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Posted: 11/17/2012 2:50:00 PM EST
So after a few too many beers, I left my pan out, uncleaned overnight, and it's got the rusties.
What's my best bet?
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 2:52:49 PM EST
wash, use steel wool to remove rust, wash again, reseason
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 2:54:11 PM EST
Scrub with fine steel wool
Quick rinse
Heat on burner until dry
Reseason
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 2:58:36 PM EST
Thanks guys. Will do...
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:08:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 3:11:38 PM EST by Subnet]

Originally Posted By rdove:
wash, use steel wool to remove rust, wash again, reseason

This. It ain't hard.

And if simply leaving it out rusted it, it probably wasn't seasoned all that well to begin with. I once put mine in the dishwasher (complete with high heat dry) to prove a point (and took pics!).

2-3 meals later, and it was back to non-stick goodness.

From now on, before you put it away, wash it out in hot water with a plastic scrub brush. Use steel wool on tough spots, if it's really needed. You won't hurt it. Towel dry the excess water off, dry it on the stove (low heat), then wipe it down all over with a very (and I mean VERY) light coat of oil. It honestly doesn't matter which oil, just use something. Crank the heat up. When it smokes for about a minute, kill the heat. After a couple of months, you'll be able to abuse the shit out of it, and it will never lose it's non-stick properties, nor will it rust on you.

Ignore any and all fancy seasoning rituals. They're a waste of time. Just USE it, and wipe it down with a super light coating of your chosen oil, after you've cleaned it. At this point, I rarely even clean mine. I just wipe it out with paper towels. Nothing sticks to it.

Another pro-tip: Don't use plastic utensils. You want a metal spatula, with a straight beveled edge and slightly rounded corners. You're not cooking on Teflon, you're cooking on a hunk of cast iron. The scraping of a flat metal spatula will fill in microscopic voids, and knock peaks down.

A lot of people errantly confuse "old caked on food" with "seasoning". If you think you're removing seasoning with your spatula, you're wrong. You're removing old food. Seasoning doesn't come off without insane heat, oven cleaner, a sand blaster, or some combination of of all three.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:15:54 PM EST
I just started one over today. My wife picked up an old #10 Griswold at a garage sale last weekend for .50c. It was covered in a good layer of rust. I put it in the oven on the self clean cycle for 5 hours. Smoked the hell out of the house. Let it cool off, wiped all the ash off, scrubbed it with a little dish soap and steel wool, washed it, got it warm on the stovetop, wiped the whole thing down with lard, then turned up the heat till it smoked for a couple minutes.

Looks like a brand new pan and ready for Sunday morning bacon!
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:22:37 PM EST
Another fun idea, while you're working up your seasoning:

Early on, shit's gonna stick for a while. No biggie. Use this to your advantage. Cook a lot of meat products, for a while. It's good for you, anyway. Steaks, bacon, pork chops, and so forth. Little bits of food are going to be stuck to the bottom of the skillet when you're done.

So deglaze it. If (for example), you pan fried a steak, add just a little bit of beef broth to the skillet, while your steak is resting. That hot beef broth will act as a solvent, and you'll be able to easily scrape the surface of the skillet smooth with your spatula. The little bits of stuck food will dissolve, and now you've got the beginnings of a nifty sauce to pour over your steak. Or, why not add some butter and some mushrooms? With enough fat in the pan, your mushrooms will absolutely not stick.

And now you've accomplished a few things:

1. You just found an easy way to remove stuck bits of food.
2. Your skillet is getting better and better, every time you do this.
3. It gives you something to do, while your steak is resting.
4. It tastes awesome, and...
5. Now you have some tasty sliced mushrooms to go with your steak.

There are a bazillion things you can do, with little bits of stuck protein and fat, in your skillet. Look at it like an opportunity, rather than a hindrance
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:24:43 PM EST
chuck one of these



In an electric drill and go to town.

