Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 10/3/2004 8:17:12 AM EST
I've seen them mentioned several times in crime fiction. I know they'd be illegal as hell to use, probably even to own or manufacture, but has anyone ever done the Pepsi challenge on ballistic gelatin/pot roasts, etc.?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:17:59 AM EST
Doesn't do anything. It just SOUNDS evil, I guess.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:20:17 AM EST
I suppose the thought that anybody you shot that survived would twitch like Joe Cocker/Keith Richards might be slightly amusing...
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:21:45 AM EST
I've heard that it will make the bullet explode when you hit something solid. But my bullets pretty much explode when they hit the gong anyway.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:26:18 AM EST
Slower than lead poisoning.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:27:32 AM EST

They work best out of a .38, on 25 foot great white sharks.

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:28:21 AM EST
Yeah, pretty useless.

Side note: Why would they be illegal?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:29:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gloftoe:
Yeah, pretty useless.

Side note: Why would they be illegal?



Some asshole of a prosecutor would probably call them "poisoned bullets".
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:31:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By QuietShootr:

Originally Posted By Gloftoe:
Yeah, pretty useless.

Side note: Why would they be illegal?



Some asshole of a prosecutor would probably call them "poisoned bullets".


Because we wouldn't want bullets that kill people, right?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:31:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 8:32:36 AM EST by RABID]
The idea is that mercury, being a liquid can't be compressed any more than it already is, so the force of impact shatters the projectile, causing fragmentation. I don't know if it works or not, but I saw a guy bore out a lead for his .45-70, almost to the bottom, just big enough so a .22 short casing could slide in but the rim would stop flush the nose of the lead. inside the cavity under the rimfires primer was some type of pistol powder. It really went bang when it hit a gong close to dark, pretty good flash. I'd never have the guts to try it though.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:34:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 8:44:33 AM EST by operatorerror]
I think that the theory on mercury filled hollow points is the mercury transfers the energy to the tissue causing severe damage. Or something like that.

I don't know how you make regular old mercury "explode".

I guess some research is called for. I need a danged google button on this keyboard.

Edited to add that google has a bunch of info about mercury tipped bullets. From game sites. Pathetic.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:37:28 AM EST

. I need a danged google button on this keyboard


Actually if you are using IE you can download the google toolbar, that way you will a little search box at your fingertips at all times.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:38:09 AM EST
It seemed to work for Edward Fox in "The Day of the Jackal".
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:39:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 8:39:54 AM EST by Aalmeron]
anyone have any old thermomiters (sp?), a drill, and a few spare bullets?

post pics :D
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:40:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By spm681:

. I need a danged google button on this keyboard


Actually if you are using IE you can download the google toolbar, that way you will a little search box at your fingertips at all times.



I'm at work. Can't download shit. Unless I want to get disciplined.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:41:03 AM EST
I think depending on the amount of powder behind the original bullet, you may be adding enough weight to the bullet that your mercury round will raise the psi in the chamber above safe levels and you will end up losing a hand. Doesnt sound like a good idea as far as exploding bullet ideas go.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:42:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By RABID:
The idea is that mercury, being a liquid can't be compressed any more than it already is, so the force of impact shatters the projectile, causing fragmentation. I don't know if it works or not, but I saw a guy bore out a lead for his .45-70, almost to the bottom, just big enough so a .22 short casing could slide in but the rim would stop flush the nose of the lead. inside the cavity under the rimfires primer was some type of pistol powder. It really went bang when it hit a gong close to dark, pretty good flash. I'd never have the guts to try it though.



Wouldn't a possible advantage be that your bullet would retain its mass, mercury being heavier than air?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:45:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2004 8:46:32 AM EST by DK-Prof]
I've tried it when I was in high school - back in the old country. I was the chemistry lab assistant so I could pretty much filch mercury and other chemicals at will. (A couple of my buddies and I also made self-igniting motovos - instead of needing to light it, we attched two thin test tubes that had two different chemicals that would ignite when mixed - so when you threw it, the two test tubes taped together to the outside of the bottle woudl shatter, causing the ingition - which would then light the gasoline inside the bottle. It actually worked pretty well. )

Anyhoo- back to the mercury-filled bullets. Ironically, I hadn't seen Jaws, but I tried it in a .38 - hollowing out a regular lead bullet, pouring mercury in (with a pipette) and then sealing it with wax.

