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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 3/27/2006 9:26:42 PM EDT
So we were watching a movie just a little while ago and all the sudden there was a bright flash and the screen went blank. It looked as if someone pushed the power button but it won't come back on. We had sound for a short while after the picture died, and now the green LED power light is blinking.

It's a 32" Phillips Stereo TV. Anyone know what would make a <2 year old TV die like that? Any price guesstimates as to repair costs? It's doubtful that it's still under warranty.

This sucks.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:27:43 PM EDT
Power surge possibly?

I doubt repairing it will be worth the costs.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:31:14 PM EDT
Throw it away, and DON'T buy another.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:33:36 PM EDT
Shoot it!
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:37:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PeteCO:
Throw it away, and DON'T buy another.


+1, I average less than 1 hour total of TV a week, mostly when I'm at other peoples places. (I do watch DVDs though)
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:38:39 PM EDT
Sounds like a bad picture tube, can be fixed but why bother? Buy HDTV, a 30-34" direct CRT is pretty reasonable money wise, has the best picture quality available,no burn-in or burn-out issues, and will be up to date for it's lifetime.

I bought a Philips 30" widescreen HDTV for $360 shipped last year, but after that experience you'll probably want to buy Japanese, they are a little bit more reliable I must admit, but I've had no problems with my philips so far.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:38:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PeteCO:
Throw it away, and DON'T buy another.



why waste a perfectly good TV?

that's what TANNERITE is for!
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:40:53 PM EDT
time for a plasma
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:43:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John91498:
time for a plasma


Except the life on plasma is rediculously short for the cost (only a few years) and theres the whole burn in problem...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:44:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sWs2:

Originally Posted By John91498:
time for a plasma


Except the life on plasma is rediculously short for the cost (only a few years) and theres the whole burn in problem...



maybe for the older plasmas, but the newer ones are rated at 60,000 plus hours...way more than the two years of that Phillips...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:45:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:

Originally Posted By PeteCO:
Throw it away, and DON'T buy another.



why waste a perfectly good TV?

that's what TANNERITE is for!



we used 1 1/2 pounds of Tannerite on an old Wooden Console TV on Sunday there was nothing left.
Screen toward enemy (opposite of us)

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:50:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John91498:
time for a plasma



Bet you were a big fan of 8-tracks and beta videotape too huh?

Plasma's a dead-end technology with significant problems, and they cost too damn much.

Next-generation flat displays are already on the market, in a couple years they'll be cheap, and they're far superior to plasma in every way.

CRT is the way to go at the moment, unless you just MUST have a big screen and can't wait a year or two, or pay the big bucks to be an early adopter.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:53:23 PM EDT
I had a Phillips TV not too long ago. Started developing a problem where it would turn itself on and just constantly turn the volume up. Eventually died, lasted maybe 2 years when it started getting problems and 5 or 6 years till it died. Phillips is crap, will never buy a TV from them again.

With very few HDTV channels and nothing else to really take advantage of it at least until Blueray/HD-DVD I think HDTV's are ungodly expensive.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:54:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By K2QB3:

Originally Posted By John91498:
time for a plasma



Bet you were a big fan of 8-tracks and beta videotape too huh?

Plasma's a dead-end technology with significant problems, and they cost too damn much.

Next-generation flat displays are already on the market, in a couple years they'll be cheap, and they're far superior to plasma in every way.

CRT is the way to go at the moment, unless you just MUST have a big screen and can't wait a year or two, or pay the big bucks to be an early adopter.



Yes, I am because I want it NOW. When better stuff comes along in a few years, I'll give the plasma to someone and get the latest and greatest. Kinda like getting a new car every few years...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:59:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 10:41:07 PM EDT by Tallbob]
Before you ditch it, do a little work on the phone and the net. One quick google search came up with a bad resistor. Get the model number and try to find a shop (not a big box house) that works on Phillips and give them a call. If it is a common problem, repair could be relatively cheap.

ETA: I'm sure you will, but get an estimate to see if you want to put that much into a tv that seems to have some issues
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:02:14 PM EDT
2nd K2QB3 comments concerning plasm. It's gotten better, but is still a limited tech, particularly when better stuff is coming out. I've heard organic-based LED (OLED) is on the way & it puts out significantly less emf than std. LED, which is currently the best bet for your $$$ at the current time. Will eventually drop for a 50-60" HiDef, if for no other reason than to take advantage of an Xbox360 or for movies, but I'll wait to see if OLED goes prime-time. In any case, a flat-screen LED will someday be in the offing.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:05:11 PM EDT
I have a question,what would it look like after a 7.62 x54 round?
Post pics. Please
It's toast in the power supply/high pot not worth it to fix.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:05:18 PM EDT
Damn and here I was expecting a pic of a TV with holes in it...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:05:29 PM EDT
If you wait for the "best," you'll always be waiting. Something will always come along to outperform whatever it is you're waiting for. Do I buy a 2006 tv when a better tv will come out in 2008? Well, if you wait for a 2008 tv, a 2010 tv will be better than a 2008 tv. Life's too short...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:10:50 PM EDT
The model number is 32PT5441/37. I have to wait until tomorrow to call the Phillips hotline. The FAQ on their page was listed second highest, so I assume it's a common problem. Pending the answers I get tomorrow I will look for a repair shop for it.