Gloves and glasses are a good idea.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:37:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By edb66:
chuck one of these

http://www.greatnecktools.com/upload/products_images/CBC2.jpg

In an electric drill and go to town.

Gloves and glasses are a good idea.

I might on a garage sale find, but if it's a normally used skillet with a rust spot or two, I'd just hit it with some steel wool, oil it, heat it until it smokes, and call it good.

When I did my funny little test in the dishwasher (I love committing crimes against humanity for science), it came out with a couple of rust spots. I didn't even scrub the shit out of them. I got most of it with an SOS pad. There was probably some rust left, when I was done. But months later, it's buried and trapped under a rock hard layer of whatever it is oil does, over time. It's a shitty Lodge skillet (no machining, rough as hell when new), that's almost glass smooth on the cooking surface, and a very deep black.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:38:40 PM EST
Listen to Subnet.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:41:38 PM EST
Steel wool will rust.

Electrolytic is the best method
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:47:21 PM EST

Originally Posted By Merrell:
Steel wool will rust.

Electrolytic is the best method

I did this on a set of Jeep brake calipers. Interestingly, I did it with Keith_J on the phone, who was having me look for odds and ends around my garage to make it work. It was his idea.

"You got a batter charger, by chance?"
"How about some baking soda in the kitchen?"
"You need some pipe. The left over black pipe you used for your furnace? That'll work".
"Got any jumper cables?"

And so forth.

Long story short, they were PERFECT, when they came out. I imagine it'd work wonderfully, on a really shitty hunk of cast iron.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 3:57:16 PM EST
I like to burn them out. Build a good hardwood fire and put the pan in tit. Let the fire burn out and let the pan cool slowly. Then wash it and season it. It will be as good as new.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:01:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 4:02:34 PM EST by Cpt_Kirks]
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Another fun idea, while you're working up your seasoning:

Early on, shit's gonna stick for a while. No biggie. Use this to your advantage. Cook a lot of meat products, for a while. It's good for you, anyway. Steaks, bacon, pork chops, and so forth. Little bits of food are going to be stuck to the bottom of the skillet when you're done.

So deglaze it. If (for example), you pan fried a steak, add just a little bit of beef broth to the skillet, while your steak is resting. That hot beef broth will act as a solvent, and you'll be able to easily scrape the surface of the skillet smooth with your spatula. The little bits of stuck food will dissolve, and now you've got the beginnings of a nifty sauce to pour over your steak. Or, why not add some butter and some mushrooms? With enough fat in the pan, your mushrooms will absolutely not stick.

And now you've accomplished a few things:

1. You just found an easy way to remove stuck bits of food.
2. Your skillet is getting better and better, every time you do this.
3. It gives you something to do, while your steak is resting.
4. It tastes awesome, and...
5. Now you have some tasty sliced mushrooms to go with your steak.

There are a bazillion things you can do, with little bits of stuck protein and fat, in your skillet. Look at it like an opportunity, rather than a hindrance


Use a large wooden spoon to deglaze instead of a spatula. It will not scratch the season coating you are building up.

Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:02:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
Steel wool will rust.

Electrolytic is the best method

I did this on a set of Jeep brake calipers. Interestingly, I did it with Keith_J on the phone, who was having me look for odds and ends around my garage to make it work. It was his idea.

"You got a batter charger, by chance?"
"How about some baking soda in the kitchen?"
"You need some pipe. The left over black pipe you used for your furnace? That'll work".
"Got any jumper cables?"

And so forth.

Long story short, they were PERFECT, when they came out. I imagine it'd work wonderfully, on a really shitty hunk of cast iron.


I'm gettin the itch to do it on a bunch of cast iron things - maybe at work on the weekends (bigger area than the garage

Post treatment is what I am thinking about now - flash dry at hgh temp to prevent rust and then some coating right quick - right now it's Eezox for the gun stuff, and Crisco for the cookin iron. Will do the latter first, of course.

Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:03:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Cpt_Kirks:
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Another fun idea, while you're working up your seasoning:

Early on, shit's gonna stick for a while. No biggie. Use this to your advantage. Cook a lot of meat products, for a while. It's good for you, anyway. Steaks, bacon, pork chops, and so forth. Little bits of food are going to be stuck to the bottom of the skillet when you're done.

So deglaze it. If (for example), you pan fried a steak, add just a little bit of beef broth to the skillet, while your steak is resting. That hot beef broth will act as a solvent, and you'll be able to easily scrape the surface of the skillet smooth with your spatula. The little bits of stuck food will dissolve, and now you've got the beginnings of a nifty sauce to pour over your steak. Or, why not add some butter and some mushrooms? With enough fat in the pan, your mushrooms will absolutely not stick.

And now you've accomplished a few things:

1. You just found an easy way to remove stuck bits of food.
2. Your skillet is getting better and better, every time you do this.
3. It gives you something to do, while your steak is resting.
4. It tastes awesome, and...
5. Now you have some tasty sliced mushrooms to go with your steak.

There are a bazillion things you can do, with little bits of stuck protein and fat, in your skillet. Look at it like an opportunity, rather than a hindrance


Use a large wooden spoon to deglaze instead of a spatula. It will not scratch the season coating you are building up.


I did mine with a metal spatula. I think it works fine.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:04:39 PM EST
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:05:10 PM EST
Good stuff
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:06:05 PM EST

Originally Posted By 583:
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.

Hands down, Griswold. Haven't been made in forever. eBay is your friend.

You can do fine with new manufacture Lodge, but it takes a shit ton longer to get good performance.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:06:12 PM EST
I think Lodge is the only US made - nothing Chinese.

Maybe an older Griswold or something if you want to get a working heirloom with a smoother finish.

For the price, nothing can beat Lodge though.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:07:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By Merrell:
I think Lodge is the only US made - nothing Chinese.

Maybe an older Griswold or something if you want to get a working heirloom with a smoother finish.

For the price, nothing can beat Lodge though.

Lodge and Griswold are the only two choices, really.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:08:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By 583:
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.

Hands down, Griswold. Haven't been made in forever. eBay is your friend.

You can do fine with new manufacture Lodge, but it takes a shit ton longer to get good performance.


Shoot, you should go to the WAG convention

def your neck of the woods.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:17:17 PM EST
My Lodge fry pans and Dutch oven (For camp, the one with a raised edge on the lid to hold hot coals.) are almost thirty years old and have achieved a fantastic seasoning. My wife can ruin it in a day. After a bit of scrubbing and re-seasoning, they are as good as they were. I coat them lightly with oil, heat till they smoke, let them cool, and then fry up some bacon and potatoes.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:17:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
I think Lodge is the only US made - nothing Chinese.

Maybe an older Griswold or something if you want to get a working heirloom with a smoother finish.

For the price, nothing can beat Lodge though.

Lodge and Griswold are the only two choices, really.


Wagner.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:18:35 PM EST
Much to my horror I discovered the same thing on one of my favorite cast iron skillets, I have know idea how I let this happen.
I'm just going to scrub it down with a scouring pad then lube it up with bacon grease and re-season it - no big deal.

Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:20:32 PM EST

Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
I think Lodge is the only US made - nothing Chinese.

Maybe an older Griswold or something if you want to get a working heirloom with a smoother finish.

For the price, nothing can beat Lodge though.

Lodge and Griswold are the only two choices, really.


Wagner.

Or that.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:20:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Much to my horror I discovered the same thing on one of my favorite cast iron skillets, I have know idea how I let this happen.
I'm just going to scrub it down with a scouring pad then lube it up with bacon grease and re-season it - no big deal.

http://www.pbase.com/terry_56/image/147374121.jpg


http://www.wag-society.org/cleaning.php
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:21:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
I think Lodge is the only US made - nothing Chinese.

