Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 11/27/2007 6:08:29 PM EDT
Being a fairly new do-it-your-selfer, but comming from a family of them and recently getting married and having my own house I have started to evaluate my current set of tools as I need to buy something for every project I undertake. So I ask the powers of arfcom what is the master list of must have tools, power or not, that no garage/workstation should be without.
Link Posted: 11/27/2007 6:21:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/27/2007 6:23:28 PM EDT by ColtRifle]
Really depends on what you want to do with them. Woodworking? Metalworking? Gunsmithing?


I'm going to assume that you want a general do-all set of tools.

You need a good hand saw and then a circular saw. Next buy a jig saw. Then look into a power compound miter saw. Then maybe a table saw. Basic levels, tape measures, angle measuring tools, hammers(framing and maybe a ball pein type), cordless drill then a corded drill

Buy a tool box first!! Does you no good to have lots of money tied up in tools and no way to keep them dry and clean. I'd recommend a good roll around but you can get by with smaller plastic boxes first.

Get a good air compressor. Get the largest you can afford/fit into your work area. Basic set of wrenches, sockets and so forth. I like Craftsman for that. Good warrantee and easy to use....Sears is all over the place. SK makes the best but you will pay for it and the warrantee is just as good as Craftsman. SnapOn is good but overpriced. You won't regret buying Craftsman sockets and wrenches and screwdrivers. Then start buying tools as you need them. I like to buy specialty tools as I have the money. That way, when I need them, I'll have them to use whenever I want and not have to buy them. Eventually you will want to purchase a good oxy/acyl torch set...expect to pay about $600 for the torch and bottles.

Thats a basic idea. Not all inclusive by no means but a good start. You could get set up with a good basic set of tools for about $2000...not including a fancy tool box. Don't let that scare you though. You can get started for about $500 with sockets and saws and basics. Once you have a basic set of tools, just buy a new tool with every paycheck...even if it's an inexpensive tool. Before you know it, you will have plenty of tools.

I started amassing tools about 8 years ago and now have probably $8-10k worth. I have a pretty decent collection but want more. It's like black rifle disease...can't stop!! Actually I have the BRD under control. It's the tools that are out of control!!
Link Posted: 11/27/2007 6:26:42 PM EDT
Tools make you want to build, BRD or home projects... it's still a dollar disease.
Link Posted: 11/27/2007 6:27:10 PM EDT
1) Cordless Drill/Driver
2) Exhaustive screw driver combo set
3) Tape measures
4) Levels
5) CLAMPS
6) At basic, a mechanic's tool set with assortment of sockets, both metric and standard
7) Multimeter (if you do any electrical work, and you will)
8) Good tool box
9) Corded or Cordless circular saw and blades
10)Lots of crescent and pipe wrenches

Can come in handy list:
1) At least a job site table saw - or contractors saw
2) Reciprocating saw
3) Jig saw
4) Fish Tape/Fish Sticks
5) Plumbers torch
6) Laser Levels and plumbs
Link Posted: 11/27/2007 6:57:42 PM EDT
Vice Grips
Channel Locks
Good screwdriver set
Hammer
Needle nose pliers
Band-aids
Aspirin

Link Posted: 11/27/2007 9:33:55 PM EDT
Pencil
Link Posted: 11/27/2007 9:47:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/27/2007 9:49:04 PM EDT by Waldo0506]
Yea get a corded circular saw even if your cordless kit has one in it.


-A cheap Skil saw with a diablo blade will cut like a cheap Skil saw with a diablo blade. Thats one nice cut. (seriously, it works great)

-you need a stud finder or a really good ear and a hammer

-a vise

-automotive work is easier with an air compressor

-a radio

-a 500-1000 watt dual head worklight on a tripod
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 12:05:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 12:27:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZW17:
A good multi-meter is a must have for any sort of electrical work.


The list is never ending.... My advice is to buy each tool as you need it and over the years you will acquire a good collection.


That is what I do. If I am going to do something that requires a tool I dont have I will do one of two things. If its something really oddball that I will likely never do again, I will rent/borrow the tool. If there is a chance the tool will come in handy down the road, I buy it.

Doesn't take long to acquire a basic set of tools for most applications this way.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 4:50:38 AM EDT
I'mm a remodeler so a sawzall is high on my list

Wait until closer to christmas when lowes and home depot get to trying to out-discounteach other

I buy all of my blades and tools the 2 weeks prior to and after christmas for the entire following year.