I tried shooting regular loads, as well as the mercury-filled loads, through phonebooks in my back yard, and the mercury-filled ones DID seem to tear much larger "exit" holes in the books, and really messed them up much more. Don't know what the differences would be in gelatin, or ham, or whatever - but there definitely appeared to be a difference.

btw - I thought the whole point of mercury-filled bullets was that they expanded much more (being a liquid), but retained their momentum because mercury is such a heavy metal. Like an expanding hollow-point, but even more effective.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:45:32 AM EST
Well, it is dense, but theoretically any liquid should do it, sort of being driven backwards in the cavity on impact acting like those remington bronze points, splitting back the projy, albeit more violently. It would have a ballistic advantage though, being heavier.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:52:15 AM EST
Why? hopefully he'll just die from the bullet impact.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:57:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:58:21 AM EST
If you had a nice size cavitiy inside of the round, couldn't it cause a tumbling effect when the bullet hit flesh?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:58:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:
Just remember playing with mercury is a dangerous thing.




Heh - maybe that's why I'm mad as a hatter
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:01:53 AM EST
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
I've tried it when I was in high school - back in the old country. I was the chemistry lab assistant so I could pretty much filch mercury and other chemicals at will. (A couple of my buddies and I also made self-igniting motovos - instead of needing to light it, we attched two thin test tubes that had two different chemicals that would ignite when mixed - so when you threw it, the two test tubes taped together to the outside of the bottle woudl shatter, causing the ingition - which would then light the gasoline inside the bottle. It actually worked pretty well. )

I'm guessing Potassium Chlorate & Sugar in test tube one, Sulfuric Acid in test tube two?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:02:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By Paul:
Just remember playing with mercury is a dangerous thing.




Heh - maybe that's why I'm mad as a hatter


Had a mercury thermometer break in my mouth once when I was little, maybe that explains a lot about me
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:12:43 AM EST

Anyone who survives would suffer the remainder of their days with Gluten digestion intolerance, how evil!
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:14:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By crurifragium:
Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
I've tried it when I was in high school - back in the old country. I was the chemistry lab assistant so I could pretty much filch mercury and other chemicals at will. (A couple of my buddies and I also made self-igniting motovos - instead of needing to light it, we attched two thin test tubes that had two different chemicals that would ignite when mixed - so when you threw it, the two test tubes taped together to the outside of the bottle woudl shatter, causing the ingition - which would then light the gasoline inside the bottle. It actually worked pretty well. )

I'm guessing Potassium Chlorate & Sugar in test tube one, Sulfuric Acid in test tube two?




It was a LONG time a go, but that sounds vaguely familiar - high school is pretty much the last time I did anything even remotely to do with chemistry. I remember we also tried to make TNT - since we had plenty of tolouene, but it turned out to be pretyt difficult, and we never suceeded.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:16:50 AM EST
I know for a fact that lighter flints in .22s make a nice little shower of sparks when shot at a gong. Never had the urge to try the mercury thing.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:34:30 AM EST
I know for a fact (first hand story) that the Israeli's have used mercury-filled .22lr's in beretta 21a's for close-up hits. The person I know who was a commando for 25 years and recently immigrated said used the combo to go through the front windshield of a bus and into a terrorist asshole's eyeball. Apparently it is very effective. I always thought it was a myth too. I would be curious to see some ballistic testing.

Doc
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:43:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By Paul:
Just remember playing with mercury is a dangerous thing.



And it's not the skin contact that'll get you, it's the vapor.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:43:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By RABID:
The idea is that mercury, being a liquid can't be compressed any more than it already is, so the force of impact shatters the projectile, causing fragmentation. I don't know if it works or not, but I saw a guy bore out a lead for his .45-70, almost to the bottom, just big enough so a .22 short casing could slide in but the rim would stop flush the nose of the lead. inside the cavity under the rimfires primer was some type of pistol powder. It really went bang when it hit a gong close to dark, pretty good flash. I'd never have the guts to try it though.



Any chance of that .22 slug coming back at you?
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:51:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By DoctorNo:
I know for a fact (first hand story) that the Israeli's have used mercury-filled .22lr's in beretta 21a's for close-up hits. The person I know who was a commando for 25 years and recently immigrated said used the combo to go through the front windshield of a bus and into a terrorist asshole's eyeball. Apparently it is very effective. I always thought it was a myth too. I would be curious to see some ballistic testing.

