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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 7/20/2008 11:03:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 11:03:41 PM EST by 22bad]
Modern day Iron Skillets, just as good as the ones from twenty-thirty years ago?

As far as the iron that passes to the food?

Do I need to get an old used one?

or, will a new one work fine?
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:05:54 PM EST
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:08:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:10:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Well my wife went to the doctor last week, and they said her iron level were good. Does that help?
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:10:59 PM EST
They seem to be about the same.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:12:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Jrock82:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Well my wife went to the doctor last week, and they said her iron level were good. Does that help?


It doesn't hurt, was she told her iron was low before you got the skillet?
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:14:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By Windustsearch:
They seem to be about the same.


I hope so, I want to get a couple of bigger ones
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:15:24 PM EST
i prefer the vintage stuff, it is hard to beat 50 years of use

any local flea market or yard sale should have one

besides who wants more stuff made in china in their house
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:22:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Well my wife went to the doctor last week, and they said her iron level were good. Does that help?


It doesn't hurt, was she told her iron was low before you got the skillet?


Not sure, her being a woman though I know they need more than men.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 11:25:26 PM EST
i have used old shit (althought i am not sure how old) and newer shit and it seems about the same.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:04:56 AM EST
Hell, I thought you were referring to the truck stops!
HArd to beat a 15oz Tbone and fixin's for 9.99!

i'VE BEEN COOKING WITH THESAME SKILETS FOR A long TIME,AND THEY'RE HAND ME DOWNS MOSTLY.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:12:42 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 12:52:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Lodge cast iron is still made in the USA.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 2:33:22 AM EST
No experence with an older skillet, but my new cast iron stuff is great, not sure how it could be much better.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:32:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By V-Match:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Lodge cast iron is still made in the USA.


Not all of it. Some is made in China.

That said, the Lodge stuff is really good. I've also had good luck with some other Cast Iron stuff, and a Emiril-branded Grill pan my mother got for Free somewhere.

Amazon has good prices on the Lodge stuff, and when buying cast Iron, do not underestimate the value of free shipping.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 5:56:03 AM EST
Most of the cast iron stuff I have is close to 40 years old. It's the stuff that my parents bought when they first got married.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 6:03:20 AM EST
Most of Lodge is made in the US. The enamel cast is made in China, but I have several enamel Dutch ovens and they rock too.

Lodge comes seasoned, so it doesn't take you years to get the pan good and slick.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:36:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:37:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 9:40:19 AM EST by SplintNicket]

Originally Posted By kpel308:

Originally Posted By SplintNicket:
Most of Lodge is made in the US. The enamel cast is made in China, but I have several enamel Dutch ovens and they rock too.

Lodge comes seasoned, so it doesn't take you years to get the pan good and slick.
Keep your f***ing MAN CARD, cook some BACON, put the damned thing that came in the white in the OVEN, and season it in a few DAYS, Nancy!!! You then KNOW what's in that pan!




I need a man card?
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:39:05 AM EST
Ill tell you when I find a good woman that can cook and knows about stuff like this.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 9:49:17 AM EST
I have a 14" cast iron skillet that belonged to my grandmother, she received it as a wedding present in 1919 and it's till going strong.

Cast iron is cast iron.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 10:04:38 AM EST
I don't know if it counts, enamled cast iron is also good. Le Creuset is from France and it is expensive. I have seen it at Costco and Williams-Sonoma.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 10:42:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By osprey21:
I have a 14" cast iron skillet that belonged to my grandmother, she received it as a wedding present in 1919 and it's till going strong.

Cast iron is cast iron.


I'm just saying that "things have changed" since 1919-1960-2000

I've taken a magnet to modern steel pots and pans and had it NOT stick

I'm just wondering about the possible cast iron differences, over the years
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 10:55:36 AM EST
Dunno. The one I bought from the Big Lots won't take a season on the cooking surface. Always flakes. Back side is perfect (go figure).

Do I have to really scuff up the surface to get the season to stick?

Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:00:01 AM EST
Lodge is the only name to go with !
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:02:05 AM EST
I can't imagine they would be any different.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:02:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By KG5S:
Lodge is the only name to go with !


