Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 11/3/2009 12:04:47 PM EST
I'm looking for feedback on knowledge and/or experience with them. Who's got it?

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:05:28 PM EST
i turned out just fine
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:05:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:06:11 PM EST
my brother has had both of his children in them and is very happy with their approach and curriculum.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:06:42 PM EST
Isn't this where the Tards go?


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:07:20 PM EST
My 4 year old daughter is in one. We are extremely happy with the school she is in. They do a great job with the kids and we're amazed at all of the stuff she's learning in there.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:09:34 PM EST
I was in a montessori school for kindergarden through 8th grade. It is a very different approach, but it got me into the private high school of my choice. It was weak on the math and sciences and heavy on the lets hold hands and solve the worlds problems. I still came out with a strong desire to own and shoot guns. Just raise your kids right and that should counteract the liberal bullshit that the schools press.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:09:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Isn't this where the Tards go?



Tards go to public schools
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:10:52 PM EST
Originally Posted By Tekka:

Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Isn't this where the Tards go?



Tards go to public schools
uh-huh.

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:16:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 12:19:37 PM EST by AmericanPatriot]
Everyone gets a trophy, yeah.


My sister is a flaming Lib, her oldest went to a Waldorf Education camp....err school, I think they are similar.

Any how, it has GAY written all over it.

That's my harsh and simplistic opinion, judge the video presentation for yourself :

http://www.tidewaterschool.org/ (no hotlink please)



ETA : a primer .... http://www.michaelolaf.net/MONTESSORI%20and%20WALDORF.html
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:16:47 PM EST
Very expensive when we had our child enrolled in Cheyenne, and I really couldn't honestly tell you that he had excelled over his non-Montessori peers.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:23:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 12:24:23 PM EST by Vaux]
Originally Posted By opti12206:
I was in a montessori school for kindergarden through 8th grade. It is a very different approach, but it got me into the private high school of my choice. It was weak on the math and sciences and heavy on the lets hold hands and solve the worlds problems. I still came out with a strong desire to own and shoot guns. Just raise your kids right and that should counteract the liberal bullshit that the schools press.


My son was Pre-K'er in a Montessori school and I got the same impression. Obviously, he wasn't taking math and science in Pre-K but, after talking to the teachers and other parents, it just seemed a little "liberal" to me. So, starting in Kindergarten, we sent him to a very good Catholic school in our area. He's in third grade now, loves his school, and does very well. My wife and I are happy with our decision.

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:25:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 12:25:41 PM EST by FatCat1]
Originally Posted By WhirlyGirl45:
Originally Posted By Tekka:

Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Isn't this where the Tards go?



Tards go to public schools
uh-huh.



Damn that's why my parents put me in public school.


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:27:55 PM EST
I can attest to this a bit as I've known several people, and I'm sure I'll get blasted, but this is just my experience...

If you want your kids to be super smart and excel in academics but suck at making friends... send them.
If you want your kids to have decent social skills, and decent academics... send them to normal school.
If you want a decent balance, send them to montessori through like 3rd or 4th grade, then get them the crap out of there so they can learn to play with other kids.

Out of the people I have known that went to those, none have been totally normal.
One chick is super duper hot, OK but not great social skills, she's super smart, but she sits at home and reads all day, she's 25 years old, has no job, has no desire to get a driver's license, and she has a kid.
Others I've known are just odd, they don't know how to interact with people on a social level. Some kids were just spacey and wanted to sit and do their own thing not understanding how to play with the other children, and another guy I knew looked at me one day and said, "I wish I had a chance to be young again and make friends." He was like 20.

Some parents of a girl they were considering sending I brought up the social problem and they said, "Oh, don't worry, we know... 4th or 5th grade and we'll put them in a real school. We've seen the social issues."

Flame away

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:50:52 PM EST
Both my children went to a montessori school from age 2 1/2 through kindergarden.

Both now go to public school and are doing very well.

Maria Montessori focused on early childhood development. I think this is where there is the biggest difference (advantage).
I like the mixed ages and the hands on part of it.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:53:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 12:53:26 PM EST by TechGal26]

Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Originally Posted By WhirlyGirl45:
Originally Posted By Tekka:

Originally Posted By FatCat1:
Isn't this where the Tards go?



Tards go to public schools
uh-huh.



Damn that's why my parents put me in public school.


They did right by you.

I have only heard great things about Montessori schools.
(In Prescott some pedo was going to schools as a 12 y/o(don't ask me how he managed to do that ) but he got caught when he tried at a Montessori. There was like 8 other schools he did this at.)
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:54:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By REALM:
I can attest to this a bit as I've known several people, and I'm sure I'll get blasted, but this is just my experience...

If you want your kids to be super smart and excel in academics but suck at making friends... send them.
If you want your kids to have decent social skills, and decent academics... send them to normal school.
If you want a decent balance, send them to montessori through like 3rd or 4th grade, then get them the crap out of there so they can learn to play with other kids.

Out of the people I have known that went to those, none have been totally normal.
One chick is super duper hot, OK but not great social skills, she's super smart, but she sits at home and reads all day, she's 25 years old, has no job, has no desire to get a driver's license, and she has a kid.
Others I've known are just odd, they don't know how to interact with people on a social level. Some kids were just spacey and wanted to sit and do their own thing not understanding how to play with the other children, and another guy I knew looked at me one day and said, "I wish I had a chance to be young again and make friends." He was like 20.

