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Posted: 4/5/2006 6:48:19 PM EDT
www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1945808,00.asp

Microsoft Says Recovery from Malware Becoming Impossible
By Ryan Naraine

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla.—In a rare discussion about the severity of the Windows malware scourge, a Microsoft security official said businesses should consider investing in an automated process to wipe hard drives and reinstall operating systems as a practical way to recover from malware infestation.

"When you are dealing with rootkits and some advanced spyware programs, the only solution is to rebuild from scratch. In some cases, there really is no way to recover without nuking the systems from orbit," Mike Danseglio, program manager in the Security Solutions group at Microsoft, said in a presentation at the InfoSec World conference here.


So, who thinks Mike is a member here?
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 6:51:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:00:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/5/2006 7:01:17 PM EDT by fossil_fuel]
when you really need to get rid of pesky viruses and spyware, it's the only way to be sure.

www.nukeitfromorbit.com/
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:01:49 PM EDT
i completley agree with his statement

i see the damage of trojan, spyware infected machines daily. i've given up on trying to fix the majority of them. and end up doing a fresh install


antivirus is a false sense of security. you still need it, but absolutely non of them will catch everything.


Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:12:38 PM EDT
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.

Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:13:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/5/2006 7:15:51 PM EDT by THR-Thumper]
I'm pretty good at removing malware using a multi tiered approach.

If I have to spend more than 45 minutes on it, though, it's getting re-imaged.

Edited to add: The worst cases are self infllicted.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:15:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.




so are you a computer tech
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:19:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:26:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:
I'm pretty good at removing malware using a multi tiered approach.

If I have to spend more than 45 minutes on it, though, it's getting re-imaged.

Edited to add: The worst cases are self infllicted.



Yep, and the moron who self-inflicted themselves will spend the whole 45 minutes over your shoulder repeating over and over, "I don't understand it, I didn't do nothin."
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:30:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cruze5:

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.




so are you a computer tech



Yes, but I am not commenting on your statement. I am commenting on Microsofts comments. By those comments alone, they are admitting they either 1)can no longer stop the onslaught and/or 2)don't care.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:31:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.




Maybe if they spent more time on security, instead of shoving tons of completely unecessary features into their applications, and rushing the latest version of Windows to market, this wouldn't have happend.

Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:31:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stump:

Originally Posted By cruze5:
i completley agree with his statement

i see the damage of trojan, spyware infected machines daily. i've given up on trying to fix the majority of them. and end up doing a fresh install


antivirus is a false sense of security. you still need it, but absolutely non of them will catch everything.





The problem I keep running into in these situations, is that the owner has lost all of their or some of their original software, it never fails



Thank God I work under a site license! I'm the security admin, and I run Linux on my PC. 99.9% of the rest of the machines are all Winblows though.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:34:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.




Maybe if they spent more time on security, instead of shoving tons of completely unecessary features into their applications, and rushing the latest version of Windows to market, this wouldn't have happend.




DOS 3.11 Rocks!!
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:36:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/5/2006 7:36:34 PM EDT by DK-Prof]

Originally Posted By KA3B:


DOS 3.11 Rocks!!




It was pretty good, I'll admit. Last time I really liked Microsoft's products.


Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:39:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:06:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By KA3B:


DOS 3.11 Rocks!!




It was pretty good, I'll admit. Last time I really liked Microsoft's products.





DOS 6.0 was good, I remember waiting for it to come out so I could use doublespace
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:08:39 AM EDT
Common sense works fucking wonders... To bad most people dont have it
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:25:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Magurgle:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By KA3B:


DOS 3.11 Rocks!!




It was pretty good, I'll admit. Last time I really liked Microsoft's products.





DOS 6.0 was good, I remember waiting for it to come out so I could use doublespace



Uggg!

I can't tell you how many people I talked to that hosed themselves with stacker/doublespace.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:36:25 AM EDT
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:36:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 1:44:24 AM EDT by Sub-MOA]

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Why don't they see the answer? It's so simple a kid can see it.


1: The core software (kernel) is developed together as a series of highly interconnected files, each of which has
its own cryptographic unit in it. Each file is encrypted and each file has the keys to open the other files that it will need access to. All files are cross-checked for integrity by several other files.
Plus they're heavily write protected. Even the write process is encrypted.

2: The kernel watchdo software watches everything and NOTHING gets installed without explicit permission
from the keyboard (via direct monitoring of the hardware keyboard port) or by the launching of
a trusted program which itself is initialized from the keyboard, mouse, or other monitorable input device.

