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Posted: 10/4/2004 4:54:27 PM EST
Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever. Meningitis, probably viral given her overall presentation and the type of white blood cells in the fluid. She'll feel lousy for a few days but should otherwise be fine.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 4:56:17 PM EST
Oooooooo... That is some NASTY shit! Poor girl.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 4:58:14 PM EST
One of my privates in the army died from meningitis. We were out in the field, and he had flu symptoms. Then they got worse, and we sent him in to the base infirmiry. The next morning he was dead.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 4:59:56 PM EST
THANK GOD ITS NOT BACTERIAL MENINGITIS!!!!!

Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:00:24 PM EST
My Sis in law just got out of the hospital with meningitis...there's a strain going around this area. Three days in ICU for her.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:04:23 PM EST
what kind of meningitis?
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:09:30 PM EST
They'll give you free shots at FSU. Other college students should really look into getting one, they're probably free at your school, too. I had no ill-effects, and it's well worth it since you're in close contact with so many people.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:12:43 PM EST
I hope you caught it early. A good series of antiboitics should put her together again hopefully. Prayers sent.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:19:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By Palo_Duro:
THANK GOD ITS NOT BACTERIAL MENINGITIS!!!!!




I had Bacterial when I was 2 years old.... almost didnt make it.

Thank God, I'm not blind, deaf, paralized or brain dead (although some of my friends think other wise)
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:20:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By astro:
Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever. Meningitis, probably viral given her overall presentation and the type of white blood cells in the fluid. She'll feel lousy for a few days but should otherwise be fine.



BTW: if it is viral you don't live Period! You can only survive Bacterial.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:35:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 5:35:57 PM EST by astro]

Originally Posted By GC456:

Originally Posted By astro:
Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever. Meningitis, probably viral given her overall presentation and the type of white blood cells in the fluid. She'll feel lousy for a few days but should otherwise be fine.



BTW: if it is viral you don't live Period! You can only survive Bacterial.



Wrong. If you could choose, the garden-varietly viral meningitis is the one you want. It is a self-limited illness; resolves on its own with supportive care and symptomatic treatment. Bacterial, particularly meningococcal meningitis is the one that kills most commonly. It typically strikes otherwise healthy people, esp college students and those in the military. This is due to the close-quarters living conditions. As stated above, there is a reasonably effective vaccine for this. Some of the rare forms of viral meningitis, i.e., herpetic are bad actors, but they are fortunately very rare.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:37:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By GC456:

Originally Posted By astro:
Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever. Meningitis, probably viral given her overall presentation and the type of white blood cells in the fluid. She'll feel lousy for a few days but should otherwise be fine.



BTW: if it is viral you don't live Period! You can only survive Bacterial.



Wow, that's odd, because my two month old son was released from the hospital on Friday. We spent two nerve-wracking days there while they tested for bacterial meningitis, and started antibiotic treatment just to be on the safe side.

Once the test came back negative for the bacterial, the doctor told us the viral version is quite benign. They sent him home and told us he would be fine. He has not had a fever or any symptoms now for 4 days. I probably shouldn't tell my wife you said he has no chance.

God I hate internet idiots!
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 5:38:43 PM EST
time for some acyclovir
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:06:48 PM EST
Astro,

An LP that YOU did?

If so, not very professional man.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:23:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By splanchnic:
Astro,

An LP that YOU did?

If so, not very professional man.



How so?
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:33:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By astro:

Originally Posted By splanchnic:
Astro,

An LP that YOU did?

If so, not very professional man.



How so?



he didnt give the girl's name.. what is "not very professional?"
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:38:53 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:52:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 6:53:31 PM EST by astro]

Originally Posted By iNuhBaDNayburhood:
Yeah, bacterial Meningitis isn't fun... When in high school we all got vaccinated against it because of exposure, and about 2 or 3 kids died from it... Was traced to the A/C system in the school, IIRC. Students were pissing, crying, and sweating orange liquid for ~2 weeks due to that vaccine.



It wasn't the vaccine, it was an oral antibiotic called Rifampin which is used for post-exposure prophylaxis against meningococcal meningitis. I had to take it a several years ago after treating a 3 year-old girl. It was the most aggressive disease I have ever seen. When she came in, she was awake and had multiple purple spots all over her (purpura and petechiae). As soon as she hit the door, it was obvious what the problem was. I put in 2 central lines--big IVs to go into the large veins in your chest--put her on a ventilator and started antibiotics, platelets, other blood products, steroids, and epinephrine and norepinephrine. Within 2-1/2 hours she was purple from head to toe and dead. Neisseria meningitidis is an absolutely devastating disease when the situation is right (or wrong). About 10% of us carry it in our noses. Think about THAT next time you pick...
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:54:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By splanchnic:
Astro,

An LP that YOU did?

If so, not very professional man.



Link Posted: 10/4/2004 6:58:55 PM EST
Most of the posts above are correct. Viral isn't that big of a deal .You just "get over it." It is also not readily spreadable. The "Meningococcal" variety that is caused by Neisseria Meningitidus (I don't feel like looking up the spelling.) is the one you need to worry about and need proph. antibiotics for. It is spread by respiratory droplets. When you see an entire dorm treated, you are dealing with the Meningococcal form.

I see meningitis quite often. I haven't encountered a Bacterial yet, so luckily the viral is more common. Babies get it all the time, and I have had multiple adults with it as well.

PS> It's not bad professionalism to talk about this, but I am confused as to who would do an LP and then get excited about the results.
tony, MS4
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:04:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hexagram13:
Most of the posts above are correct. Viral isn't that big of a deal .You just "get over it." It is also not readily spreadable. The "Meningococcal" variety that is caused by Neisseria Meningitidus (I don't feel like looking up the spelling.) is the one you need to worry about and need proph. antibiotics for. It is spread by respiratory droplets. When you see an entire dorm treated, you are dealing with the Meningococcal form.

