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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/11/2002 4:50:46 PM EST
I got a Gary Fisher Kaitai mtn bike, and I'm trying to decide if it'd be worth putting disk brakes on it. I'd hafta replace the wheels, and then add the disks and calipers. $400, maybe. I'm wondering if any of you have experience with disk brakes on a mtn bike, and whether they are worth the $$$$. Here's a pic... [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid23/pbf22292b4a265302b905bf66a4a06d26/fd9b0d6e.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 5:02:46 PM EST
The manual disk brakes work good. great in the rain. Do not bother with the hydraulic disk brakes unless you plan on doing some very competitive racing.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 5:11:30 PM EST
sorry to Hi-jack post. [:D] For $550 you can buy this Cannondale F400 with accessaries. Less than 8hrs on bike.[:D] No scratches. pumps, tools, helmet, patches, bottles, cages, etc. [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Boomholzer%2FIM000126%2EJPG[/img]
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 5:24:10 PM EST
They are cool, but due to the hassle I would wait till you upgrade to a new bike.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 5:29:35 PM EST
Unless you are doing any serious downhill riding, probably not. Get yourself some XTR or Avid brakes and you will be a-ok. However, a nice set of rims is the most important upgrade that can be made to a bike. I have a Specialized FSR Pro and upgraded to Crossmax rims, huge difference. I did stick with XTR brakes and have never had a problem. Even in rain, they will still throw you over the handle bars....
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 5:32:17 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 6:01:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By ilikelegs; How much does it weigh ? Is it carbon graphite ? Can you hold it out with one arm ?
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i know little about mtn bikes. It is aluminum or a aluminum alloy. It is the older Cannondale CAD2 frame. New F400s have the CAAD3 frame, just a different geometry. It is a light-weight bike but not one handed stiff arm light. You have pay >$1500 for that stuff. This is a good entry-level bike. I paid $850 for the bike and accessaries new.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 6:01:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2002 6:06:27 PM EST by Corey]
I'm a diehard mtn. biker at heart, but due to job, family and home have been converted to road biking out of necessity. I now ride my $249 Giant commuter mtn. bike (GREAT bike for the money) more than my $1,800 road and mountain bikes. My mountain biking now generally consists of "city riding." Basically, doing 5+ foot drops off of walls, riding ladders constructed 10+ feet off the ground in a local park, steep descents down bluffs, jumping, stairs, etc. -- basically playing on the techinical terrain a city can offer. I've ridden centuries on my road bike and generally just love those simple little machines. That's my background, FWIW. I'm as obsessive about bikes as I am about guns. Unfortunately right now I don't have the time to do much riding. I actually shoot more these days because it's more time efficient than a 3 hours ride, particularly when I'm commuting frequently to work. My mountain bike is an older but well maintainied Gary Fisher Supercaliber (hardtail) that I've added a 4" travel Manitou X-Vert fork to. A very nice setup for my riding. It has Shimano XT sidepull brakes (rim brakes). They work very well for everything that I've been able to throw at them (which is some pretty technical riding). That being said, the following are facts: 1. [b]Hydraulic[/b] disk brakes from Hayes, Shimano, etc. are [b]better[/b] than the best sidepull brakes. They are more powerful stoppers and don't trash your rim in bad conditions. (I haven't worn through mine yet, and though it's getting rough it is still strong and true.) EDITED due to cut and paste error.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 6:02:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2002 6:46:11 PM EST by Corey]
continued... 2. [b]Cable-actuated[/b] disk brakes have been generally [b]below or equal to[/b] the best sidepull brakes in performance. Shimano, Hayes, Avid, and others [b]have been improving[/b] them in their latest incarnations. Cable brakes are cheaper and easier to maintain than hydraulics, but [b]don't[/b] offer the sheer pucker power of hydraulics, though that doesn't mean they won't some day. The best ones are getting close. 