3: NO CHANGES TO THE KERNEL SOFTWARE ARE PERMITTED. Any attempt on the part of any
software to do this will be rejected. And remember, the write process is encrypted so it won't be
hacked easily.

Necessary kernel updates require the update to submit a strong encryption key to the kernel.
The kernel "phones home" to doublecheck the update and its key and only if all is in order will any updates be performed.


No software can install itself without explicit permission given by the operator of the computer.
No software can author changes to any part of the kernel. The encryption applied to the write process will help.


OK, it's not THAT simple but it's understandable. Heavy kernel protection with interdepenent protection mechanisms built in. Nothing is allowed to change within the kernel and the method of writing new files is itself under heavy security.


CJ





Users hate mandatory access control.

Let me give you an example: How many people do you know that run trusted solaris/aix by choice? How about Open BSD?

Even people that really need that level of access control will shortly find themselves looking for a way to circumvent it. Hell, most organizations can't even get a handle on something like version control. Forget patch management and intelligent backups.

Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:37:39 AM EDT
The beauty of it is, that the people who fuck their systems through incompetance and negligence inviting all this garbage into their operating system are the same tards that don't keep fresh images of their installs anyway.

Darwin at work.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:39:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:40:35 AM EDT
Well, just nuke Windows from orbit, then buy a Mac

Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:42:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.



Agreed... ONce something starts become popular people will attack it. Its only a matter of time before all this crap hits MAC, Linux firefox and so on.....
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:44:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.



Also, a good portion of folks who use Windows are computer-retarded and they don't know the first thing about computer security.

For instance, they think having McAfee virus scan software "automatically" keeps all the virii away and that firewalls will stop all virii and hackers cold .

In addition, we have a lot of folks running around on the Internet who don't even know what a port is, let alone how to open/close one.

It's just the majority of average joes are using Windows and the same majority doesn't really know jack about the technical issues, which explains why computer/software companies are able to make so much money off of gullible people .
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:45:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sub-MOA:

Originally Posted By Magurgle:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By KA3B:


DOS 3.11 Rocks!!




It was pretty good, I'll admit. Last time I really liked Microsoft's products.





DOS 6.0 was good, I remember waiting for it to come out so I could use doublespace



Uggg!

I can't tell you how many people I talked to that hosed themselves with stacker/doublespace.



Oh yeah, I remember it too, but with my 107MB HD I was looking forward to it. Then I found out it didn't offer much usefull compression and just slowed everything down. The worst part was not really knowing how much free space you really had.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:45:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 1:46:22 AM EDT by Ineedacatscan]



Also, a good portion of folks who use Windows are computer-retarded and they don't know the first thing about computer security.

For instance, they think having McAfee virus scan software "automatically" keeps all the virii away hat.

In addition, we have a lot of folks running around on the Internet who don't even know what a port is, let alone how to open/close one.

It's just the majority of average joes are using Windows and the same majority doesn't really know jack about the technical issues, which explains why computer/software companies are able to make so much money off of gullible people hr

you could say the exact same thing about anything more technical than a toothpick
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:46:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.



Agreed... ONce something starts become popular people will attack it. Its only a matter of time before all this crap hits MAC, Linux firefox and so on.....



Harder to write the code for a Mac virus, however, it's relatively simple for Linux and that could provide some insights into writing them for the Mac.

I worry about the fact that Apple has decided to use Intel chips, I think that brings the Mac one step closer to being easily taken down.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:47:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bob1984:

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.



Agreed... ONce something starts become popular people will attack it. Its only a matter of time before all this crap hits MAC, Linux firefox and so on.....



Harder to write the code for a Mac virus, however, it's relatively simple for Linux and that could provide some insights into writing them for the Mac.

I worry about the fact that Apple has decided to use Intel chips, I think that brings the Mac one step closer to being easily taken down.




May be, but there out there and growing in number
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 1:53:20 AM EDT
I've had plenty of my friends (who all use Windows, I'm a Mac guy) get virii, the common factor is that they received or downloaded a strange file, then opened same.

One actually received a link on AIM that was supposedly a picture, in reality, it was a .EXE file set to auto-execute after being downloaded, the person's computer was non-functional for about a month.

The thing that all of these have in common is that people were going to unknown web pages, downloading/opening unknown files, etc.

Moral of the story: don't open weird stuff, especially if you're running Windows. Exercise common sense.

Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:02:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bob1984:
I've had plenty of my friends (who all use Windows, I'm a Mac guy) get virii, the common factor is that they received or downloaded a strange file, then opened same.

