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Posted: 8/8/2007 2:43:21 PM EDT
I recently came across the MS TechNet site at the suggestion of one of our corp IT staff.  Since I'm building a new PC as well as have 3-4 other family PC's in my house, plus looking to build a Windows Home Server for back up and media storage its very interesting.  The price is sure right...$349 for first year, $249 to renew.  A copy of Vista Home PRemium OEM is $111 at newegg, Retail is double that.  One copy of Ultimate is the same price as TechNet.

Can someone give me an idea of any reason to get a TechNet Plus Direct account?  Seems too good to be true, esp with my # of home pc's.

link
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 2:56:01 PM EDT
[#1]
delete post


i replied and didn't mean to
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 3:47:53 PM EDT
[#2]
is that the thing that gives you copies of just about ever current OS including the server OSes?
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 4:48:51 PM EDT
[#3]

Quoted:
is that the thing that gives you copies of just about ever current OS including the server OSes?


So it seems as well as Office and more.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 4:49:25 PM EDT
[#4]

Quoted:
delete post



What do you mean "delete post"?
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 5:18:20 PM EDT
[#5]

Quoted:

Quoted:
is that the thing that gives you copies of just about ever current OS including the server OSes?


So it seems as well as Office and more.


one of the vendor techs we use was talking to me about that, if it's the same program it definitely sounds worth it
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 5:58:37 PM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:
<snip>
Seems too good to be true, esp with my # of home pc's.
<snip>


It is, because based on the "fine print":  Software is licensed for evaluation purposes only—not for use in production environments.  If you are using it for your day to day work then you have "technically" violated your agreement.  This program has been around for a long time and is meant for support purposes and to provide demos to clients and the like.  However, I am sure that people use this program in many gray area scenarios.
Link Posted: 8/9/2007 4:33:59 AM EDT
[#7]

Quoted:

Quoted:
<snip>
Seems too good to be true, esp with my # of home pc's.
<snip>


It is, because based on the "fine print":  Software is licensed for evaluation purposes only—not for use in production environments.  If you are using it for your day to day work then you have "technically" violated your agreement.  This program has been around for a long time and is meant for support purposes and to provide demos to clients and the like.  However, I am sure that people use this program in many gray area scenarios.


Ok, good point.  I had not read the EULA compleley and missed that part.  I'll reread the whole thing and decide.

ANother question:  What software is typically available?  I was going to skip the option to get CD/DVD's, but curious if there has been any issues with downloads for those that use it.  Can you burn your own CD/DVD's from the downloads?
Link Posted: 8/9/2007 4:51:49 AM EDT
[#8]

Quoted:
Ok, good point.  I had not read the EULA compleley and missed that part.  I'll reread the whole thing and decide.

ANother question:  What software is typically available?  I was going to skip the option to get CD/DVD's, but curious if there has been any issues with downloads for those that use it.  Can you burn your own CD/DVD's from the downloads?


I can't speak for the TechNet downloads but I have an MSDN subscription which is somewhat similar but for developers.  If it's anything like that then I can say that the downloads are pretty good.  For MSDN you can only download using their download manager which installs on the first time you try.  I can burn those downloads to CD/DVD and for items that require a Key you can "request" them through the site.
Link Posted: 8/9/2007 5:15:13 AM EDT
[#9]
Great, thanks for the quick reply and info
Link Posted: 8/11/2007 1:32:15 PM EDT
[#10]
I have an MSDN subscription; it is well worth the money.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:36:49 PM EDT
[#11]
you could become a "partner" and get one of the action packs. Almost easier just to buy it though frankly.

partner.microsoft.com/actionpack
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:41:31 PM EDT
[#12]

Quoted:
you could become a "partner" and get one of the action packs. Almost easier just to buy it though frankly.

partner.microsoft.com/actionpack


I used to be a partner; the Action Pack is more oriented towards marketing materials and co-marketing. You don't get the wide variety of tools that you do with MSDN.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 11:01:35 PM EDT
[#13]

Quoted:
Because microsoft looks at things like total uptime and installed software when you hit windows/office update.