Doc



? I wouldn't want to stand behind a windshield and test this story out. Are you saying that a single shot from a .22 long rifle traveled a certain distance, completely penetrated a windshield of a vehicle and then had enough velocity to go through an eyeball into the brain to kill a BG? Not exactly something you could practice everyday.

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:01:10 AM EST
This is what happens when you don't take chemistry in HS. I guess nobody's old enough to remember the old metal fillings in their teeth. Made of mercury and lead. It's called an AMALGAM. Mercury dissolves the lead, forms an alloy harder than both. No longer used because of the gradual leaching of both metals into your body. Actually, they use silver, I think. Still, mercury dissolves most non-ferrous metals the same way, so there's no way that would work, unless you coated the cavity with wax first. Even then, I call BS. Plain oil would work, if it worked.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 11:08:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By jor-el:
This is what happens when you don't take chemistry in HS. I guess nobody's old enough to remember the old metal fillings in their teeth. Made of mercury and lead. It's called an AMALGAM. Mercury dissolves the lead, forms an alloy harder than both. No longer used because of the gradual leaching of both metals into your body. Actually, they use silver, I think. Still, mercury dissolves most non-ferrous metals the same way, so there's no way that would work, unless you coated the cavity with wax first. Even then, I call BS. Plain oil would work, if it worked.


I'm not old enough to remember that, but a buddy at work is.
His doc wants to drill them all out and replace them.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 12:12:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By ED_P:
Anyone who survives would suffer the remainder of their days with Gluten digestion intolerance, how evil!



And their future children would have multiple limbs like a octopus.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 12:15:51 PM EST
Originally posted by M193: Any chance of the .22 slug coming back at you?

No, there was no .22 slug, just a rearward facing shell casing full of pistol powder.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:05:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By Pangea:
? I wouldn't want to stand behind a windshield and test this story out. Are you saying that a single shot from a .22 long rifle traveled a certain distance, completely penetrated a windshield of a vehicle and then had enough velocity to go through an eyeball into the brain to kill a BG? Not exactly something you could practice everyday.




Yep. He was underneath the bus, and when his team got the 'go' signal, he slid out from underneath on a mechanic's sled, stopped, and bang bang. Interesting story.

I'm sure guys who do this 'for a living' could find some auto glass to practice on. Shouldn't be that hard.

I'm curious if the mercury would add to penetration, or would it just have more of a 'lead tip' effect once it hit the final target.

Like I said, I would be very interested in any ballistic testing. :)

Doc
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:07:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoctorNo:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
? I wouldn't want to stand behind a windshield and test this story out. Are you saying that a single shot from a .22 long rifle traveled a certain distance, completely penetrated a windshield of a vehicle and then had enough velocity to go through an eyeball into the brain to kill a BG? Not exactly something you could practice everyday.




Yep. He was underneath the bus, and when his team got the 'go' signal, he slid out from underneath on a mechanic's sled, stopped, and bang bang. Interesting story.

I'm sure guys who do this 'for a living' could find some auto glass to practice on. Shouldn't be that hard.

I'm curious if the mercury would add to penetration, or would it just have more of a 'lead tip' effect once it hit the final target.

Like I said, I would be very interested in any ballistic testing. :)

Doc




My guess is that a .22 with mercury in it would not be able to penetrate a windshield and still be accurate afterwards. It might shatter the windshiedld, but my GUESS is there'd be nothing left of the bullet after impact.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:16:37 PM EST
I thought Hinkley used mercury when he shot Reagan and Brady.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 2:46:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoctorNo:
I know for a fact (first hand story) that the Israeli's have used mercury-filled .22lr's in beretta 21a's for close-up hits. The person I know who was a commando for 25 years and recently immigrated said used the combo to go through the front windshield of a bus and into a terrorist asshole's eyeball. Apparently it is very effective. I always thought it was a myth too. I would be curious to see some ballistic testing.

Doc

My beretta 21a is a jam-o-matic POS. Maybe Mossad fixes theirs up, but mine won't cycle with federal hollowpoints. I cant imagine what doctored cartidges would do (jam!)
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 3:03:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 1:54:14 AM EST by inzane123]
Its not mercury but mercury fulminate that you want to fill the cavity with. Essentially, this is the same stuff that was used in percussion caps. Its a nice impact sensitive explosive. Of course, as to how useful it is would be another matter.