One actually received a link on AIM that was supposedly a picture, in reality, it was a .EXE file set to auto-execute after being downloaded, the person's computer was non-functional for about a month.

The thing that all of these have in common is that people were going to unknown web pages, downloading/opening unknown files, etc.

Moral of the story: don't open weird stuff, especially if you're running Windows. Exercise common sense.




So true.

I have owned Windows machines for over 10 years, I've NEVER been hit with a destructive virus. Read, learn, act, and don't do something stupid. It's not rocket science, but people sure like to act carelessly with their computers.

I run Macs for work, and we've been hit there with a virus twice - so they're not immune just not as likely. Yes, I work with idiots.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:06:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Bob1984:
I've had plenty of my friends (who all use Windows, I'm a Mac guy) get virii, the common factor is that they received or downloaded a strange file, then opened same.

One actually received a link on AIM that was supposedly a picture, in reality, it was a .EXE file set to auto-execute after being downloaded, the person's computer was non-functional for about a month.

The thing that all of these have in common is that people were going to unknown web pages, downloading/opening unknown files, etc.

Moral of the story: don't open weird stuff, especially if you're running Windows. Exercise common sense.




So true.

I have owned Windows machines for over 10 years, I've NEVER been hit with a destructive virus. Read, learn, act, and don't do something stupid. It's not rocket science, but people sure like to act carelessly with their computers.

I run Macs for work, and we've been hit there with a virus twice - so they're not immune just not as likely. Yes, I work with idiots.



Yep, most of the people they get to do work on computers aren't the best and the brightest, hence the lack of common sense . I've yet to ever get a virus, and I've literally been using Macs since I was 3 years old (yes, I'm really that young). First Mac I ever used was a Mac SE Plus (had two 512kb floppy drives ) running System 6.0.8 .
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:13:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bob1984:
First Mac I ever used was a Mac SE Plus (had two 512kb floppy drives ) running System 6.0.8 .



hehehe....you are a youngin, I still have an SE sitting in my basement somewhere. My start on Macs was even earlier than that. I work in graphic arts so Macs still rule my world, tho PC's are more and more prevalent.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:14:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bob1984:

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Bob1984:
I've had plenty of my friends (who all use Windows, I'm a Mac guy) get virii, the common factor is that they received or downloaded a strange file, then opened same.

One actually received a link on AIM that was supposedly a picture, in reality, it was a .EXE file set to auto-execute after being downloaded, the person's computer was non-functional for about a month.

The thing that all of these have in common is that people were going to unknown web pages, downloading/opening unknown files, etc.

Moral of the story: don't open weird stuff, especially if you're running Windows. Exercise common sense.




So true.

I have owned Windows machines for over 10 years, I've NEVER been hit with a destructive virus. Read, learn, act, and don't do something stupid. It's not rocket science, but people sure like to act carelessly with their computers.

I run Macs for work, and we've been hit there with a virus twice - so they're not immune just not as likely. Yes, I work with idiots.



Yep, most of the people they get to do work on computers aren't the best and the brightest, hence the lack of common sense . I've yet to ever get a virus, and I've literally been using Macs since I was 3 years old (yes, I'm really that young). First Mac I ever used was a Mac SE Plus (had two 512kb floppy drives ) running System 6.0.8 .




I learned to write simple BASIC programs on 8088s
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:32:28 AM EDT
DOS 6.0 w/ QEMM kicked ass.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:37:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:00:26 AM EDT
How about severe, strict-liability felony penalties for distributing, using, or profiting from these programs? Sort of a Sarbanes-Oxley for the corporate cocksuckers who own whatever is being advertised/sold/done, with an opportunity to cut their sentences down to 10 yrs in FPYITAP by identifying the authors, who pull 20, no questions asked? As far as I'm concerned, writing, using, and/or profiting from what amounts to the theft of a computer and web connection is not much different from a burglary.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:09:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bob1984:

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Galland:
I installed a very effective anti-malware tool on my computer. It is called linux!

All kidding aside, I think most people could make do with a simple linux installation. Unfortunately linux is still a really big pain the ass when it comes to driver support and software installation. I spend a lot of time fooling with linux and cursing it, but one thing I've never spent time doing in linux is looking out for viruses or malware.

Galland



When there's a mass-distribution with all the ease and familiarity of Windows, and 80% of the world is running Linux, bet your ass there will be viruses and vicious ware for it.

Windows isn't a tight ship, but as it stands it's the one being attacked en masse.

THAT is the whole problem.