K2QB3 - where did you find one so cheap? Looking at newegg.com I see $500 being the lowest price and it's some brand that sounds like it came from Mars.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:21:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:

Originally Posted By PeteCO:
Throw it away, and DON'T buy another.



why waste a perfectly good TV?

that's what TANNERITE is for!




If only you spelled your name correctly.......tisk tisk.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:06:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Doc_Awesome:
The model number is 32PT5441/37. I have to wait until tomorrow to call the Phillips hotline. The FAQ on their page was listed second highest, so I assume it's a common problem. Pending the answers I get tomorrow I will look for a repair shop for it.

K2QB3 - where did you find one so cheap? Looking at newegg.com I see $500 being the lowest price and it's some brand that sounds like it came from Mars.




http://www.outlet.philips.com/b2c_redesign/catalog/categorieInPath.do?page=first&key=0/4190799E9A6F008D00000000828BD472/41907ABB9A6F008D00000000828BD472&shop=OUTLET

My TV is the one on the bottom, works great, no issues at all after a year.

First TV on the second page is basically the same model with an additional digital output for even less money.

They're refurbs, but mine was perfect out of the box, and that seems to be typical from what I've heard.

Philips are cheap, Sony is the best for CRTs, and a sony HD CRT is the finest picture quality available on any TV to date, but they cost.

Any CRT HDTV is going to need geometry adjustments once the guns break in, it isn't difficult to do so don't panic when you notice lines aren't straight after a while, once it's got a couple dozen hours on it the geometry will be stable.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:11:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 12:12:18 AM EDT by Sodie]
If it's the tube, chuck it.

But many times it's just some solder or a wire that burns out. The connections on the circuit boards aren't very well done and can fry easily. My Uncle repairs TV's for a living and he sometimes finds newer TV's on the curb that he can fix with just a couple hits with a solder gun. He has found big screens and quality brands like Sony out with the garbage that he has sucessfully repaired. If they can't be repaired easily, he just puts them in the trash. He once saw a 36" Sony Bigscreen on the curb but was driving his little Civic at the time and couldn't fit it in the hatchback. By the time he came back with a larger car, it was gone. It looked like it was only a couple years old and probably only needed some soldering.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:22:04 AM EDT
R.I.P.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:56:51 AM EDT
Did some searching on the net, looks like it's a problem in 99.9% of this model on the market. Sounds like it will cost almost as much as a new one at minimum. I'm thinking about picking up a new Sony WEGA or a cheap HD ready TV. Thoughts
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 1:33:31 AM EDT
You know my mind already, but I'll expound...

HD ready is plenty good enough, if you've got cable or satellite you don't need a tuner, my HD dish network reciever has an over-the-air tuner built in anyway, but you really do want HD, even if you don't have HD programming you'll notice an improvement, especially when you see DVDs in progressive mode.(SD programming tends to look pretty bad on fixed-pixel displays, another reason why CRTs are the best choice right now IMO)

Get a 16/9 screen, all the best programming is in that format now anyway, and soon it'll be everything.

Just decide what you want to spend and pick a brand and a size.

Speaking of size, here's an interesting issue with HDTV right now, since not everything is available in HD. Optimum viewing distance for SD is about 4-5 times the screen size, and if your eyes are good it's even farther, HD is much less, 1.5-2 times screen size. If you're watching a 30" TV this isn't a big problem, but if you're watching a 50" it can be really annoying going back and forth. This is one of the reasons I chose a small, inexpensive CRT, when all the programming I want to watch is available in HD in a few years I'll make the investment in a bigger screen, but for now the CRT meets all my needs better than anything else, and a lot cheaper.

If you don't plan on upgrading again any time soon, and you can afford it, the TV I'd recommend is the Sony 34" widescreen HDTV, but it's a lot more money than a philips or samsung or anything else really.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 3:35:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 3:36:28 AM EDT by Doc_Awesome]
I was thinking something along the lines of:

www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16850000279

I really doubt I want to spend more than that.
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