3. [b]Sidepull[/b] brakes are [b]all the brake that 90% of riders need[/b]. [b]garandman[/b]: It's important to note that it is [b]extremely cost-inefficient[/b] to upgrade a side pull bike to disks, and that's assuming that all the mounts are in place. Unless you're riding a super high end frame (say an Intense, or high end production bike that you love), I would recommend riding your sidepulls. Quite honestly, I'm not sure that your fork is compatible with disks, which means probably $200-300 for a fork alone. I'd guess that your estimate of $400 to upgrade might be on the low side when all is said and done. Given the base price of your bike, it is probably better to sell your bike and buy a stock disk bike -- but I'd recommend against that as well (see below). Your bike is a great ride. Give the industry another few years to sort out disks, see what kind of improvements they've made in full suspension designs (another extremely long thread...), and then buy a full suspension with disks. You'll be glad that you have a hardtail in your stable. Unless you're riding down ski hills at 40+ mph (yes, BTDT too [:D] ), you don't need disks. And I managed just fine on rim brakes. Upgrade your fork first, getting one with hydraulic rebound damping. But even that isn't necessary unless you're doing some pretty serious riding. In which case you'll be replacing a lot of things in about 6 months. Ride. Have fun. Screw the equipement race. Sorry about the rambling. HTH EDITED to fix code typo.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 6:16:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2002 6:48:35 PM EST by Corey]
Awe, heck, a little show and tell. [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Corey%2F00%5F00015%2Ejpg[/img] This bike has seen A LOT of abuse. Though I ride pretty light and replace parts when needed. At some point I'll get a 32 pound freeride full suspension bike, but this thing weighs around 27.5 pounds with meaty tires, riser bar, long travel fork, etc. It started life as a 24.5 pound cross country bike. EDITED to say the bike in the background is my LeMond Zurich. First time I rode a road bike I knocked all my front teeth out (long story). I bought this bike simply because it was a looker. The Reynolds 853 tubing gives a great ride. My wife and I love our road rides together. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 7:36:09 PM EST
First, you've got to lose the reflectors, very uncool. Besides, unnecessary rotating weight and major Fred factor. The Fisher Kaitai is a great bike but not worth the upgrade to discs and wheels. Are you planning to ride this on bike paths, or as a mountain bike on trails? Will you need light weight for cross country, or do you prefer a solid trail bike? Keep the Kaitai like it is, except remove those reflectors. Sell it or save up about $1500 and you'll have more choices and can get your discs on a new ride. Avid mechanicals, Shimano XT hydraulic, or Hayes hydraulic are good choices and can be had on $1200-$1500 bikes.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 7:59:03 PM EST
My Mtn bike philosophy is, keep it simple-sweet... Bought my Trek 7000 several years ago, and have never had a problem with anything on the bike... I've ridden the hell out of it, and the factory rim-brakes still work fine... Anything you do to the bike, try to go ultra-light... My bike has the Aluminum alloy tube frame, and only weighs around 22lbs... The carbon-fiber version is only around 21.5 lbs... I still haven't even convinced myself to add the extra weight of a front shock... IMHO, discs are overkill for the average trail rider...
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 8:45:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2002 8:50:26 PM EST by magnum_99]
Unless you are riding in muddy/wet conditions constantly or are a SERIOUS downhiller, discs are just overkill. Most hydraulics are a pain to set up and keep bled; not to mention the intial cost. Avid mechanical discs work great and stop just as well. But, good v-brakes (rim brakes) will have 98% of the stopping power of discs, are much lighter, and are a no-brainer to maintain. If you just ride cross-country, stick with v-brakes. I recommend the Avid Single Digit 7s or Ti. They will make the bike endo if you want (no lack of power), don't squeal, last a long time, and are pretty easy on the rims. Plus, they are cheap, and again, much lighter than disc setups. If you just want new wheels, then go for a standard (non-disc) version that is strong and light. If you want REAL light and high-end try here--[url]www.speeddream.com[/url] My set weighs 1467 grams (with rim tape) and cost me about $550. I weigh 200lbs. and over a year later they have yet to need truing (a lot of fast, rocky riding too). Light wheels are the single best upgrade to a bike you can make (less unsprung weight). You will notice an immediate difference (in acceleration/handling) whereas you may not notice any difference on a day-to-day basis with disc brakes. .02 Edited to add: The main justification for disc brakes right now is better modulation, NOT stopping power (some discs don't even have much of that until you play around with different pads and compounds). Any *good* rim brake will exceed the ability of the tire to hook up. Any more power than that is wasted. Also, again, discs seem to work a little better in wet and muddy conditions.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 9:06:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/11/2002 9:07:42 PM EST by pdxshooter]
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art: My Mtn bike philosophy is, keep it simple-sweet... IMHO, discs are overkill for the average trail rider...
