Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 10/4/2005 10:06:29 AM EDT
Do you think of police officer as a dangerous job? How about a firefighter or military career?

link

America's most dangerous jobs
Survey: Loggers and fisherman still take the most risk; roofers record sharp increase in fatalities.
September 23, 2005: 2:08 PM EDT
By Les Christie, CNN/Money staff writer


NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - There's a memorial in Gloucester, Massachusetts that stands at the city's harbor edge. It's a fisherman leaning into the wind and peering out to the open sea as if searching for a safe route home -- or perhaps a lost companion.

A semicircle of bronze tablets containing the names of more than 10,000 Gloucestermen lost in fishing accidents over the years lies at his feet, a monument to one of America's most dangerous occupations.

In some occupations, danger comes with job. That's seen in the latest national census of fatal occupational injuries from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, released Friday.

The good news is that 2004 was one of the safest years on record -- only 5,703 fatal injuries occurred on the job. Still, that was up slightly from the year before when 5,575 died, and there were categories of fatal injuries that had risen more substantially.

Hispanic workers, for example, died at a rate 11 percent higher than 2004. Older worker deaths were up 10 percent.

Fatal injuries from being struck by objects jumped 12 percent...that is now the third most common fatal event, surpassing homicide on the job, which dropped 9 percent to 551. That continued a steep decline from a peak of 1,080 on-the-job murders in 1994.

Highway accidents on the job were the No. 1 killer -- 1,374 died last year, 21 more than the year before.

By occupation
Nearly half of all fatal work injuries occurred among workers who drive or move material around for a living. Truck drivers, forklift operators, trash collectors, and cabbies are all part of this group.

Construction workers had 9 percent more fatalities. Of these, roofers recorded 94 deaths, a sharp increase from the 55 they incurred the year before.

The highest rates of fatal injuries -- the most per worker employed -- occurred among loggers, pilots, and fishermen.

Loggers recorded 85 fatalities in 2004, a rate of 92.4 deaths for every 100,000 workers, more than 22 times the rate among all workers. Loggers deal with tremendous weights when they fell trees and it's not always possible to know exactly where a tree will fall or when. Too, they often work on steep hillsides, in poor weather, and in a hurry.

Aircraft pilots matched that death rate of 92.4 and 109 of them died on the job. Many of these were in the general aviation category, small aircraft manned by bush pilots, air-taxi pilots, and crop-dusters. Their equipment can be old and the maintenance less stringent than among the big airlines, adding to the danger.

The fishing industry is a perennial leader as measured by death rate and 2004 was no different; 38 fishermen died, a rate of 86.4 per 100,000. Drowning is the most common cause of death in this industry, but fishermen also suffer from fatal accidents in handling some of the heavy equipment that the modern fisheries employ.

The 10 most dangerous jobs by fatality rate are:

Rank Occupation Death rate/100,000 Total deaths
1 Logging workers 92.4 85
2 Aircraft pilots 92.4 109
3 Fishers and fishing workers 86.4 38
4 Structural iron and steel workers 47.0 31
5 Refuse and recyclable material collectors 43.2 35
6 Farmers and ranchers 37.5 307
7 Roofers 34.9 94
8 Electrical power line installers/repairers 30.0 36
9 Driver/sales workers and truck drivers 27.6 905
10 Taxi drivers and chauffeurs 24.2 67
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:11:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 10:20:22 AM EDT by CFII]
Great. Pilots





I think I see why now. We rarely get "injured". We either walk away, or become a puddle of mush on the ground.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:12:16 AM EDT
Hey I've done 3 of those jobs and 2 of sent me to the emergency room. I wonder if Sigfried is looking for a replacement for Roy?hmmm
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:12:20 AM EDT
Libertard made list.

Max
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:12:41 AM EDT
That simply cannot be!

We have it on good authority otherwise!

Well, OK, I suppose we have to buy those numbers....

Watch out for the increased 'militarization' of lumberjacks!

