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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/19/2005 4:44:19 PM EDT
How many are using a motorcycle as their primary mode of transportation (including or excluding extreme weather)?

Been considering one as a secondary mode, but interested in opinions as a primary. Looking most likely at metric cruisers.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:37:41 PM EDT
I was a fulltimer in Memphis for a year and a half and in Houston for about a year.
Man the -degree weather is rough. The wind is the killer in the cold weather.
Combo of cold and rain is the worse. This was my exp while in TN.
I didn't really worry much about it when I was in Houston. Some rain, but always on the way home so no soggy cloths at work.
Personally I would buy a beater for the really bad weather days if I did it again.


Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:14:33 PM EDT
I ride the bike as much as I can, but not when it's threatening to rain or if it's below 30 (at least on the street, winter riding on the KX250 is fun)

If rain/cold is coming my way, I drive my Blazer.

I would think about motorcycle 100% of the time if I lived way down south or out west somewhere, but it's not possible around here.

WIZZO
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:07:31 PM EDT
Riding a bike in the rain and cold suck. I would never consider a bike as primary transportation.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:27:38 PM EDT
If I were going to go 100% bike, I would likely get a BMW GS adventure with the luggage. A goldwing with a sidecar or a trailer would be a second choice. A distant third would be a trike, but then the $$ is getting up there and they handle for shit. With the BMW's [650 and or 1200, or one of the older 11 or 1150 models] you can handle most any weather, do most of the maint yourself, and they are designed to take abuse and thrive. Ssmaller bikes [any dualsport 650] are good for zipping around, but not so good at hauling groceries. The bigger bikes cost more but can do more.

I wouldn't consider a cruiser style bike as more than a second vehicle. Big twins of any persuasion can be problematic to start in the winter. You also give up alot of handling with the feet forward riding position.

Check out Adventure Rider to see what hardcore 100% is all about. Remember the average city street is every bit as challenging as the alps....

Personally I do as much on my bike as possible. Evidence:
My bike pic page
Saavy listers will notice the RIFLE CASE that I have added, actually I can carry two now, enough to attend a 3 gun match on the bike, if I choose...

I could go on and on, Email me if you want more info...
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:38:01 PM EDT
When there isnt snow on the ground, its my first choice. If Im hauling passengers, going to be out past dark, hauling cargo, the truck gets the nod.


Link Posted: 9/19/2005 9:37:35 PM EDT
I bought one but I am only a fair weather rider. I hate rain, cold, and temps over 100 degrees.

I love to ride whenever I can but hate to ruin the experience by forcing myself into uncomfortable situations that's why I have the car as my bad weather vehicle.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 9:51:16 PM EDT
The wifez0r and I discussed it a number of times, as much as I wanted to get another bike, I didn't want to use it as primary transporation. If things looked good, then sure, I'd ride, but if it didn't, I wanted to be in the car (by the way, the car is a plain-boring-sedan...no excitement there). So I bought the bike (a VFR800FI Interceptor) and I ride it whenever I can...it's too fun! Sometimes there's a sad day and I drive, but now that Phoenix is getting into the nice weather...
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:53:31 AM EDT
I've kicked myself all summer for replacing the dead car with another car instead of a bike. Where I'm at right now I could do all the around-town errands for about 10 months out of the year (mid-dec through mid-feb would be dependant on snowfall).

I don't haul a lot of stuff, I don't haul people, I don't really do much except go to work and back because I can't justify using the gas it would take to go do anything else on a regular basis.

Oh well, such is life. I AM eyeballing the diesel version of the KLR thats supposed to be out in March '06, it'd be about perfect for year-round riding here, since I'm thinking a dual-sport bike can probably handle a little bit of snow. At the very least, it'd cut down on the number of non-bike days.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 10:03:33 PM EDT
Riding a Kawasaki 800 Classic everyday there is no threat of storms and when it doesn't get below 50. I work second shift and you feel the cold temps more at night in my opinion. I travel 45 minutes one way to work. My co-worker travels another 30 min beyond that on his Kawasaki 800.

Cruisers Rock!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:38:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JTChance:
Riding a Kawasaki 800 Classic everyday there is no threat of storms and when it doesn't get below 50. I work second shift and you feel the cold temps more at night in my opinion. I travel 45 minutes one way to work. My co-worker travels another 30 min beyond that on his Kawasaki 800.

Cruisers Rock!



This is more or less what I had in mind. I like cruisers because I'm not really comfortable with the forward position of "sport" bikes or the "upright" position of duals.
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 10:21:29 PM EDT
I'm covered for insurance on the bike year round. I ride till it snows or till it gets dangerously cold, which starts for me I think when it gets below 30 Farenheit, if I remember right. I basically ride as long as I can. I've got saddle bags, so I can make a beer run, a bookstore run, and even a food run with the bike. I'm not a rain rider by choice, mainly because of the inconvenience of wet clothes. My other vehicle is a '95 F150.

GL

bike pic 1
bike pic 2

Link Posted: 9/26/2005 12:00:32 PM EDT
As long as you have a car or truck available as backup, I'd say go for it. Year-round riding weather is nice too.

In daily driver mode:

Link Posted: 9/26/2005 12:11:02 PM EDT
I used to ride all the time. In fact, my motorcycle was my only means of transportation. But, things changed about 10 years ago. Drivers just didn't see me. I've even started wearing a bright orange and yellow traffic vest, but it didn't help much. I've been cut off, tailgated and almost run over while waiting for a train at a crossing with arms! After several of the guys in my racing club (track road racing) got killed or mangled, I quit riding on the road. Over the past few years most of the motorcycle fatalities in my area were not the fault of the rider, but usually some driver. One guy ran over a rider while he was talking on his cell phone and leaving a voicemail was recorded to say "oops, knocked a motorcycle over....do I have to stop?"
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 8:41:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By last_mile2002:
I used to ride all the time. In fact, my motorcycle was my only means of transportation. But, things changed about 10 years ago. Drivers just didn't see me. I've even started wearing a bright orange and yellow traffic vest, but it didn't help much. I've been cut off, tailgated and almost run over while waiting for a train at a crossing with arms! After several of the guys in my racing club (track road racing) got killed or mangled, I quit riding on the road. Over the past few years most of the motorcycle fatalities in my area were not the fault of the rider, but usually some driver. One guy ran over a rider while he was talking on his cell phone and leaving a voicemail was recorded to say "oops, knocked a motorcycle over....do I have to stop?"



I know exactly what you mean. Nearly getting killed by stupid drivers is basically a daily occurance to motorcyclists.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:38:01 PM EDT
I got my first street bike at age 15 and didn't get my first car until age 20. Living in Florida does give you decent temps most of the year (but it does get cold and rains almost every day). The bike only lifestyle in my younger years made regular dating a tough thing. It's great for a "hit and run" love life though.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 6:57:52 PM EDT
I commute every day on a street oriented KLR 650. Street tires, oversize front rotor, steel-braided brake line, progressive springs, fork brace, etc... to make the KLR more street friendly. Gas and parking issues are a thing of the past. Here in Hawaii, the weather really isn't a factor. Sometimes I find myself wishing it would rain while I'm riding just to cool me off.
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