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Overkill? You probably got an arsenal that would make a small army blush. My philosophy: Excess is best. [}:D] Do you [b]need[/b] disc brakes? Hell no! The list of people who [i]need[/i] disc brakes on a [b]bicycle[/b] is short. The real question is: Do you want them? That's the real question. [:)]
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 9:35:15 PM EST
I've got a Zurich too. Nice bikes. I like the positioning you get with the long top tube. Handling is pretty good, slightly too quick for my taste. I had an Eddy I just loved; above 20 mph in a pack or on a fast descent you could do no wrong; the thing was on rails. The Zurich is really remarkably stiff for an 853 frame in a 61 cm.
Link Posted: 7/11/2002 9:39:55 PM EST
Overkill? You probably got an arsenal that would make a small army blush. My philosophy: Excess is best. [}:D] Do you [b]need[/b] disc brakes? Hell no! The list of people who [i]need[/i] disc brakes on a [b]bicycle[/b] is short. The real question is: Do you want them? That's the real question. [:)]
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Yeah, but on a bike where light makes right, less really is more I'm afraid. Discs look neat, are techo-cool, but weigh a ton (relatively speaking), cost mucho bucks (especially where the money could be better spent elswhere) and don't really offer that much extra performance for 99% of riders. Garandman, If you already had a $3500, Ti FS bike with all the lightweight fixins and could afford discs, well why not. But as upgrades go on a Katai hardtail, stick to new wheels or maybe a new fork. (something where you'll get a big benefit for the money and effort).
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:18:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By punkatomic: First, you've got to lose the reflectors, very uncool. Besides, unnecessary rotating weight and major Fred factor.
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[:I] [BD] They are GONE - tonite.
Are you planning to ride this on bike paths, or as a mountain bike on trails? Will you need light weight for cross country, or do you prefer a solid trail bike?
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Right now I'm sticking to pavement and light trails, but my intent is to work my way up (I'm 6'4" and 260 lbs, so I've got some "undertall" issues [BD]) I'm planning on just a solid trail bike. Can anyone make suggestions on new rims, and a new fork? What sould I be looking for, and how much should I spend?/ (my philosophy is to get mid-range quality products. "Cheap" usually means rip-off, but so does "high-end." )
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:40:12 AM EST
Here's my bike. [img]http://webpages.charter.net/jeff.hoeft/pics/VIP2.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 3:53:12 AM EST
I do adventure races and LOTS of mountain biking! I've got 18 miles of trails right out my front door! I ride a carbon EPX Terrashark. I have Magura Louise Hydraulic brakes. They stop great and are very smooth ONCE YOU GET THEM TUNED IN! As far as a casual rider goes I would say they are more trouble than they're worth! I hope to get Avid Mechanicals next after I wear the Maguras out! If you're ever near Hotlanta let me know and we'll go shoot and ride!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 4:46:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 4:49:43 AM EST by Green_Canoe]
One quick fix I have not seen yet: If your stock tires have a steel bead replace them with Kevlar bead tires. Big savings on the rotating weight and relatively cheap and quick to add on. I agree with the don't buy it crowd. For the riding you describe you would spend a lot of money for little or no perceived gain. Focus on rotating weight and maybe suspension if it doesn't do what you think it should. If your present brakes are not effective enough, have them adjusted by a good shop and / or get new pads. There is no reason the stock brakes on a bike of that level should not do everything you ask of them. Of course disk brakes do look cool; but as stated earlier, the reflectors cut into the cool factor. [:)] Now, if you are riding on the road at night you may want to leave them on. I don't want you to meet your maker prematurely. [;)]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 5:09:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 5:16:34 AM EST by ZOG]
Discs are the only way to go on a new bike. On an older refit situation, do it, but do it as inexpensively as you can. Here's what I did: Bike: 97 Trek carbon Y33 full suspension. I was on a blast email list from Nashbar and saw a set (F&R) of Grimeca 4 piston discs on a returned item list for $110. Seemed like a great deal and Nashbar is very liberal about retuning things, so I took the chance and bought them right away. Next I had to find new Disc hubbed wheels. I wasn't sure if I wanted light weight XC or a little more substantial freeride(heavier duty). New you could pick up something basic for $150-200. You could easily spend $500+ for high end wheels. I ended up buying 2 sets of wheels, one on ebay and one in the classifieds on MTBR.com (Mountain Bike Review) I spent less than $200 for both sets. One is XC the other is Free Ride, both have sealed bearing hubs and were in great shape. I was lucky I