Just a little more info.

Mercury fulminate (Hg(ONC)2) is a primary explosive. It is highly sensitive to friction and shock. It is mainly used in blasting caps. Mercury fulminate forms gray crystals of density 4.43g/cm3.

It can be prepared by mixing alcohol (18 parts) with a solution prepared by action of concentrated nitric acid (60 parts) on mercury (1 part). The solution is slightly heated and maintained below 60°C. After a couple of minutes a reaction happens that heats the solution.

The fumes should not be breathed since they are toxic. Soon, mercury fulminate precipitates. The product has to be washed with water until no trace of acid remains. The manipulation of mercury fulminate is quite safe, provided that it remains humid.

Silver fulminate can be prepared in a similar way, but this salt is even more violent than mercury fulminate. It can even explode under water.

Link Posted: 10/3/2004 3:16:01 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:44:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Some days this place is frighteningly stupid.



And other days it's laughably stupid. I thought that was part of the attraction.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 8:50:37 PM EST
I'll wait for other people to test it out
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:50:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By jor-el:
This is what happens when you don't take chemistry in HS. I guess nobody's old enough to remember the old metal fillings in their teeth. Made of mercury and lead. It's called an AMALGAM. Mercury dissolves the lead, forms an alloy harder than both. No longer used because of the gradual leaching of both metals into your body. Actually, they use silver, I think. Still, mercury dissolves most non-ferrous metals the same way, so there's no way that would work, unless you coated the cavity with wax first. Even then, I call BS. Plain oil would work, if it worked.



Aww... you beat me to it.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 9:55:47 PM EST
Make it a show suggestion for Myth Busters
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:17:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By jor-el:
This is what happens when you don't take chemistry in HS. I guess nobody's old enough to remember the old metal fillings in their teeth. Made of mercury and lead. It's called an AMALGAM. Mercury dissolves the lead, forms an alloy harder than both. No longer used because of the gradual leaching of both metals into your body. Actually, they use silver, I think. Still, mercury dissolves most non-ferrous metals the same way, so there's no way that would work, unless you coated the cavity with wax first. Even then, I call BS. Plain oil would work, if it worked.




Maybe thats the reason then? It makes the core of the bullet harder?



I took two years of chemistry in HS, and two semesters worth in college....and don't remember a damned thing except that you pour acid into water, not the other way around.
Link Posted: 10/3/2004 10:56:35 PM EST
the germans in WW2 experimented with a supressed 9mm luger chambered carbine that they developed rounds that had cyanide up front in the nose section and the jacket was scored to break /peelback when it hit the target releasing the payload. From accounts the ammo could be fired in any regular 9mm and did work. Their is one account of the Nazi Ubbercommando Otto Skorzeny trying out one of the carbines on a large dog that happened to be passing by at the time by shooting it in the leg and withen half a minute or so the dog went into convulsions and expired.
He concluded that it worked. Of course there is the CIA cold war favorite substance as used on the phonograph needle size projectiles of the "M1 microbiological injector unit" and that is shell fish toxin.......a little dab'a do ya.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 2:43:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By crurifragium:
I've seen them mentioned several times in crime fiction. I know they'd be illegal as hell to use, probably even to own or manufacture, but has anyone ever done the Pepsi challenge on ballistic gelatin/pot roasts, etc.?



I believe your thinking of fulminated mercury , which is an explosive that is detonated by
pressure/concussion .

Link Posted: 10/4/2004 3:14:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By crurifragium:
I've seen them mentioned several times in crime fiction. I know they'd be illegal as hell to use, probably even to own or manufacture, but has anyone ever done the Pepsi challenge on ballistic gelatin/pot roasts, etc.?



Put mercuree into a 55 cal. kop-killer bullit and string a few feet of cannin fuze, and then put all dat in a assault wepon, and when you shoot it you'll be abil to blo up a tank frum five miles.....

Link Posted: 10/4/2004 3:24:47 AM EST
it is all BUNK !!! Mercury will dissolve lead, i use it to clean lead from badly leaded pistol barrels, over the past 40 years i have bought many pistols from ignorant people who think the barrel is ruined.

i made exploding .357 bullets by casting hollow points, filling the cavity with oil, then swaging a gas check over the nose of the bullet..., they are really devastating & highly destructive !!
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top