. Two days at a professional pistol class will get you shooting properly and then you can practice properly. Her grip, sight alignment, follow through, trigger control etc could all be fucked up.

My solution to worrying about recoil is just putting more rounds down range so you get used to recoil. The snap caps mixed in is only really diagnostic.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:43:51 PM EST
Have her practice dry firing at home. Tell her to stop being afraid of recoil, ha, but seriously she should get used to it after a while. Tell her to slowly press the trigger and keep the sights on target and just let the gun go off.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:56:13 PM EST
Send the girl and the gun to my house. I'll get this all straightened out for ya bud, happy to help.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 8:58:58 PM EST
By now you should know to post pics
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 9:02:04 PM EST
Dibs on gun if it doesn't work out for her

Have cash
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 9:36:50 PM EST
Blank and ball with the dime. ( I don't know her pistol, so I'm assuming the slide is flat-topped.)

Hand her the gun without her knowing whether a round is chambered or not. Place a dime on the flat of the slide (well aft of the front sight so she doesn't get one in the forehead). Trigger press until striker/hammer falls; shouldn't drop the coin if done correctly on empty chamber. Once she gets this down, start mixing in an occasional loaded chamber. Decrease loaded chambers if she regresses, increase as she loses the anticipatory trigger mash.

Works great with stressed out Academy geeks, so maybe it'll work for her, too.
Link Posted: 8/3/2009 11:13:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By thefreshman991:
Dibs on gun if it doesn't work out for her

Have cash


dibs on GIRL if THAT doesn't work out.

Seriously... Accuracy doesn't just happen. It is a teachable and learnable trait.

Here's an article I wrote for ARFCOM about how I overcame similar problems.

The phenomenon of "anticipating the recoil" or "flinching" as you fire, is due to reflex, nothing more. Reflexes can be taught and learned; just ask any karate guy. Way back in the day, when your ancestors and mine were settling disputes with rocks & sharpened sticks, we had some common enemies: the bear, the panther, the lion, the tiger... All of them did the same thing: they would ROAR and they would JUMP AT YOU. Your natural and unlearned response was to PUSH AWAY the attacker.

Nowadays, you have this dangerous tool in front of you, and you pull the trigger, and it ROARS, and it JUMPS AT YOU. Your response is to push it away! Here is a drill you can do to cure this. It helped me in one 1/2 hour range session.

If you have access to a large-bore revolver, one that will provide some fairly serious recoil, then do this: Load 5 loaded rounds, and 1 empty. Spin the cylinder & close it without looking at it. Line it up with the target & squeeze off 6 shots. When you hit the empty round, you will see your sights dip!

THIS part is important!

Another thing you will experience when you hit the empty cylinder is the 'tingling' in your arms that makes you push the gun away from you. It is a sort of "muscle memory." This is masked by the recoil, and you don't feel it when the gun fires. But it is this sensation you should be trying to avoid.

Now try loading the revolver with all empty brass. Align the revolver with the target and squeeze off a few “dry fire" shots. You will see your sights move & feel your arm tingle. Do this a few more times with the intent of keeping the sights on the target. Also, try to "follow through" with the shot: As you are dry-firing, pretend that the pistol is firing and recoiling. It looks and feels pretty silly, clicking and letting your muzzle raise and lower, but you are actually doing a little "muscle training" in the process. You are also training yourself to re-acquire the original sight picture.

When you've kept the sights aligned for about 20 "dry shots," go to the next step.

Now remove one empty casing from the cylinder. Replace the casing with a live round. Spin the cylinder & close it w/o looking at it, so you don't know when the live round comes around. Align, squeeze & shoot as above. When the live round comes around, you likely will be hitting right in the black, probably 8 or 9 or even 10 ring.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 12:01:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 12:04:27 AM EST by Badseed]
Originally Posted By lospeed_hidrag2:
Mix dummy rounds with live ones, so she wont know if the gun is gonna go bang or not. Ive used this trick for alot of people with my ruger single six, seems to cure the problem right up with enough practice.


This needs to be fixed before one goes to "professional instruction", it's not something that will be remedied by reading a book or performing drills with a class over a weekend.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 12:10:31 AM EST
I also recommend dry fire. She needs to retrain herself to not pull the pistol down when firing and dry fire is the best way to do that.

Here's what I suggest:

At home: Double check that the gun is unloaded. Point the gun in a safe direction and something that would stop a bullet. Then dry fire for about five minutes a day, every day, or as close to every day as you can. Make sure you keep the gun steady during dry fire and do not pull the gun off target.

At the range: After about a week return to the range. Before you load the pistol, do four or five dry fire reps on the firing line. Make sure they are perfect. Then immediately load and fire a slow fire string. Work on perfect trigger control on every shot.

You should see some improvement immediately. If you start to pull the gun off target again, stop shooting and do another four or five reps of dry fire before reloading and continuing to shoot.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 12:14:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 12:16:07 AM EST by AcidGambit]
Originally Posted By SW-14:
She recently purchased a Springfield XD9 sub compact, and has gotten to the range a few times since then. Most of her shots have a tendency to hit low. I've noticed that when she's fired her last round and hasn't noticed that the slide is back, she will jerk down when she tries to fire it again. I'm guessing this is some sort of problem with anticipating the recoil, but I don't know what to tell her to try to fix it. Any suggestions or drills she can do? You might get some pics if your advice works.


She's anticipating recoil... Take her to the range and do ball and dummy drills with her. Put a penny on the front sight, embrace the penny.

"Dry fire" is all well and good if it is done properly... The problem with DF is you know the firearm is unloaded . get her to practice some DF (make sure the mag and ammo are in another room), then run ball and dummy drills, and the penny drill.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 1:28:53 AM EST
Ball and dummy practice as well as dry fire might help. As mentioned several times above, she is anticipating recoil and "pushing" the gun as she fires.

Often professional instruction will work better than instruction from the husband/boyfriend. If she intends to continue shooting, you don't want to get bad habits ingrained into her shooting. I've done a fair amount of pistol instruction and have found that women are easier to work with than most men. I'd recommend getting her to a basic pistol class and help her develop good basic skills to build on.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 1:49:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By Johnny_Reno:
Originally Posted By SW-14:
She recently purchased a Springfield XD9 sub compact, and has gotten to the range a few times since then. Most of her shots have a tendency to hit low. I've noticed that when she's fired her last round and hasn't noticed that the slide is back, she will jerk down when she tries to fire it again. I'm guessing this is some sort of problem with anticipating the recoil, but I don't know what to tell her to try to fix it. Any suggestions or drills she can do? You might get some pics if your advice works.



I saw someone do this before.

She's squeezing with her whole hand, not just the trigger finger.

Hold your gun and try it once. Where does the barrel go?

+1. This is what most chicks do when learning pistol or shooting a larger caliber than they are used to.





Link Posted: 8/4/2009 2:14:49 AM EST
Have her practice dry firing and use the ball and dummy technique to help her see what she is doing.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 3:46:43 AM EST
she could be relaxing too soon after the shot.

Have her dry fire the gun at least 10-20 times a day until she doesn't flinch
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