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Posted: 5/9/2004 6:27:16 AM EST
The original Mother's Day Proclamation was made in 1870. Written by Julia Ward Howe, perhaps best known today for having written the words to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic".
Here are the words to the original Mother's Day Proclamation:

Arise, then, women of this day! Arise all women who have hearts,
whether our baptism be that of water or of fears!

Say firmly: "We will not have great questions decided by
irrelevant agencies. Our husbands shall not come to us, reeking
with carnage, for caresses and applause. Our sons shall not be
taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach
them of charity, mercy and patience.

We women of one country will be too tender of those of another
country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs. From
the bosom of the devastated earth a voice goes up with our own.
It says "Disarm, Disarm! The sword of murder is not the balance
of justice."

Blood does not wipe our dishonor nor violence indicate possession.
As men have often forsaken the plow and the anvil at the summons
of war, let women now leave all that may be left of home for a
great and earnest day of counsel. Let them meet first, as women,
to bewail and commemorate the dead.

Let them then solemnly take counsel with each other as to the
means whereby the great human family can live in peace, each
bearing after their own time the sacred impress, not of Caesar,
but of God.

In the name of womanhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a
general congress of women without limit of nationality may be
appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient and at
the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the
alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement
of international questions, the great and general interests of
peace.


Julia Ward Howe
Boston
1870

Committed to abolishing war, Howe wrote: "Our husbands shall not come to us reeking with carnage... Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience. We women of one country will be too tender of those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs".

A schoolteacher named Anna M. Jarvis (1864 - 1948) is credited with gaining recognition for our modern celebration of Mother's Day. She created the holiday to honor her departed mother, Anna Reese Jarvis of Grafton, W. Va. The younger Jarvis remembered her mother's comments that men were always being honored, but not women or mothers, and that the scars of the Civil War could be healed if mothers were treated with more respect.

In 1913, Congress declared the second Sunday in May to be Mother's Day. Since then, Mother's Day has ballooned into a billion-dollar industry.

Call your mother, kids.
Link Posted: 5/9/2004 8:51:43 AM EST
I've got 3 mothers. The first one, my birth mom died from cancer 9 days after I was born. I was adopted and didn't know it for 41 years so there's my adopted mom that had a stroke 3 years ago and I've been taking care of her at home ever since and then there's my step mom(my birth father got remairred a year or so after my birth mom died) and I sent her a card and called her today. I'm just glad that I found out I was adopted and found my birth family, I really love those guys. It's nice to have brothers and sisters after being raised an only child for most of my life. Anyway, talk to ya'll later and have a happy mothers day.
Link Posted: 5/9/2004 1:26:09 PM EST
My home town is Grafton, West Virginia.

Even if I have lived around in more places than my home town, I still remember the Mothers Day Shrine services with my grandmother.

The Elementary school is named after Anna Jarvis as well as a few other places around town, her home is part of the historic trail and in sad need of repair.

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