found some good deals but they are out there if you know where to look. This is what I would do if I were in your situation; First be sure your frame and fork will accept disc brake calipers. Next determine how much you want to spend. If you want to go as cheaply as possible buy a set of Grimeca 9's off Ebay for $25 each; these are mechanical and you will use your existing V brake levers, you'll need new cables. There are a couple of bike shops that sell these on Ebay frequently,(do a search on Ebay under bikes for "disc". While I don't recommend buying used wheels I was careful and did get great deals. As it is getting near the end on the bike selling season there are lots of deals from the mail order/web stores for wheels, try some of these places: Cambria, Price Point, SuperGo, Nashbar, and go to MTBR.com for others. Also go to ComparisonPricing.com to compare some bike component prices. The last caveat for you is the installation part. If you have to pay an LBS (local bike shop) to install this can cost you alot! If you wrench your own bike, disc's aren't that difficult to install, the setup af the caliper can be time consuming because you have to use shims to center the caliper over the rotor. Use RED Loctite #271 to mount the caliper and the rotor, because of the heat generated in stopping. Go to the forums for Brakes at MTBR.com for more info.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 5:19:47 AM EST
ZOG - Thanks for the detailed heads-up. It was excellent. Thus far, I think I'm happy enuf with my brakes as is. That may change as I do more offroading. How would you rate the standard Bontrager wheels and Judy XC fork that came stock on my bike??? I have no specific complaints - just looking to learn.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 5:32:19 AM EST
garandman, Check out the following site: [url]www.mtbr.com[/url]. It has a lot of product reviews from riders. Just about any Mtn. Bike product is rated there. They also have a forums section and many other areas of good info. On a side note, does your frame and fork have the mounting points to mount disk brakes? If you buy disk brakes, you will have to buy new wheels with hubs that can mount the rotor. If your V-brakes or cantilever brakes are weak, you might try one of the brake boosters to see if it helps. That's a relatively inexpensive option that might give you better braking power. Good luck with what you go with, and have fun riding!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 5:38:31 AM EST
Arc - I bought the Kaitai because it had caliper mounts front and rear for disks. What is this magical elixir called "brake boosters" you refer to??? Honestly, I was prolly looking at disks primarily for the "gee whiz" factor. I really need to get offroad, and see if the wet rims serious degrades braking power. I've had ATV's with drum brakes, and ATV's with disk brakes. Thank you very much, but I prefer the disk brakes!!!! [:D] I was figgering same would be true in the mtn bike world.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 5:47:15 AM EST
The brake boosters are basically horseshoe shaped aluminum or carbon fiber pieces that you bolt over the brakes that are supposed to lessen frame flex. Some bikes on the back end can have excessive flex between the chainstays which robs you of braking power. I think it might also be an issue with suspension forks too. SOme people seem to like them and say they work. I have no experience with them, but they are usually about $20, so it might be worth just giving it a shot to see if it gives you any better braking power. If you look them up on the site, there should be a picture of one. I would say spend some time reading different reviews over there. That can be dangerous though because I have found myself wanting stuff that I probably don't need.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 6:17:17 AM EST
Best bike for the money: [img]http://www.radford.edu/~tczamansk/12.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 6:26:52 AM EST
The bike you have now is a quality ride and will provide you with all you need! While it is a ton of fun to tinker with your bike, I would recommend against any upgrades until you start getting more miles under you. As has been pointed out, upgrading your Kaitai will not be cost efficient. Best to ride it 2-3 seasons and save for an entirely new ride. By then you will have a much better idea of what you want and how much it costs. MTBR can be a great resource but you have to learn to recognize reviews from people who ride (check the 'similar items' used in the past) and ignore posts by people who are just jerking themselves off over their new chi-chi parts. IMO: The more concerned you are with the bike, the less joy riding and nature will bring you. Lube your chain, check your tire pressure, and have fun.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 6:47:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By magnum_99: Edited to add: The main justification for disc brakes right now is better modulation, NOT stopping power (some discs don't even have much of that until you play around with different pads and compounds). Any *good* rim brake will exceed the ability of the tire to hook up. Any more power than that is wasted. Also, again, discs seem to work a little better in wet and muddy conditions.