Some parents of a girl they were considering sending I brought up the social problem and they said, "Oh, don't worry, we know... 4th or 5th grade and we'll put them in a real school. We've seen the social issues."

Flame away


If you want a girl to become a foul badly behaved whore. You send them to public school to learn to be a petty cruel bitch who thinks getting sexually harassed and treated like a piece of meat is normal.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:55:43 PM EST
I think there is research out there that at either at high school graduation or college graduation there was statistically no difference in how Montessori kids turned out.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 12:57:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By Harvster:
I think there is research out there that at either at high school graduation or college graduation there was statistically no difference in how Montessori kids turned out.

That's because HS and college is mostly a joke.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:00:03 PM EST
I went there for pre-school and frankly found them a little lacking. They were innovative, supportive, nurturing . . . I discovered upon entering elementary school that they in no way prepared me properly for nuns. Nuns for 8 years. I mean really . . . they should have started me on a strict program of kneeling on rows of pencils, getting the backs of my knuckles whacked with one of those solid three sided wood rulers, holding folding chairs above my head, repetitive blackboard writing . . .

E-95
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:06:52 PM EST
I'm a product of the system, and there is only one problem that I encountered. My parents sent me Pre-K. I loved it and was reading on a 3rd grade level and doing simple division and multiplication by the time I left. The problem I had was when I went into gradeschool at a seperate private academy, the program only went through K, I was way ahead of those in my 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade classes. I then got bored and became somewhat of a pain in the ass according to my teachers. I was that smart fucker that always blurts out answers, who everyone wants to beat the shit out of. After a few bouts on the playground I straightened out. As far as sending your children all the way Pre-8-12 I would not, as the community is really tight and full of libs. I however am going to send my daughter Pre-K and then transfer her into the local Christian school that streamlines one of their classes for the advanced kids coming out of the program. I loved it and learned alot of cool stuff. also had my first girlfriend, and beat a kid up who refused to come back to school, for making fun of a deaf girl. YMMV, but I will not hesitate to send my daughter.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:09:41 PM EST
My wife is a certified Montessori teacher. She works in a public school that is branded as Montessori. Its a branding... nothing more. They have all of the materials, furniture etc. But, because of No Child Left Behind and SOL's they do not get to use them. Montessori and SOL's are in my opinion diametrically opposite teaching methods. Montessori is typically letting the child learn at their own pace with a teacher guiding them. In a standard school setting it is required the child learn a specific set of information as laid out by the teacher following the SOL guidelines. I have seen my wife go through the whole process of getting certified to teach Montessori, and then come to the realization that because she has to make absolutely sure that the kids pass the SOL's she cannot teach in a Montessori style. It has been a painful process.

I honestly think that I would have done better in a Montessori school had I been given a chance. Looking at the materials they use, I would have understood them a lot better than then worksheets and crap my teachers put me through.

I also know a few kids that are attending private Montessori schools. I see nothing wrong with them. I do note that their parents are a heck of a lot more involved in their kids education than the public school parents. I do think that is the key for a lot of kids. The parents at my wifes school see it as a place to drop off the kids while they go to work. That is if they work.

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:17:31 PM EST
I'm in education and from all I have read the closer a regular public school is to the montessori type of concept the better the kids do on the state tests (whatever that is worth ).
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:23:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 1:24:46 PM EST by Mazeman]

Originally Posted By ARLady:
I'm looking for feedback on knowledge and/or experience with them. Who's got it?

My daughter went to one for two pre-school years, and kindergarten.

We were extremely pleased. This school was surprisingly well structured, and they kept the kids focused and disciplined. I had thought Montessori's were free-fo-alls where kids did whatever they wanted, but that wasn't the case for this one.

I only wish ours continued for higher grades..

Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:25:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 1:27:13 PM EST by m4sarecool]
I was doing stuff there that most didn't until 2nd or 3rd grade. It is a nice jump start, but things average off before middle school.

ETA: I was there for I think 2 years then went into 1st grade at a private school.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 2:12:06 PM EST
Thanks for the replies. I'm in the process of digesting the info I'm finding, but it's one thing to read some flowery language on a website site. Particularly if the experience of those who've had children in them or attended as children themselves doesn't quite match up.

We're considering the option for my pre-k son. He will not attend kindergarten there as there is a school closer to our home that I will enroll him. Would enroll him there for pre-K if they offered it.


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 2:21:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 2:22:42 PM EST by Pred]
My mother taught in that system for years, and I was there through the 3rd grade. Here's the thing, you can't really go to Montessori for just a "few" years, you really need to go all the way through in the system. I can remember kids leaving Montessori after the 6th grade, only to spend the 7th and 8th grade doing jack because they already knew it. After 2 years the entire time they spent in the system was wasted because public schools lag way behind.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 2:33:49 PM EST
My kids went there, very happy with the experience and the teachers. They do learn social skills at Montessori and a love for learning. Can't think of a better place, other than home, for kids in their formative years. For us it was a valuable place and helped my kids excel later in life. YMMV.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 3:16:15 PM EST
It really depends on your children. I have four kids and all went through the Montessori schools for two years. My 1st & 3rd born are highly motivated, self starters and they excelled in the program. The other's aren't as motivated and the work at your own pace didn't suit them well, so we transitioned them to another private school. So - it depends....

Try it out for a year and see how your child adapts.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 4:55:34 PM EST
I went at age 4-5. Those two years did more for me than the next 6 years of elementary school. But I also went there over 40 years ago, and our school was run by a European woman who had studied under Maria Montessori.
Top Top