No, they don't.



Several years ago, a friend of mine had his subscription revoked and his certs yanked because of a licensing dispute with MSDN installs.

it certainly wasn't because of using Windows Update. Most of the cases I heard of was people that were reselling NFR software; the person they sold to calls for support, they find out the source and shut them down. I'm fairly certain that's what happened to your pal.



Mickysoft is going to roll out "software assurance" licensing for non-corporate clients within the next quarter... hang onto your wallet.

This isn't quite right, either. SA won't be a requirement; it will be an option, though.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 2:28:41 AM EDT
[#14]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Because microsoft looks at things like total uptime and installed software when you hit windows/office update.

No, they don't.





Several years ago, a friend of mine had his subscription revoked and his certs yanked because of a licensing dispute with MSDN installs.

it certainly wasn't because of using Windows Update. Most of the cases I heard of was people that were reselling NFR software; the person they sold to calls for support, they find out the source and shut them down. I'm fairly certain that's what happened to your pal.



Mickysoft is going to roll out "software assurance" licensing for non-corporate clients within the next quarter... hang onto your wallet.

This isn't quite right, either. SA won't be a requirement; it will be an option, though.


Let's just save a bunch of time here...

Call them. Ask them.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 9:58:27 AM EDT
[#15]

Quoted:
Let's just save a bunch of time here...
Call them. Ask them.

Which assertion are you contending is false?
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 10:14:35 AM EDT
[#16]

Quoted:
Let's just save a bunch of time here...

Call them. Ask them.


...or we can just read it from the Microsoft Update Privacy Statement.  Anything not listed here is rumor unless there are some hard facts.  If you have other facts then I would like to see them:

What data is collected?
The Update Services collect information from your computer that allows us to operate and improve the services, such as:


  • What software is on your computer, to help us determine which updates are appropriate for you.

  • The successes, failures, and errors you experience when accessing and using the Update Services.

  • Plug and Play ID numbers of hardware devices – a code assigned by the device manufacturer that identifies the device (e.g., a particular type of keyboard).

  • Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) – a randomly generated number that does not contain any personal information. GUIDs are used to identify individual machines without identifying the user.

  • BIOS name, revision number, and revision date – nformation about the set of essential software routines that test your hardware, start the operating system on your computer, and transfer data among hardware devices connected to your computer.

  • Product ID – the unique product license identifier that is included with all Microsoft products.

  • Product Key – the string of numbers and characters that comes with all Microsoft products, typically entered by you during setup to successfully install a product.



You can use the Update Services in two ways:


  • By accessing the Windows Update or Microsoft Update web site, where, in addition to the information described above, we will collect information about the pages you visit.

  • By using the Windows Update feature in Microsoft Windows. Within the Windows Update feature, you can choose whether to opt in for Microsoft Update.



When you use the Update Services, we will collect some information about your computer ("standard computer information") that is generally not personally identifiable. Standard computer information typically includes information such as your IP address, operating system version, browser version, your hardware ID (which indicates the device manufacturer, device name, and version), and your regional and language settings.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 5:31:29 PM EDT
[#17]
If your talking about MSDN y'all probably have access to SuS and or WuS.

If you've used it you know what information is collected.

If you are an MSDN subscriber you know that the PID is linked to a real name somewhere. The most recent version also requires activation for everything.

(Run WUS and check out MSIA put 2+2 together)

That activation info is theirs The update info is theirs. (and quite a bit of info it is)


Yeah yeah... I know. Just some paranoid dude ranting about mikeysoft.

Abuse volume licenses and subscriptions at your peril. These days, they just turn that shit off.  You get to recover your data from an install that suddenly became an expired evaluation version and started restarting every 30 minutes.



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