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I agree with this statement.
Originally posted by garandman: Can anyone make suggestions on new rims, and a new fork?
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There are a number of choices out there. You can get year old closeouts through Nashbar super cheap. Heck, IIRC my Manitou X-Vert cost around $385 or so new through Nashbar but one year later I saw the same fork new for $200 or so. Regardless of whether you get a Manitou, Rock Shox, or Marzocchi, just make sure that you have rebound damping. Undamped forks jump around too much, and rebound damping is what will take care of that problem. Also make sure that you get the right spring (unless it's air sprung) for your weight. Most forks come stock for riders in the 150-175 pound range. You'd have too much sag on stock springs -- in fact, you might even be bottoming them out at 260 pounds. You'll need the heaviest springs available. Finally, because you're a clydesdale, you should focus on [b]strong[/b] and [b]stiff[/b]. Don't worry so much about lightweight. Get a fork that is stiff and setup properly for your weight. Now I get to read all the posts that I've missed and have probably already covered these points. [:D] PS Go to [url]www.mtbr.com[/url] for more info as well as cheap closeouts.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 6:49:20 AM EST
Right now I'm sticking to pavement and light trails, but my intent is to work my way up (I'm 6'4" and 260 lbs, so I've got some "undertall" issues [BD]) I'm planning on just a solid trail bike. Can anyone make suggestions on new rims, and a new fork? What sould I be looking for, and how much should I spend?/ (my philosophy is to get mid-range quality products. "Cheap" usually means rip-off, but so does "high-end." )
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Garandman, I bought a 2001 Fisher Kaitai last year for a youngster just getting into the sport so I have experience with this particular bike. Your height and weight are definitely issues, but the bike is strong. You must have it in extra large size, I presume, since the bike looks normal. Telling me what type of riding is helpful. The wheels and fork can be upgraded due to your weight which is more than what the bike is really designed for, the frame can take it but the OEM wheels suffer. Wheels are strongest when spoke count is high and lacing is cross three or cross four pattern, avoid radial lacing which you'll find on your present front wheel. Go with 32 hole freeride wheels for ultimate strength, you'll have heavier but stronger wheels than OEM's but they'll last plus you'll have an extra wheelset with slick road tires for trips to the store. On forks, go with a Black Elite for about $250 or a Marzocchi Bomber Z2 Atom Race for $270 (Supergo prices). Total upgrade for wheels and fork here is about $600. Ouch!! My suggestion is just upgrade the wheels, leave the fork and change out the crankset and bottom bracket to Shimano LX. Budget $200 for the wheels and $80 for the Crankset/BB.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 7:06:49 AM EST
I don't have any specific experience with the wheels on your bike, but Bontrager makes some of the best mtn. bike OEM wheels out there. Your Judy fork, if setup with heavier springs to match your weight, should be all the fork you need. I don't know if it has rebound damping, but wouldn't really worry too much about it. If you're bent on spending money, I'd go with a fork that has rebound damping (presuming yours doesn't have it) over a new wheelset. But, as you're just getting into it, why not ride and bike and see what breaks? I'd hate to see you dump $300 into wheels or a fork only to have major drivetrain issues later on. Then, next thing you know, you have $1,300+ stuck into a bike that isn't worth the parts hung on it. After a little research, I think I found out that your bike might have the Judy C. IIRC my friend has this fork on a Specialized and it does have rebound damping. You should be able to see a cap that adjusts the valve. When you play around with it, you'll be able to see the rebound being slowed and controlled allowing for either a faster or slower rebound. Here's some of the Mtbr.com reviews of your bike. Take some with a grain of salt (as stated), but there is some good general information in there. [url]http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Bike_hardtail/product_19452.shtml[/url] Heck, it's a $750 bike. I personally think that price point is where you start to get really good bikes. They are durable and strike a good balance between light, strong and good value. After more thought and research, I've come to the following conclusion: [b]If your fork is setup to handle your weight, just ride the bike as is. It's a better bike than most entry level riders start with and will be a great hardtail when you get a FS bike a few years down the road.[/b] This bike doesn't need any upgrades to be a great all around bike.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 7:16:31 AM EST
Oh yeah, I just found this comment in the reviews:
The bike rides wonderfully, especially after I had the front springs switched to the firm ones (I am 6'00" and 225lbs).