Maybe an older Griswold or something if you want to get a working heirloom with a smoother finish.

For the price, nothing can beat Lodge though.

Lodge and Griswold are the only two choices, really.


Wagner.

Or that.

I've also got a couple of Birmingham skillets.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:22:10 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By edb66:
chuck one of these

http://www.greatnecktools.com/upload/products_images/CBC2.jpg

In an electric drill and go to town.

Gloves and glasses are a good idea.

I might on a garage sale find, but if it's a normally used skillet with a rust spot or two, I'd just hit it with some steel wool, oil it, heat it until it smokes, and call it good.

When I did my funny little test in the dishwasher (I love committing crimes against humanity for science), it came out with a couple of rust spots. I didn't even scrub the shit out of them. I got most of it with an SOS pad. There was probably some rust left, when I was done. But months later, it's buried and trapped under a rock hard layer of whatever it is oil does, over time. It's a shitty Lodge skillet (no machining, rough as hell when new), that's almost glass smooth on the cooking surface, and a very deep black.

So Wal-Mart Lodge brand is no good?
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:22:14 PM EST
slick -50
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:22:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 4:22:50 PM EST by PistolPutz]
Tagging this will be faster than calling my wife's hillbilly grandma............

ETA: She is deadly with a cast iron skillet though.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:23:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Much to my horror I discovered the same thing on one of my favorite cast iron skillets, I have know idea how I let this happen.
I'm just going to scrub it down with a scouring pad then lube it up with bacon grease and re-season it - no big deal.

http://www.pbase.com/terry_56/image/147374121.jpg

Yeah, that'll rub off easy. Oil it, and yer done.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:23:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By knifewrench:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By edb66:
chuck one of these

http://www.greatnecktools.com/upload/products_images/CBC2.jpg

In an electric drill and go to town.

Gloves and glasses are a good idea.

I might on a garage sale find, but if it's a normally used skillet with a rust spot or two, I'd just hit it with some steel wool, oil it, heat it until it smokes, and call it good.

When I did my funny little test in the dishwasher (I love committing crimes against humanity for science), it came out with a couple of rust spots. I didn't even scrub the shit out of them. I got most of it with an SOS pad. There was probably some rust left, when I was done. But months later, it's buried and trapped under a rock hard layer of whatever it is oil does, over time. It's a shitty Lodge skillet (no machining, rough as hell when new), that's almost glass smooth on the cooking surface, and a very deep black.

So Wal-Mart Lodge brand is no good?

It's fine, it just doesn't have a smooth machined surface like the old Griswolds.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:28:32 PM EST
I've been looking at picking one up. Lodge is sold at Wal-Mart.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:31:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 4:32:30 PM EST by AZ_Sky]
Originally Posted By knifewrench:
I've been looking at picking one up. Lodge is sold at Wal-Mart.


Pick one up!
Everyone needs at least one cast iron skillet even if all you will use it for is bacon!

Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:34:44 PM EST
WTF do you people do to get your pans to rust overnight? I abuse mine and they just keep coming back for more.

Biggest problem is that people baby their cast iron and never develop a real layer of seasoning. Real seasoning is a burnt on layer of blackness. Ignore the seasoning instructions written by in-house lawyers and yuppies. You need to take that shit up to around 500 degrees and bake it on. Cooking bacon in cast iron and then wiping out the pan isn't seasoning, it's just a nasty layer of greasy fat. Think of it like parkerizing/bluing vs protective oil on a gun.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:40:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By t-money:
WTF do you people do to get your pans to rust overnight? I abuse mine and they just keep coming back for more.

Biggest problem is that people baby their cast iron and never develop a real layer of seasoning. Real seasoning is a burnt on layer of blackness. Ignore the seasoning instructions written by in-house lawyers and yuppies. You need to take that shit up to around 500 degrees and bake it on. Cooking bacon in cast iron and then wiping out the pan isn't seasoning, it's just a nasty layer of greasy fat. Think of it like parkerizing/bluing vs protective oil on a gun.