Yup. I have tons. My wife is the ONLY women in her family that's not consistently anemic. Food tastes better out of cast iron (usually).
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:04:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By 22bad:
Modern day Iron Skillets, just as good as the ones from twenty-thirty years ago?

As far as the iron that passes to the food?

Do I need to get an old used one?

or, will a new one work fine?


either will be fine.

I use the same skillets my Grandmother used, they are older than I am.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:08:26 AM EST
Lodge is the only way to go, it's as good as it ever as and made in Tennessee, don't buy thre cheap thin lead laced Commie stuff from Chinamart.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:10:10 AM EST
Wagner Ware from Sidney Ohio. Its a hand me down from a hand me down from a hand me down.
Who knows how old it is. It has a -0- under the sidney stamp and 1058J along the bottom.
Makes great BACON and is the only thing I will make gravy in.


MMMMMMM GRAVY
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:10:17 AM EST
If you have to buy new, buy Lodge. I have noticed that the old stuff seems to cook better - dont know if it is the iron itself or just decades of use.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:13:42 AM EST

Originally Posted By rxdawg:
If you have to buy new, buy Lodge. I have noticed that the old stuff seems to cook better - dont know if it is the iron itself or just decades of use.


The part in red.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:15:05 AM EST
just get a Lodge skillet that's stamped with made in the USA. You'll be fine. Cook bacon in it as much as you can (it's good for the seasoning, and is delicious for you).

You will not be disappointed.

Someone else mentioned La Creuset, most of their stuff is enameled. I have a dutch oven of theirs, it's good stuff. Very expensive though. IIRC, the molds are hand cast, and they have a proprietary system for hand spraying the enamel. Either way, there's a time and a place for each piece.

You can't go wrong with cast iron though. No man should know steak or bacon cooked in anything but cast iron.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:23:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By KG5S:
Lodge is the only name to go with !


I have purchased both Lodge and Wagner, both very good options. I also have a Wagner skillet from my grandmother, it's the smoothest pan I have. It seems too smooth to be cast iron, but that's just decades of use.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:26:53 AM EST
I have a 10" skillet made in USA Lodge, and a large 14" made in China Texsport skillet. The Lodge is better made. It has a smoother surface finish, and less flashing around the edges. The Texsport is crude, but still works just as good as the Lodge. I use it for frying chicken, while the Lodge gets used for steak, bacon, potatoes, and sausage.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:34:22 AM EST
Ten years ago my 75 year old Dad made a 990 mile drive from Liitle Rock to Tampa With all of his fire arms ,he only kept his 380 colt. He said he just could not see well enough to shoot the rest.

He also brought about twenty cast iron skillets,pots and lids that his mom used for the last nintey years. I had afew already but after cleaning what he had left, some had not been used for decades. I felt like I had been given some great family hand me downs.
Most of the older ones had Logde cast into the mold instead of stamped(meaning the stamp extruded instead of being punched in) After cleaning all of them up and using most of them, Im sure my son will pass them on. It is pretty cool to eat off of pots that my grand mother cooked my dinner on fifty years ago. I never use soap and always wash right after they cool down.
Link Posted: 7/21/2008 11:36:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2008 11:37:30 AM EST by psychotr]

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By Jrock82:
I don't know, I was barely alive back then. The one my brother got me for my wedding though ROCKS! It has a very good seasoning on it, and it is what my wife does the majority of her cooking in. We also take it with us everytime we go camping.


I'm wondering about their metallurgy(or composition)
in this age of mass production, probably made in China


Lodge cast iron stuff is still made in USA

ETA: oops beat to the punch
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 8:35:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By Knivesbatsnewtats:
just get a Lodge skillet that's stamped with made in the USA. You'll be fine. Cook bacon in it as much as you can (it's good for the seasoning, and is delicious for you).

You will not be disappointed.


I'll look for the USA
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 11:57:14 PM EST
We have some that are near 100 yrs old that are heavier and cook better than the ones now. Love cooking on cast iron.
Link Posted: 7/23/2008 5:39:04 AM EST
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