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My friend is 200+ pounds and his fork is too soft for him with the stock spring. Look into either the stock Rock Shox or aftermarket Speed Springs for your weight (probably the extra firm springs). Most people I've talked to about upgrades on a bike like this would say "upgrade as things break." And if you ride it aggressively off road, things will break. Buy some more ammo. Or an XD2000. Maybe a new upper? Some Wilson 47D's. A new holster from Lou Alessi. An Aimpoint. I could go on spending your money all day if you let me.... [:D]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 7:19:52 AM EST
Hold on! Stop the presses! Ever thought about [b]clipless pedals and shoes[/b]? You should be able to get a nice set of Shimano SPD's or Time Attacks and a high end (i.e., stiff sole) set of shoes for around $250 or so. [b]This is the single best upgrade you could make[/b]. And I also think that it's easier to learn clipless right away than learn toestraps and then have to "relearn" later. I'll shutup now. [%|]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 8:02:17 AM EST
Corey - I read the reviews, adn the one thing to come thru pretty consistently was that the seat sux. I bought an aftermarket seat, and switched that out BEFORE the bike ever came home from teh shop. Clipless pedals scare me. I hafta get more seat time and riding confidence BEFORE I tie my feet to the pedals. Thanks to your (and others) comments, I'm gonna leave well enuf alone, until stuff starts breaking. I'll spend my money on maintenance and tuning, and if I feel the need later on, brakes that will work better in the wet stuff (non-disc).
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 8:20:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 8:22:35 AM EST by CAMPYBOB]
[img]http://webpages.charter.net/jeff.hoeft/pics/VIP2.jpg[/img] may ernesto colnago smile down upon you. may tulio campagnolo bless you with tailwinds for all your days! roadies do it in the street! sorry...thought this was an ak-roadbike vs ar-mountainbike post! oops! coming from an old fart that still rides sew-up tires. remember, any hub mounted brake will put increased stress on your spokes. personally, unless you are entering downhill/slalom events, disc brakes are a waste of weight. edited to add: how "short" are you? that colnago must be a 52 cm c to t?
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 8:34:09 AM EST
I'll start by saying that I'm a bit of a retrogrouch when it comes to mountain biking. If you do mostly high speed downhill riding or wet, muddy or otherwise lousy conditions, then disc brakes are definitely a great idea, otherwise, your better off spending the money shaving some weight off your bike and making it an easier ride.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 9:40:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 9:43:54 AM EST by ipschoser1]
Originally Posted By garandman: I got a Gary Fisher Kaitai mtn bike, and I'm trying to decide if it'd be worth putting disk brakes on it.
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A few months ago I put Avid mechanical discs on my Specialized FSR. They are a big improvement over rim brakes especially in wet weather. I can do a max performance stop from say 10 - 15 MPH and with two fingers pull the rear wheel off the ground with my butt as far over the rear tire as possible! If you don't let off it'll put you on your head. Discs are great on steep shutes. Advantages include: Cool factor (important), less lever force required to stop, easier wheel change. Disadvantages include: cost (for upgrade) and increased weight. Supergo has Hayes mechanicals on sale right now for $89 per front/rear set! That's half price. Disc wheelsets can be had online for less than $200. Try [url]www.supergo.com[/url] and [url]www.pricepoint.com[/url].