Eric The(PaulBunyonWouldBePizzed)Hun
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:12:57 AM EDT
They lie. Law enforcement is THE most dangerous, thats why they consistently are militarizing themselves, to keep us and them safe....right?
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:14:08 AM EDT
What about "Crack Whore" Or the dreaded "Assistant Crack Whore" professions?

I miss Norm!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:14:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:19:05 AM EDT
I thought it was strange that it was by CNN and they didn't have military at the top of the list. I guess this should send a message to the scarred soccer moms that would have you think that staying near home and farming or recycling will keep their kids safer than joining the military.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:19:13 AM EDT
Pilots surprised me.

Re: the LEO comments: I think you're going to get the argument that death rates are one thing and murder rates are another. From the list above, it would appear that getting into a motor vehicle accident is by far the most dangerous part of an LEOs job (ie. likelihood of injury or death). Spending a lot of time on the road is evidently not healthy for you.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:21:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KnobCreek:
Pilots surprised me.

Re: the LEO comments: I think you're going to get the argument that death rates are one thing and murder rates are another. From the list above, it would appear that getting into a motor vehicle accident is by far the most dangerous part of an LEOs job (ie. likelihood of injury or death). Spending a lot of time on the road is evidently not healthy for you.



Yeah but it is suppossed to be dangerous jobs. By that logic they would have to believe that murder isn't dangerous!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:22:46 AM EDT
Statistically speaking, President of the United States is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:25:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:26:28 AM EDT
Interesting...

Pretty accurate but they left out the military jobs.

IIRC, Navy carrier flight deck crew is the most dangerous of all military jobs...and I suspect closely followed by trigger pullers and EOD.

I could be wrong though...
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:27:32 AM EDT
where's "Company Computer Guy" and/or "Driving Range Golf Ball Picker Upper Guy"??
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:27:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:
They lie. Law enforcement is THE most dangerous, thats why they consistently are militarizing themselves, to keep us and them safe....right?



Some people.....

Look. Being a cop is dangerous. If you think it is a cakewalk, go become a cop.

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:27:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 10:28:18 AM EDT by SmilingBandit]
These guys didn't make the cut either?

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:29:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
Statistically speaking, President of the United States is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.



That's what I thought of too. 4 out of 43 have been assassinated. I don't recall how many attemped assassinations there have been, but it's a least another 4 or 5.

Astronauts used to rank pretty high too.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:33:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KnobCreek:

Re: the LEO comments: I think you're going to get the argument that death rates are one thing and murder rates are another. From the list above, it would appear that getting into a motor vehicle accident is by far the most dangerous part of an LEOs job (ie. likelihood of injury or death). Spending a lot of time on the road is evidently not healthy for you.



No, they included on-the-job murder too.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:33:48 AM EDT


I figured "arfcom moderator" would make the list.


Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:34:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
....go become a cop.



...and get paid less than I do now to be shot at, spit on, hit, hated, etc???

That would be stupid.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:35:10 AM EDT
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:38:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:40:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?

+1 DF.....great attention to detail there on your part.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:40:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By California_Kid:
Statistically speaking, President of the United States is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.



By their standard, it is the most dangerous. Four Pesidents assassinated out of 43 translates to a death rate of 9,302/100,000.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:51:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LWilde:
Interesting...

Pretty accurate but they left out the military jobs.

IIRC, Navy carrier flight deck crew is the most dangerous of all military jobs...and I suspect closely followed by trigger pullers and EOD.

I could be wrong though...



The study included military Accidental deaths. The militray accidental death rate in 2004 was 5.2 per 100,000. They did not include combat deaths. Including combat deaths, the military has the highest fatality rate. In 2004, there were 1887 total military deaths out of 1,711,916 "workers." That is a fatality rate of 110.2 per 100,000.

Considering people are ACTIVELY trying to kill them on a daily basis, it is not that much more dangerous than being a logger, aircraft pilot, or fisherman.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:55:39 AM EDT
I recently quit my very well paying cushy deskjob (IT) to be a lineman for the electric company. I've had more close calls of dying in the last 2 months than through my 12 years in the Marine Corps. It's great to be working in the outdoors! Little paycut but well worth it.