Also, a good portion of folks who use Windows are computer-retarded and they don't know the first thing about computer security.

For instance, they think having McAfee virus scan software "automatically" keeps all the virii away and that firewalls will stop all virii and hackers cold .

In addition, we have a lot of folks running around on the Internet who don't even know what a port is, let alone how to open/close one.

It's just the majority of average joes are using Windows and the same majority doesn't really know jack about the technical issues, which explains why computer/software companies are able to make so much money off of gullible people .



It's viruses, not virii.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:09:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By Bubblehead597:
Mmmkay. You know the situation has to be getting desperate if the powers at MS are admitting so. But to throw up ones hands and say "oh just reformat, it's ok" is BS.




Maybe if they spent more time on security, instead of shoving tons of completely unecessary features into their applications, and rushing the latest version of Windows to market, this wouldn't have happend.




+1

'Windows Vista' = We re-designed the user interface AGAIN to try and make it better for people who can't stop their VCR from blinking 12:00 & need a user guide to pop microwave popcorn.... Oh, and we bundled in even MORE software to try and make Windows the only program you need (besides the rest of the MS catalog)...

MS, you can keep it, I'll keep XP untill technology moves to the point where I have to update... I can see myself not updating OS software (Windows side) untill PC software goes truely 64bit...
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:22:23 AM EDT
Here is an idea for Microsoft. Shitcan ActiveX and Jscript and you will solve 95% of your security problems.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:22:58 AM EDT
I'm rolling back to my 1Mhz Z80CPU running CP/M! (later upgraded to EZCPR.)

TC
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:26:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:


DOS 3.11 Rocks!!





I have DOS 2.2 in the original factory box with all papers..... I doubt I will install it though


I usually run a Linux build, and for Windows I ahve it imaged and it gets wiped every 6 weeks without fail. I am on my MIL's computer now, and it makes me sick how infested it is
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:28:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 5:29:10 AM EDT by pdg45acp]

Originally Posted By TowlieMatrix:
.......................................
businesses should consider investing in an automated process to wipe hard drives and reinstall operating systems as a practical way to recover from malware infestation.

.................



We already have that with Ghost..

Saving images and backing up your data is the only way to go...
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:29:25 AM EDT
I wipe all my computers about once every year or so.

I did my brother-in-laws a month ago. It went from crawing to sprinting for about three weeks. Now it's fucked again. Why? His 16 year old daughter installed AOL IM to chat with her friends. Needless to say its screwed.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:45:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pdg45acp:

Originally Posted By TowlieMatrix:
.......................................
businesses should consider investing in an automated process to wipe hard drives and reinstall operating systems as a practical way to recover from malware infestation.

.................



We already have that with Ghost..

Saving images and backing up your data is the only way to go...



Altiris works well too. In about 30 minutes I could have a machine wiped, reloaded, and back on the network. Within a couple of hours they would have all of their machine specific aps back.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:01:34 AM EDT
We got hit last year with an Adware/Spyware bomb. We had to take 140 machines down to bare metal and rebuild each one. We are now deploying Novell's Zenworks across the enterprise. When completed, we should be able to rebuild every machine in the building within a few hours (or less). Keep your fingers crossed.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:18:28 AM EDT
Vista is supposed to be set up with more attention to security and holes than XP was.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:21:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By raven:
Vista is supposed to be set up with more attention to security and holes than XP was.



I'll hold my breath.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:24:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wolf_Warrior:
We got hit last year with an Adware/Spyware bomb. We had to take 140 machines down to bare metal and rebuild each one. We are now deploying Novell's Zenworks across the enterprise. When completed, we should be able to rebuild every machine in the building within a few hours (or less). Keep your fingers crossed.



What version of Zen are have you deployed?

The reason I ask is I am about to do the same thing here, I run Win XP on desktops, NW 6.5 servers, GroupWise 7 Email, and ZenWorks 7.

Spyware and Adware eats Xp alive and spending hours removing it is complete nonsense. I have close to 400 PCs and 4 hours to remove infections is out of the question.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:31:48 AM EDT
My dad got one that I could not remove. When I finally broke down to format the drive, it turned out that the malware had partitioned a tiny, invisible drive and the program was running off of that. I don't really understand how these companies don't get their doors kicked in and their machines smashed.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 6:31:55 AM EDT
We use Altiris at work, too. Usually, we don't even have to go to the machine. Remotely, we can reimage a machine then install all of the software back onto it with a couple of mouse clicks. The only thing we have to do manually is set the user's Outlook back up.
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