Or do like me, and cook steaks in a 500F oven every night for...months?
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:43:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By rdove:
wash, use steel wool to remove rust, wash again, reseason

This. It ain't hard.

And if simply leaving it out rusted it, it probably wasn't seasoned all that well to begin with. I once put mine in the dishwasher (complete with high heat dry) to prove a point (and took pics!).

2-3 meals later, and it was back to non-stick goodness.

From now on, before you put it away, wash it out in hot water with a plastic scrub brush. Use steel wool on tough spots, if it's really needed. You won't hurt it. Towel dry the excess water off, dry it on the stove (low heat), then wipe it down all over with a very (and I mean VERY) light coat of oil. It honestly doesn't matter which oil, just use something. Crank the heat up. When it smokes for about a minute, kill the heat. After a couple of months, you'll be able to abuse the shit out of it, and it will never lose it's non-stick properties, nor will it rust on you.

Ignore any and all fancy seasoning rituals. They're a waste of time. Just USE it, and wipe it down with a super light coating of your chosen oil, after you've cleaned it. At this point, I rarely even clean mine. I just wipe it out with paper towels. Nothing sticks to it.

Another pro-tip: Don't use plastic utensils. You want a metal spatula, with a straight beveled edge and slightly rounded corners. You're not cooking on Teflon, you're cooking on a hunk of cast iron. The scraping of a flat metal spatula will fill in microscopic voids, and knock peaks down.

A lot of people errantly confuse "old caked on food" with "seasoning". If you think you're removing seasoning with your spatula, you're wrong. You're removing old food. Seasoning doesn't come off without insane heat, oven cleaner, a sand blaster, or some combination of of all three.


^What he said. I find that a regular regimen of frying bacon in the skillet will keep it seasoned nicely, and it makes everything you make in it taste better
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:47:10 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By 583:
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.

Hands down, Griswold. Haven't been made in forever. eBay is your friend.

You can do fine with new manufacture Lodge, but it takes a shit ton longer to get good performance.


Before I cruise on over to E Bay and look for Griswolds is there anything I should be aware of ?

I'm sure someone can fuck up a skillet and then post it for sale. So what should I be looking out for so I don't buy a dog.?
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:47:53 PM EST
Ive just completed reseasoning a bunch of old cast. Some was in terrible shape and i started them with oven cleaner an let stand 24 hrs in a trash bag. Washed them up and began the process i have found leads to a nearly stick proof finish. It takes time but simple. You wipe the pan on all surfsces with canola oil the papertowl nearly all you can off the surface. Put pan in oven cold. Turn oven on to 500. Once its at 500 turn oven off and leave door closed and dont take pan out till oven is back to 100. You do this over and over. 6 times seems adequate. Ill do 8 usually. Lots of effort but you will love the result
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:54:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By 583:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By 583:
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.

Hands down, Griswold. Haven't been made in forever. eBay is your friend.

You can do fine with new manufacture Lodge, but it takes a shit ton longer to get good performance.


Before I cruise on over to E Bay and look for Griswolds is there anything I should be aware of ?

I'm sure someone can fuck up a skillet and then post it for sale. So what should I be looking out for so I don't buy a dog.?


http://www.griswoldandwagner.com/information/Repros/repros.html

Check feedback, don't go cheap
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 4:56:55 PM EST
just over night? Cant possibly be so bad that it requires steel wool. I bet some oil a green scrubby pad then a good rinse and some heat makes that go away. Now if you left it out in the yard for a week or two then yea scrub it with steel.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:00:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 5:01:32 PM EST by salsa]
Flax seed oil. I know I will get flamed because everyones grandmother used bacon fat and lard or whatever to season their CI for saying this. The very best thing bar NONE to reseason any cast iron is flax seed oil from the health food store. Invest some time and hit it six times heating to 400 F for an hour and let cool completely and repeat the steps until you have done it six times and it will give you non stick surface as good as teflon AND you can wash it even with dawn and not harm the season. It is all I do now and will not use another season ever as long I have flax seed oil. Google flax seed oil season and decide for yourself.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:03:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By 583:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By 583:
My wife could use a new cast iron skillet or two, what brand would you guys recommend.

