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Posted: 6/22/2016 8:41:11 PM EDT
Grass Crown.

The Grass Crown or Blockade Crown (Latin: corona graminea or corona obsidionalis) was the highest and rarest of all military decorations in the Roman Republic and early Roman empire.It was presented only to a general, commander, or officer whose actions saved the legion or the entire army. One example of actions leading to awarding of a grass crown would be a general who broke the blockade around a beleaguered Roman army. The crown was made from plant materials taken from the battlefield, including grasses, flowers, and various cereals such as wheat; it was presented to the general by the army he had saved.'









Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:42:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 8:44:00 PM EDT by cavgunner]
Hmmm

I bet i can make a good tomato sauce with that.

Looks like rosemary and sage. Thriw in some time, call Simon and Garfunkle were having dinner.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:43:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By cavgunner:
Hmmm

I bet i can make a good tomato sauce with that.
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Be my guest.

Save 5,000 legionaries in close combat first though.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:44:34 PM EDT
I will feed them and save them from starvation.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:45:44 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By cavgunner:
I will feed them and save them from starvation.
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As long as it's stated in your commander's intent, proceed.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:46:47 PM EDT
The Victoria Cross - cast using bronze taken from Russian cannnons captured in the Crimean War.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:48:19 PM EDT
What about laurels ?


And very interesting. Never had heard of that.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:51:04 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
What about laurels ?


And very interesting. Never had heard of that.
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Uh, that's what is meant.

If you look, any award or recognition earned in combat in most western armies are surrounded by some form of grass motif.

It comes directly from the Roman grass crown.

For example, I give you the US Army's Combat Infantryman's Badge:




Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:51:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 8:57:48 PM EDT by byron2112]
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
Grass Crown.
The Grass Crown or Blockade Crown (Latin: corona graminea or corona obsidionalis) was the highest and rarest of all military decorations in the Roman Republic and early Roman empire.It was presented only to a general, commander, or officer whose actions saved the legion or the entire army. One example of actions leading to awarding of a grass crown would be a general who broke the blockade around a beleaguered Roman army. The crown was made from plant materials taken from the battlefield, including grasses, flowers, and various cereals such as wheat; it was presented to the general by the army he had saved.'


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_Crown






http://www.romeacrosseurope.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Grass-Crown.jpg







http://www.haciendapub.com/sites/default/files/RomanCivicCrownJuliusCaesar.jpg

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didn't Caesar pass some act that allowed him to wear one all the time... then some guys stabbed him in the back?

Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:51:16 PM EDT
Jeremy Clarkson's series on the Victoria Cross impressed the hell out of me.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:53:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 8:57:05 PM EDT by Fulminata]
If we're talking Roman yeah the Grass Crown was the one everyone wanted, but the one I always thought showed off a legionary's big brass ones was the Corona Muralis, given out for being the first man over an enemy city's walls.

Later on the "Medal of the Two Swords" (the board keeps messing up the French accent marks) given out by the French in the 18th and 19th century was pretty interesting too, it was awarded for 24 years service. One of the most stubborn men to ever live, Jean Thurel was awarded it 3 times...yes 3 fucking times. He was born in 1689, enlisted in 1716 and served until 1792, he didn't die until 1807 at the age of 108.

In the more modern era I always thought the Blue Max was pretty cool.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:53:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
Grass Crown.
The Grass Crown or Blockade Crown (Latin: corona graminea or corona obsidionalis) was the highest and rarest of all military decorations in the Roman Republic and early Roman empire.It was presented only to a general, commander, or officer whose actions saved the legion or the entire army. One example of actions leading to awarding of a grass crown would be a general who broke the blockade around a beleaguered Roman army. The crown was made from plant materials taken from the battlefield, including grasses, flowers, and various cereals such as wheat; it was presented to the general by the army he had saved.'


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_Crown






http://www.romeacrosseurope.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Grass-Crown.jpg








http://www.haciendapub.com/sites/default/files/RomanCivicCrownJuliusCaesar.jpg

View Quote

Many US medals have wreaths embossed on them. Was this where that originated?
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:54:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By d_rob1031:
Jeremy Clarkson's series on the Victoria Cross impressed the hell out of me.
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How the hell did I forget that one, melting down the ordnance of your enemy to make medals for bravery for generations of your troops definitely is cool as hell.

And that was an excellent show.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:55:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 8:57:11 PM EDT by EvanWilliams]
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Originally Posted By primuspilum:



Uh, that's what is meant.


If you look, any award or recognition earned in combat in most western armies are surrounded by some form of grass motif.


It comes directly from the Roman grass crown.


For example, I give you the US Army's Combat Infantryman's Badge:




http://tuckersmallwoodblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/CIB_ACTUAL_Compressed.gif



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Originally Posted By primuspilum:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
What about laurels ?


And very interesting. Never had heard of that.



Uh, that's what is meant.


If you look, any award or recognition earned in combat in most western armies are surrounded by some form of grass motif.


It comes directly from the Roman grass crown.


For example, I give you the US Army's Combat Infantryman's Badge:




http://tuckersmallwoodblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/CIB_ACTUAL_Compressed.gif




I see what you mean.
It's not the particular item used that matters

My true last name means "laurelled" as in having been awarded laurels.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:55:16 PM EDT
I thought the Naval Crown was more interesting.

And, for a modern award, what's up with the Distinguished Service Cross? The other services have the Navy Cross and the Air Force Cross, so why not an Army Cross?
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:56:18 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By byron2112:

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Originally Posted By byron2112:
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
Grass Crown.
The Grass Crown or Blockade Crown (Latin: corona graminea or corona obsidionalis) was the highest and rarest of all military decorations in the Roman Republic and early Roman empire.It was presented only to a general, commander, or officer whose actions saved the legion or the entire army. One example of actions leading to awarding of a grass crown would be a general who broke the blockade around a beleaguered Roman army. The crown was made from plant materials taken from the battlefield, including grasses, flowers, and various cereals such as wheat; it was presented to the general by the army he had saved.'


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_Crown
didn't Caesar pass some act that allowed him to wear one all the time... then some guys stabbed him in the back?

http://www.romeacrosseurope.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Grass-Crown.jpg

http://www.haciendapub.com/sites/default/files/RomanCivicCrownJuliusCaesar.jpg




He was killed, foremost, because he wanted to grant citizenship to the Italian and European allies that fought alongside Rome.

This included giving them representation in the Senate.

A bunch of fat old turds, resting on the laurels of accomplishments 5 generations removed killed him.

They were hostile to the idea of "new men" whose recognition was based on individual merit and achievement as opposed to family pedigree.

GJC may not have been, in reality, a god (though he was worshiped by one as the pagan Romans)

He was, however, as close as mortal man has ever come though.

Before he was murdered by treacherous back biters, that is.


Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:58:27 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skinny79:
I thought the Naval Crown was more interesting.

And, for a modern award, what's up with the Distinguished Service Cross? The other services have the Navy Cross and the Air Force Cross, so why not an Army Cross?
View Quote


Firstest with the mostest.

All others are lesser derivatives.


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