Cops, meh, El Paso has had 2 cops die in the line of duty in the last 13 years and one of them was a car accident , more dangerous being a security guard, pizza deliverer, or graveyard shift stop & rob clerk around here. But every cop friend I have thinks they got the most dangerous job, sure buddy, come help me fix a hi-volt line 150 feet high during a lightning storm and talk to me about dangerous, my dept has lost 2 guys this year and it aint a huge department.

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:56:12 AM EDT
Boys, Boys....stop your bickering. You're ALL pretty!

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:57:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By daisywench:
Boys, Boys....stop your bickering. You're ALL pretty!


hell....i KNOW i'm pretty.....what i'm trying to prove here is that i'm a badass
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:00:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 11:04:40 AM EDT by PAEBR332]

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?



There is a very strong positive correlation between fatalities and non-fatal injuries. This was first found in 1931 and is now known as Heinrich's Pyramid Theory. For every fatality there is a certain ratio of major injuries, minor injuries, property damage losses, and near misses. This theory was validated by an insurance industry study in the late 60's that looked at over 1.7 million on-the-job incidents in nearly 300 companies and 21 different types of industries.

Without even seeing the accident figures, I would predict with high confidence (statistically speaking) that these same industries would also rank quite high in non-fatal injury rates.

ETA: In the Western world, the ratio, found in multiple studies, is about 1,000 lost time injuries for every fatality.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:07:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?



There is a very strong positive correlation between fatalities and non-fatal injuries. This was first found in 1931 and is now known as Heinrich's Pyramid Theory. For every fatality there is a certain ratio of major injuries, minor injuries, property damage losses, and near misses. This theory was validated by an insurance industry study in the late 60's that looked at over 1.7 million on-the-job incidents in nearly 300 companies and 21 different types of industries.

Without even seeing the accident figures, I would predict with high confidence (statistically speaking) that these same industries would also rank quite high in non-fatal injury rates.

ETA: In the Western world, the ratio, found in multiple studies, is about 1,000 lost time injuries for every fatality.

a couple of the jobs listed, i'd have to agree like maybe the fishermen (but on a diff. note..i'm SURE the crab fishermen in Alaska are lumped into this group)or maybe the farmers...but electrical line installers, aircraft pilots? come on man....when these guys fuck up....they die....
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:08:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CeramicGod:
They lie. Law enforcement is THE most dangerous, thats why they consistently are militarizing themselves, to keep us and them safe....right?

This is about death, not bumps and bruises.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:09:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
a couple of the jobs listed, i'd have to agree like maybe the fishermen (but on a diff. note..i'm SURE the crab fishermen in Alaska are lumped into this group)or maybe the farmers...but electrical line installers, aircraft pilots? come on man....when these guys fuck up....they die....



Less than 20% of aircraft accidents result in fatalities.

Ref
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:09:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:10:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?



There is a very strong positive correlation between fatalities and non-fatal injuries. This was first found in 1931 and is now known as Heinrich's Pyramid Theory. For every fatality there is a certain ratio of major injuries, minor injuries, property damage losses, and near misses. This theory was validated by an insurance industry study in the late 60's that looked at over 1.7 million on-the-job incidents in nearly 300 companies and 21 different types of industries.

Without even seeing the accident figures, I would predict with high confidence (statistically speaking) that these same industries would also rank quite high in non-fatal injury rates.

ETA: In the Western world, the ratio, found in multiple studies, is about 1,000 lost time injuries for every fatality.

a couple of the jobs listed, i'd have to agree like maybe the fishermen (but on a diff. note..i'm SURE the crab fishermen in Alaska are lumped into this group)or maybe the farmers...but electrical line installers, aircraft pilots? come on man....when these guys fuck up....they die....



My dad was an lineman for over 30 years. He knew of only one fatality in his company during that time. He personally knew of dozens of guys who got hurt. Pilots get hurt FAR more frequently in trip and fall accidents, struck by objects during the walk-around, etc. then they die in fatal accidents.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:10:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CFII:
Great. Pilots





I think I see why now. We rarely get "injured". We either walk away, or become a puddle of mush on the ground.



Thats why its always Pilot Error.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:11:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SHIVAN:

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
....go become a cop.