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 10:43:58 AM EST
Originally Posted By Corey: Hold on! Stop the presses! Ever thought about [b]clipless pedals and shoes[/b]? You should be able to get a nice set of Shimano SPD's or Time Attacks and a high end (i.e., stiff sole) set of shoes for around $250 or so. [b]This is the single best upgrade you could make[/b]. And I also think that it's easier to learn clipless right away than learn toestraps and then have to "relearn" later. I'll shutup now. [%|]
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Good point. I don't even think of clipless anymore NOT being on a bike. Yes, clipless is THE single best upgrade you can make that will affect your riding style. Hands down. Wheels are likely the best true hardware upgrade--forks next. If you ride rough terrain and not just smooth double-track or surface streets, a new fork that can handle your weight and riding style is a GREAT upgrade to make. In fact, after going clipless, and before wheels, I replaced the crappy Rockshox Jett fork with a quality Marzocchi Z-2 Atom 80 fork. I recommend it highly (or the 2001 Atom Race--same fork, different year--about $275 online right now). They can be upgraded with heavier springs (to match your weight) for $35.00 and you can do it yourself if you can use a ratchet. This fork is stiff, plush in travel, durable, has rebound adjustment that really works, and is not really that heavy considering it is a coil/oil fork. I have a 2000 Fisher Aquila that is very similiar to your Kaitai and I too am large-- 6'3" and about 205-- so these recommendations apply pretty well to your setup.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 10:54:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By garandman: shop. Clipless pedals scare me. I hafta get more seat time and riding confidence BEFORE I tie my feet to the pedals.
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Here's a thought though. Clipless are a little scary, but just do it. After about a week (3-4 rides) (no kidding) you will come out automatically. They are actually SAFER than toe clips. Can you really get out of properly tightened toe clips quickly? Ususally not. To be really effective, toe clips must be cinched down hard. I could never get out then and subsequently left them somewaht loose (not to mention they didn't really fit my big feet very well). So you lose the supposed benefit and still can't get out as easily and quickly as with clipless (once you get used to clipless). I think I fell 3-4 times initially with clipless before I "figured them out." But the advantages are HUGE and must be experienced. Oh, and a good set of mtn. clipless pedals (Wellgo--inexpensive Shimano clones are ok) and shoes could run less than $100 but you'll get more value than that every time you ride. Anyway, food for thought.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 10:55:29 AM EST
I ahven't got out into too much rough stuff (and have no current plans to go rock hopping) My Judy XC fork has been adequate. Maybe as I get into it more, the need for a high end fork will become more apparent. Clipless just scares me. Aside from marriage, I REALLY don't like being tied into anything.
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:04:30 AM EST
Oh, I should have looked at you photo first. I ASSumed you had toe clips. Platforms do give a nice comfortable feeling and are great for learing real technical skills like wheelies, track stands, etc. Now get off this board and go out and ride!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:18:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 11:26:56 AM EST by luger355]
Mountain bikers, its not to late. [b] Repent now while you still can!!! [/b] The paved path is true path to enlightment [0:)] [red]roadies rule[/red] [:D]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:25:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/12/2002 11:33:39 AM EST by ZOG]
How would you rate the standard Bontrager wheels and Judy XC fork that came stock on my bike??? I have no specific complaints - just looking to learn. -G-man Bontrager Asymetricals(offset spokes on rim) are great, and strong. Judy XC is adequate, I used one for a few years and it's now on my son's Specialized bike. I'm not sure what year your fork is, but I suspect you have a coil spring in each leg, most likely it is not ideal for your weight, the stock spring is usually not enough for someone of your stature. If you're not riding too hard on the single track you may be OK but consider putting in a set of after market heavy springs, (Speed Springs are about $50). I like the advice someone mentioned- Upgrade as you replace broken parts. But the best advice is to ride, ride, ride! Also, I should have mentioned as you replace broken parts don't hesitate to use "freeride" parts, these are usually more durable (but heavier) but at your weight, buy strong. One of my wheelsets is Veulta Freeride setup. rim width is 28mm vs. 23mm standard, they weigh 1 1/2 lbs. more than a standard XC setup but they are real solid when the going gets rough! The rule in mountain biking is: light, strong, or cheap . . . . . pick any two!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 11:42:20 AM EST
I forgot to mention to all the mountain bikers out there: CLP is the best chain lube I've ever used! It keeps my "rod" and my "ride" working smooth!
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 12:03:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By ZOG: I forgot to mention to all the mountain bikers out there: CLP is the best chain lube I've ever used! It keeps my "rod" and my "ride" working smooth!
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I use CLP on my chain too. Works great! I try to keep it off my rod though, can cause one hell of a rash. [:D]
Link Posted: 7/12/2002 12:23:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By FatMan: Best bike for the money: [img]http://www.radford.edu/~tczamansk/12.jpg[/img]
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Is that you on that trike? If so, you are NOT the "FatMan". [:D]
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