Hands down, Griswold. Haven't been made in forever. eBay is your friend.

You can do fine with new manufacture Lodge, but it takes a shit ton longer to get good performance.


Before I cruise on over to E Bay and look for Griswolds is there anything I should be aware of ?

I'm sure someone can fuck up a skillet and then post it for sale. So what should I be looking out for so I don't buy a dog.?


Um, yeah... As a kid, we used to make sinkers and bullets in an old cast iron skillet. So there's always that possiblity...

Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:15:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By salsa:
Flax seed oil. I know I will get flamed because everyones grandmother used bacon fat and lard or whatever to season their CI for saying this. The very best thing bar NONE to reseason any cast iron is flax seed oil from the health food store. Invest some time and hit it six times heating to 400 F for an hour and let cool completely and repeat the steps until you have done it six times and it will give you non stick surface as good as teflon AND you can wash it even with dawn and not harm the season. It is all I do now and will not use another season ever as long I have flax seed oil. Google flax seed oil season and decide for yourself.


I concur. Although I have used coconut oil too. Most of what I have on hand is flax, coconut, and palm oil. No corn, vegetable, or canola.

Oh, and what's with these grey cast iron pans? Mine is black as coal now.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:15:22 PM EST
If you've got a really screwed up cast iron pan and want to start over, stick it in your oven and run the oven self cleaning cycle. Your pan will come out clean as a whistle and you can re-season however you want.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:20:44 PM EST
I bought a Lodge from WalMart to replace the skillet that "disappeared" in the divorce. The surface was rough and generally sucked. Being that I am a rather impatient guy and hate waiting, I decided to take a sander to my skillet. This left me with a really nice and smooth surface to begin with. I rubbed an obscene amount of lard on it, and used my grill outside to season the thing. Now its perfect, and really maintenance free.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:22:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/17/2012 5:22:38 PM EST by AZ_Sky]
Originally Posted By robertl:
If you've got a really screwed up cast iron pan and want to start over, stick it in your oven and run the oven self cleaning cycle. Your pan will come out clean as a whistle and you can re-season however you want.


I've done this before and yes it works great for starting over from scratch assuming no rust.
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:26:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By salsa:
Flax seed oil. I know I will get flamed because everyones grandmother used bacon fat and lard or whatever to season their CI for saying this. The very best thing bar NONE to reseason any cast iron is flax seed oil from the health food store. Invest some time and hit it six times heating to 400 F for an hour and let cool completely and repeat the steps until you have done it six times and it will give you non stick surface as good as teflon AND you can wash it even with dawn and not harm the season. It is all I do now and will not use another season ever as long I have flax seed oil. Google flax seed oil season and decide for yourself.


Pure fact. Flaxseed oil is best. Canola does very well
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:28:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By Illini75:
Originally Posted By salsa:
Flax seed oil. I know I will get flamed because everyones grandmother used bacon fat and lard or whatever to season their CI for saying this. The very best thing bar NONE to reseason any cast iron is flax seed oil from the health food store. Invest some time and hit it six times heating to 400 F for an hour and let cool completely and repeat the steps until you have done it six times and it will give you non stick surface as good as teflon AND you can wash it even with dawn and not harm the season. It is all I do now and will not use another season ever as long I have flax seed oil. Google flax seed oil season and decide for yourself.


Pure fact. Flaxseed oil is best. Canola does very well


But of course bacon fat is the supreme!
Link Posted: 11/17/2012 5:56:18 PM EST
Lots and lots of blackened redfish.

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