...and get paid less than I do now to be shot at, spit on, hit, hated, etc???

That would be stupid.



Exactly. Similarly, I'm not going to quit managing a department at an engineering frim to become a garbage man.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:12:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
a couple of the jobs listed, i'd have to agree like maybe the fishermen (but on a diff. note..i'm SURE the crab fishermen in Alaska are lumped into this group)or maybe the farmers...but electrical line installers, aircraft pilots? come on man....when these guys fuck up....they die....



Less than 20% of aircraft accidents result in fatalities.

Ref

inconclusive at best

*Accidents and fatalities in the categories do not necessarily sum to the figures in U.S. civil aviation because of collisions involving aircraft in different categories.*

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:13:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?



There is a very strong positive correlation between fatalities and non-fatal injuries. This was first found in 1931 and is now known as Heinrich's Pyramid Theory. For every fatality there is a certain ratio of major injuries, minor injuries, property damage losses, and near misses. This theory was validated by an insurance industry study in the late 60's that looked at over 1.7 million on-the-job incidents in nearly 300 companies and 21 different types of industries.

Without even seeing the accident figures, I would predict with high confidence (statistically speaking) that these same industries would also rank quite high in non-fatal injury rates.

ETA: In the Western world, the ratio, found in multiple studies, is about 1,000 lost time injuries for every fatality.

Does that ratio remain consistant across industries?



Pretty darn close. In the huge 1969 study they looked at 21 different industries, and got statistically identical rates across the board. I haven't followed the studies since I was a safety manager in the late 90's, but back then it was still accurate across occupations.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:17:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:
this isnt going to turn into a LEO chest beating "i'm a hardass JBT slayer" thread is it? cause if thats the case, then lemme throw my job out there for you. travel worldwide about 8 months of the year, into areas like Iraq, etc. unarmed...so factor in, warzone, air travel into those area, etc.....i'd say my job is pretty dangerous too....

I'm still waiting for the majority to notice that the title says "Most dangerous", but the article talks about "deadliest".
Injuries not resulting in death isn't dangerous?



There is a very strong positive correlation between fatalities and non-fatal injuries. This was first found in 1931 and is now known as Heinrich's Pyramid Theory. For every fatality there is a certain ratio of major injuries, minor injuries, property damage losses, and near misses. This theory was validated by an insurance industry study in the late 60's that looked at over 1.7 million on-the-job incidents in nearly 300 companies and 21 different types of industries.

Without even seeing the accident figures, I would predict with high confidence (statistically speaking) that these same industries would also rank quite high in non-fatal injury rates.

ETA: In the Western world, the ratio, found in multiple studies, is about 1,000 lost time injuries for every fatality.

a couple of the jobs listed, i'd have to agree like maybe the fishermen (but on a diff. note..i'm SURE the crab fishermen in Alaska are lumped into this group)or maybe the farmers...but electrical line installers, aircraft pilots? come on man....when these guys fuck up....they die....



My dad was an lineman for over 30 years. He knew of only one fatality in his company during that time. He personally knew of dozens of guys who got hurt. Pilots get hurt FAR more frequently in trip and fall accidents, struck by objects during the walk-around, etc. then they die in fatal accidents.

i'm sure everyone here is going to "know a guy" that has "been there" or "done that" that will say theyve only seen this or that....but statistically...again..back to statistics...thats ONE PERSON on ONE jobsite or in one area.....hell...we could argue that all day long...shit...i know a guy who was building a barn and it collapsed on him...on the flip side take Steve Erwin....the odds are definately stacked against him, but hes still alive.....so again.....there are alot of varibles and factors to consider.... [shrug]
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:17:46 AM EDT
Other than military, how many of those professions are killed/attacked/injured for DOING their job? Not many. OK, the crab fisherman may get attacked by that recidivist crab that refuses to go back to the hold alive......