I see meningitis quite often. I haven't encountered a Bacterial yet, so luckily the viral is more common. Babies get it all the time, and I have had multiple adults with it as well.

PS> It's not bad professionalism to talk about this, but I am confused as to who would do an LP and then get excited about the results.
tony, MS4



Not that I'm excited. I just figured it may be interesting for those who don't see it all the time.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:22:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By astro:

Originally Posted By Hexagram13:
Most of the posts above are correct. Viral isn't that big of a deal .You just "get over it." It is also not readily spreadable. The "Meningococcal" variety that is caused by Neisseria Meningitidus (I don't feel like looking up the spelling.) is the one you need to worry about and need proph. antibiotics for. It is spread by respiratory droplets. When you see an entire dorm treated, you are dealing with the Meningococcal form.

I see meningitis quite often. I haven't encountered a Bacterial yet, so luckily the viral is more common. Babies get it all the time, and I have had multiple adults with it as well.

PS> It's not bad professionalism to talk about this, but I am confused as to who would do an LP and then get excited about the results.
tony, MS4



Not that I'm excited. I just figured it may be interesting for those who don't see it all the time.



Understood. Are you a MD? I'm about to go into Neurology (fingers crossed)
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:31:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2004 7:33:25 PM EST by astro]
Emergency Medicine with Critical Care fellowship. Out for 10 years now. Do you have a black bag and wear a bowtie? If not, you'll never get a Neuro residency!!
(I was more excited about the fact that I got a champange tap in a 5' tall 270# woman.)
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:48:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By astro:
Emergency Medicine with Critical Care fellowship. Out for 10 years now. Do you have a black bag and wear a bowtie? If not, you'll never get a Neuro residency!!
(I was more excited about the fact that I got a champange tap in a 5' tall 270# woman.)



I'll let the neuro dig slide. (You forgot I must be from the Mid East or Indian)

The champagne tap is something to be excited about. My record isn't that good so far.
tony
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 7:48:59 PM EST
Astro, I hope you don't live in or near Gregg county. My daughter caught that crap about 7-8 years ago. Luckily, she came out well.Others here died or lost limbs. It was an extremely high number of people. It went on for about three years off and on before people quit getting it. She was hospitalized about 10 days. I'll never forget those screams of a five year old getting a spinal tap.
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 8:17:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By tisfortexas:
Astro, I hope you don't live in or near Gregg county. My daughter caught that crap about 7-8 years ago. Luckily, she came out well.Others here died or lost limbs. It was an extremely high number of people. It went on for about three years off and on before people quit getting it. She was hospitalized about 10 days. I'll never forget those screams of a five year old getting a spinal tap.



That's too bad. No reason for a child (or anyone) to scream through one. Lots of topical or intravenous medications can be used to make it a pretty benign thing. The reaction I usually get afterward is, "That's it?"
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 8:27:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hexagram13:

Originally Posted By astro:
Emergency Medicine with Critical Care fellowship. Out for 10 years now. Do you have a black bag and wear a bowtie? If not, you'll never get a Neuro residency!!
(I was more excited about the fact that I got a champange tap in a 5' tall 270# woman.)



I'll let the neuro dig slide. (You forgot I must be from the Mid East or Indian)




Dr. Archer kicks ass, and HE doesn't wear a bowtie!
Link Posted: 10/4/2004 8:33:59 PM EST
My twin brother died from meningitis. He came down with it at the age of 13 months and died very soon after that. What really hurts my mom and dad is that Dad is a doctor and to this day blames himself for never saving his son. 28 years later, he will still not see children as patients.

I suppose that since we were twins, I can still remember my brother. I have described images to my mom that are not from any picture, that are acurate. It shockes her sometimes.
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:05:00 AM EST
For the record, I'm not trying to start a flame war but "Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever" doesn't strike me as being very professional. I'm pretty anti-PC but this is a public forum.
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:07:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By splanchnic:
For the record, I'm not trying to start a flame war but "Just got the results back on a lumbar puncture I did on a fat chick with a rip-roaring headache and a fever" doesn't strike me as being very professional. I'm pretty anti-PC but this is a public forum.




He's anonymous, the patient name is anynomous, it's the internet. Why is it a problem?


No flame intended - just curious why "professionalism" even matters. For all we know, he's not even a doctor, but a 14 year-old kid who looekd up "meningitis" in the dictionary
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:11:08 AM EST
Point taken.
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:13:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By splanchnic:
Point taken.



Just wanted to add that I agree with you that for a doctor to describe a patient as "a fat chick" shows a poor attitude, and it would definitely bother me in person (or from a doc I knew personally) - just not on the internet.
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:20:23 AM EST

Originally Posted By astro:
Do you have a black bag and wear a bowtie? If not, you'll never get a Neuro residency!!



Most of the World will NOT know just funny and true that is!
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:20:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By astro:About 10% of us carry it in our noses. Think about THAT next time you pick...



no shit? so how does it get into you?

Link Posted: 10/6/2004 9:30:59 AM EST
Had a nice 7 day stay in a hospital because of viral meningitis. Not very pleasent. Well, the morphine all week long did help.

2 spinal taps in the ER did not help, since after my release I had terrible headaches everytime I stood up. Had a leak from one of the taps causing my brain to sagin my skull. How did they fix it. You guessed it, with another spinal tap and a blood patch. Another week of no standing, and then on 9/11/2001 the headaches finally subsided.
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