Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 4/18/2017 9:42:25 AM EST
I like to fish for trout and trout like to eat bugs.

I don't know enough about bugs, so I took two wooden dowels about 4 feet long and stapled a section of nylon window screen between them.

I figured with my seine net I could catch and hopefully identify the larvae of insects and that would help me in my quest for trout.

For the hell of it I decided to sample a vernal pool (not a place you would find trout). A vernal pool is a depression in the ground that fills up with water in the spring. It then usually dries out in the summer, so the denizens of a vernal pool are on a tight schedule.

The water was brown from the tannin of the leaves that lined the pool. I was able to snag a good number of different species. Caddis larvae, small snails, mosquito larvae, midge larvae, etc.

The surprise was creatures that were 1/2 to 1 inch in length. They had pink gills and a slender body. I later identified them as Fairy Shrimp.

Attachment Attached File


Not my picture, but you can get an idea of what they look like.

I don't normally think of freshwater shrimp, let alone shrimp in New Hampshire.

You crazy kids probably know fairy shrimp by another name: Sea Monkeys.

May 16 is National Sea Monkey day, incidentally.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:43:37 AM EST
Go back and see if you can find their castle.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:45:31 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PikeSlayer:
Go back and see if you can find their castle.
View Quote
I respect their privacy.

Besides, the vernal pool was kinda icky.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:02:04 AM EST
Few more of them and you can have a nice shrimp cocktail
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:06:40 AM EST
Neat!
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:12:41 AM EST
Match the hatch.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:15:25 AM EST
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:08:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:32:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Vernal pools = protected wetlands
View Quote
Deal with those here in Ca in the housing business. Lots of protected mitigation land that has to be set aside to build houses in certain cities.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:37:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By akrado:
Few more of them and you can have a nice shrimp cocktail
View Quote
"Shrimp is the fruit of the sea. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, saute it. There’s shrimp-kabobs, shrimp creole, shrimp gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There’s pineapple shrimp, lemon shrimp, coconut shrimp, pepper shrimp, shrimp soup, shrimp stew, shrimp salad, shrimp and potatoes, shrimp burger, shrimp sandwich. That, that’s about it.”



Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:48:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Vernal pools = protected wetlands
View Quote
We EPA now.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:55:11 PM EST
Scuds are cool too....
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 2:56:08 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Vernal pools = protected wetlands
View Quote
Figures the EPA extended the denizens of the Vernal Pool a professional courtesy.

Bloodsuckers and bottom feeders have to stick together!
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:02:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/18/2017 3:16:58 PM EST by BillythePoet]
I have it on good authority that they can be taught tricks.

Link Posted: 4/19/2017 5:39:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By Cheesebeast:
I like to fish for trout and trout like to eat bugs.

I don't know enough about bugs, so I took two wooden dowels about 4 feet long and stapled a section of nylon window screen between them.

I figured with my seine net I could catch and hopefully identify the larvae of insects and that would help me in my quest for trout.

For the hell of it I decided to sample a vernal pool (not a place you would find trout). A vernal pool is a depression in the ground that fills up with water in the spring. It then usually dries out in the summer, so the denizens of a vernal pool are on a tight schedule.

The water was brown from the tannin of the leaves that lined the pool. I was able to snag a good number of different species. Caddis larvae, small snails, mosquito larvae, midge larvae, etc.

The surprise was creatures that were 1/2 to 1 inch in length. They had pink gills and a slender body. I later identified them as Fairy Shrimp.

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/41569/shrimp-190004.JPG

Not my picture, but you can get an idea of what they look like.

I don't normally think of freshwater shrimp, let alone shrimp in New Hampshire.

You crazy kids probably know fairy shrimp by another name: Sea Monkeys.

May 16 is National Sea Monkey day, incidentally.
View Quote


Where did you catch those? I'd love to catch wild ones. I'm fascinated by vernal pools. The closest I've gotten is ordering eggs online from Arizona Fairy Shrimp.

I raised some Red-tail Fairy Shrimp in a 10-gallon aquarium, feeding them yeast and spirulina. They produced eggs and that's what I'm seeing in your picture as well. I don't know if they are viable as I dried out the aquarium once they died but I haven't rehydrated them yet to see if they will hatch. The eggs can survive drying and UV light as in desert regions.

More interesting than the shrimp are Daphnia since they reproduce exponentially with many generations being formed. If you're interested in keeping Daphnia Magna, the largest of the species growing up to 5mm, I can mail you some in a month or so with instructions on how to raise them. Shoot me an IM if interested.

The shrimp and Daphnia can't tolerate bubbles as they cause them to float to the surface, so you would never find them with trout in streams.

Daphnia Magna

Link Posted: 4/19/2017 5:51:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By C-4:


Where did you catch those? I'd love to catch wild ones. I'm fascinated by vernal pools. The closest I've gotten is ordering eggs online from Arizona Fairy Shrimp.

I raised some Red-tail Fairy Shrimp in a 10-gallon aquarium, feeding them yeast and spirulina. They produced eggs and that's what I'm seeing in your picture as well. I don't know if they are viable as I dried out the aquarium once they died but I haven't rehydrated them yet to see if they will hatch. The eggs can survive drying and UV light as in desert regions.

More interesting than the shrimp are Daphnia since they reproduce exponentially with many generations being formed. If you're interested in keeping Daphnia Magna, the largest of the species growing up to 5mm, I can mail you some in a month or so with instructions on how to raise them. Shoot me an IM if interested.

The shrimp and Daphnia can't tolerate bubbles as they cause them to float to the surface, so you would never find them with trout in streams.

Daphnia Magna

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c2/Daphnia_magna_asexual.jpg
View Quote
COOL! I found the fairy shrimp in a vernal pool in Litchfield, NH. It was on the property of a school my wife teaches at. If the temperatures are warm enough your chances of finding Fairy Shrimp in other vernal pools in NH are pretty good from what I have been reading.

The piece of window screen was big enough to catch the wee beasties before they could swim away.

The pool I caught them in was not very deep- 1 to 2 feet deep. The water temperature was pretty high for this reason, so if you don't find much on your first try keep checking back.

I guess ducks like to eat the shrimp, so if you see a mallard or two in the vernal pool it might be a good indicator that shrimp are present.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 11:07:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cheesebeast:


COOL! I found the fairy shrimp in a vernal pool in Litchfield, NH. It was on the property of a school my wife teaches at. If the temperatures are warm enough your chances of finding Fairy Shrimp in other vernal pools in NH are pretty good from what I have been reading.

The piece of window screen was big enough to catch the wee beasties before they could swim away.

The pool I caught them in was not very deep- 1 to 2 feet deep. The water temperature was pretty high for this reason, so if you don't find much on your first try keep checking back.

I guess ducks like to eat the shrimp, so if you see a mallard or two in the vernal pool it might be a good indicator that shrimp are present.
View Quote
Great. That's not too far from me.
Top Top