Brian
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:22:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

<snip>

i'm sure everyone here is going to "know a guy" that has "been there" or "done that" that will say theyve only seen this or that....but statistically...again..back to statistics...thats ONE PERSON on ONE jobsite or in one area.....hell...we could argue that all day long...shit...i know a guy who was building a barn and it collapsed on him...on the flip side take Steve Erwin....the odds are definately stacked against him, but hes still alive.....so again.....there are alot of varibles and factors to consider.... [shrug]



Statistically speaking, the Heinrich Pyramid has been validated in multiple studies. And since my current job involves using and teaching applied statistics, I am very confident I can make that statement with a high probability of being correct. As always, YMMV.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:26:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By afman91201:
I thought it was strange that it was by CNN and they didn't have military at the top of the list. I guess this should send a message to the scarred soccer moms that would have you think that staying near home and farming or recycling will keep their kids safer than joining the military.



Nothing strange about that at all. It is, after all, CNN.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:30:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

<snip>

i'm sure everyone here is going to "know a guy" that has "been there" or "done that" that will say theyve only seen this or that....but statistically...again..back to statistics...thats ONE PERSON on ONE jobsite or in one area.....hell...we could argue that all day long...shit...i know a guy who was building a barn and it collapsed on him...on the flip side take Steve Erwin....the odds are definately stacked against him, but hes still alive.....so again.....there are alot of varibles and factors to consider.... [shrug]



Statistically speaking, the Heinrich Pyramid has been validated in multiple studies. And since my current job involves using and teaching applied statistics, I am very confident I can make that statement with a high probability of being correct. As always, YMMV.

YMMV? I'm also not sure why you keep quoting the Heinrich Pyramid....when did we start focusing solely on air traffic accidents in this discussion? I'm not sure what point youre trying to prove...youve lost me.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:36:42 AM EDT
First of all the title says America's most dangerous jobs, not most dangerous jobs held by americans.

Most of your military deaths occur somewhere other than America. As for police I don't know the numbers so I can't say. Secondly the stats appear to be compiled for the year 2004. We only had one president in 2004 and he didn't die so thats a rate of 0 deaths per 100,000. Sorry I am somewhat of a reading comprehension nazi. I work in the timber industry, thankully not a logger, some of hose boys get pretty messed up. If I were to leave I would join the mining industry, which suprising isn't on the list, we have had quite a few miners killed in southern WV this year.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:37:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:

Originally Posted By StykUrHedUp:

<snip>

i'm sure everyone here is going to "know a guy" that has "been there" or "done that" that will say theyve only seen this or that....but statistically...again..back to statistics...thats ONE PERSON on ONE jobsite or in one area.....hell...we could argue that all day long...shit...i know a guy who was building a barn and it collapsed on him...on the flip side take Steve Erwin....the odds are definately stacked against him, but hes still alive.....so again.....there are alot of varibles and factors to consider.... [shrug]



Statistically speaking, the Heinrich Pyramid has been validated in multiple studies. And since my current job involves using and teaching applied statistics, I am very confident I can make that statement with a high probability of being correct. As always, YMMV.

YMMV? I'm also not sure why you keep quoting the Heinrich Pyramid....when did we start focusing solely on air traffic accidents in this discussion? I'm not sure what point youre trying to prove...youve lost me.



The Heinrich pyramid states that for every fatality, there will be so many major injuries, minor injuries, property damage injuries, and near misses. If you are given any of those incident rates, you can calculate what the other rates will be with very high statistical confidence.

Since the study report dangerous jobs classified by FATALITIES, one can expect, again with high statistical confidence, that these same industries will have a similar ranking in regards to non-fatal injuries.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:38:08 AM EDT
Better be carefull. All the thin-skinned LEOs on this board is going to get upset, accuse you of cop bashing.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:57:34 AM EDT
This only gets posted here what, every couple of months?
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:11:11 PM EDT
Last I heard King Crab fishermen were #1 on the most dangerous list.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 12:13:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ctprelude:
Last I heard King Crab fishermen were #1 on the most dangerous list.

Honestly even though the Alaska dept of Game and fish runs the season, they run it by allowing what can come into their ports. They are not in US territorial waters. Lots of times they are closer to Russia than they are the US.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 1:00:20 PM EDT
Tannerite packer did'nt make the list?
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top