Examples from last year:

I bought a dewalt 16ga 18 volt straight nailer kit with the nailer, charger, 2 18volt xr+ batteries and a 18 volt 3 speed hammer drill on clearance for $179 ( I bought two)

I also bought four kits with a 14.4 hammerdrill, impact driver 2 xr+ batteries, charger and case for $150 each
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 10:21:46 AM EDT
BEER.


SCREW DRIVER WITH MULTIPLE HEADS.
I've found that a screwdriver set with one screw driver that accepts tons of bits has been really handy. Phillips and Flat Head screws come in all different sizes and depths where the blade of the screwdriver contacts the head and on some if you don't get the right bit you're gonna strip it.

SOCKET ADAPTERS
I've also found that Socket Adapters have become very handy. I usually keep a tray of misc sockets together but if I find one that fits and it's doesn't fit the socket I have 1/4 or 1/2 for a big torque wrench I'll stick the adapter on so I don't have to fiddle with switching rachets to fit the sockets.

T HANDLE ALLEN WRENCHES
A must have for anyone who works on a jap bike, The fold out ones always tend to bust my knuckles, but the T handles let you really get into tight spots and apply a lot more torque to either loosen or tighten those bolts.

ORGANIZATION
Not necessarily a tool, but a well kept and organized area saves a LOT of time and frustration when you know exactly what you need and know where it's at. Nothing pisses me off more than knowing I have something, not being able to find it for hours, then going to the hardware store to buy a duplicate.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 10:43:49 AM EDT
Everyone so, far has missed the combination square. This is a 12 inch rigid steel scale with a sliding head that makes angles of 90 and 45 degrees. You use it to mark cuts, and as a depth gauge, etc. Also avaliable are protractor, and center heads. These last two heads are nice to have, but not essential.

A good set of woodworking chisels 1/4" to 1" or 1-1/4". You will also want to get a 1" Stanley chisel with the steel button on the handle. This is your beater chisel. You use your beater chisel for those jobs where you might hit a nail, or need to make a rough cut-out. The beater chisel is sharpened with a belt sander.


A mallet (rawhide or wood) for your good chisels. Use an ordinary hammer for the beater.

Those are my additions to the list.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 11:49:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glockaboom:
ORGANIZATION
Not necessarily a tool, but a well kept and organized area saves a LOT of time and frustration when you know exactly what you need and know where it's at. Nothing pisses me off more than knowing I have something, not being able to find it for hours, then going to the hardware store to buy a duplicate.


Thats one of the most important things I need to work on, the garage is a mess, I can find most things, not everything, but it sucks having to climb over alot of stuff to find that One tool I need, and then if I try to tell other people where it is HA

Really important tool to have is a sturdy work table of some sort, I do most of my work on a Recycle bin, and it does not make life easy for me.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 12:53:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ArimoDave:
Everyone so, far has missed the combination square. This is a 12 inch rigid steel scale with a sliding head that makes angles of 90 and 45 degrees. You use it to mark cuts, and as a depth gauge, etc. Also avaliable are protractor, and center heads. These last two heads are nice to have, but not essential.



Too much work. Just eyeball for square.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 1:02:51 PM EDT
Make sure you buy multiples of every hand tool, especially sockets and combination wrenches. You can never have too many.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 4:48:15 PM EDT
FYI - the tool guys at Sears work on commission; you can usually haggle some.

Get a good cordless drill and some good hand tools (wrenches, screwdrivers, sockets, etc.). Buy other stuff as you need it (or as you find deals).
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 8:08:50 PM EDT
If getting used tools doesn't bother you check out the pawn shops. You can haggle there as well. I'd stay away from the electrical stuff as there is no warranties but hey a socket is a socket and hammer a hammer. I'm a cheap bastid.
Link Posted: 11/29/2007 1:59:54 PM EDT
Another vote for the sawzall. I've had several and my favorite is the cheap makita.
Link Posted: 11/29/2007 5:37:14 PM EDT
I only need 2 tools!
If it is rusted solid and won't move all, but should, all I need is some wd-40
If it is loose and squeeky and shouldn't move, all I need is some duct tape.

Link Posted: 12/2/2007 4:17:52 PM EDT
Gearwrench ratcheting wrenches. The best thing that has ever happened to me.....EVER
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 6:12:41 PM EDT
Speed Square and Framing Square.

Chaulk Box, Mason's Line, and a Plumb Bob
Top Top