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Posted: 8/18/2017 3:04:18 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/18/2017 6:03:56 PM EST
If you don't mind developing your own film and wet print or have a suitable scanner they can be an enjoyable addition to one's photo toolbox. I had a couple of Bronica ETRSi 6x4.5 cameras and (as with others) if you can find mechanically good film backs they are great film cameras.

I now have a Yashica LM 6x6 TLR and several 9x12cm sheet film cameras and enjoy shooting both film and photopaper negatives.
Link Posted: 8/18/2017 11:18:12 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/19/2017 7:41:37 AM EST
I am currently looking into getting a Hasselblad 500 C/M which I have seen for reasonably prices. They don't have all the bells and whistles as the newer ones but they I just need one to go click.

I saw one on the B&H website for about 500 with out the backs. Don't know to many of the details it got sold pretty quickly.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 6:58:17 AM EST
I picked up a near mint Mamiya RB67 ProS for $200 on ebay two years ago. It was shipped from Japan. 
The light seals were toast, but there is a kit for the RB67 and it did not take long to change them out. 

I love my RB67. Best Camera I have. HP5+ and HC110 home developed. 
Valkyrie by Chris Barzyz, on Flickr
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 7:19:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 3:31:27 AM EST
For color I send out to "The Darkroom" and for B&W I do it myself. 
The Darkroom is a web site out of CA who develops and scans film for $11 a roll. They do good work.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 10:35:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 12:37:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CB1:
For color I send out to "The Darkroom" and for B&W I do it myself. 
The Darkroom is a web site out of CA who develops and scans film for $11 a roll. They do good work.
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I was just looking at those guys to do some developing for me. About how long was your turn around for a roll?

I like the idea that they can develop to photo paper as an option.

I wonder if they do nudes?
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 3:25:45 PM EST
Get yourself an Agfa Rondinax daylight film developing tank and develop your own 120 film. They no longer make them but they can be found in good condition used.
Attachment Attached File


Rondinax 60 shown with a 36U
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 4:36:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By talon370:


I was just looking at those guys to do some developing for me. About how long was your turn around for a roll?

I like the idea that they can develop to photo paper as an option.

I wonder if they do nudes?
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a week to ship, a week of processing at which they email and you can download the pictures in full resolution. a week to receive the negatives and cd of the scans. 
here is a sample of their scans...
from a 1955 Brownie Hawkeye  Flash with Kodak Ektar100, 120 film
mean green by Chris Barzyz, on Flickr

Canon AE1P and Portra 400. A little too much blue, but I blame the film. The above Ektar is more color saturated then the Portra. 35mm film
prepped for the bone-yard by Chris Barzyz, on Flickr

I made 8.5x11 prints with these and they came out very nice. If I remember, I chose enhanced scan for the Ektar and standard for the Portra.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 4:42:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/22/2017 4:44:18 PM EST by CB1]
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Originally Posted By RED_5:
I've heard of them..

looking at developing my own B&W... from the videos, seems pretty easy/straight forward.
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I got two 120 reels and a double sized steel tank for developing both.  New55 makes a good monobath developer for a 1 step process or you can do the dev/stop/fix standard chemistry. 

Personally, I use Kodak HC110 concentrate and make mixes for a one shot deal. 30mm to 1ltr water at 68f for 6 minutes, 1 min stop bath (water or official indicator stop bath) and Ilford rapid fixer concentrate at 8 oz to 1ltr for 6 min and a good wash and dry.
I scan with a older HP G4050 flat bed scanner with the aftermarket vuescan software and I'm very happy with the B&W scans.  Color, not so much at home. So The Darkroom is my choice for color.

another shot with the RB67 and HC110 developer
Valkyrie by Chris Barzyz, on Flickr
 
Link Posted: 8/26/2017 4:37:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/27/2017 10:53:21 PM EST by RED_5]
Link Posted: 9/2/2017 6:09:30 PM EST
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I flew that one back in 2010. Actually, I probably flew it several times.

Now, I fly a couch.
Link Posted: 9/2/2017 7:55:39 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/1/2017 7:06:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By RED_5:
just got home from shooting my first roll through my Mamiya

now, take it somewhere and have it developed, or wait till I get all the stuff together and do it myself?
first world problems.
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What did you end up doing?

How did the photos turn out?
Link Posted: 11/1/2017 7:17:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/1/2017 7:22:26 PM EST by RED_5]
Link Posted: 11/1/2017 7:41:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/1/2017 7:42:13 PM EST by 74HC]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CB1:
I love my RB67. Best Camera I have. HP5+ and HC110 home developed. 
View Quote
I'd recommend using something else than HC110.  I did use it at the newspaper darkroom, and at home, for awhile way back in the late 70s and early 80's.  But it is too much fussing trying to get a good dilution ratio and temperature for sharper, less grainy images.    It's darn easy to mix, and can be used after mixing unlike the powder developers.

I normally used accufine if I pushed the film due to the conditions of the assignment, but usually microdol-x since it was much cheaper.

Check out what Ilford recommends for your HP5+ film.  The photos you posted seem it have some more grain than I would expect from medium format negatives.  It appears that contrast has been slightly exaggerated to lend more sharpness to the eye.

Did you scan from negatives, or print?  If print, some of it (or much of it) could be the grade of paper and developer.
Link Posted: 11/2/2017 8:11:01 AM EST
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Originally Posted By RED_5:
I took the first few rolls and had them developed by the LCS.
they turned out alright.
Later, if I can remember, I'll share a couple.

I've since developed some 35mm and the roll of 620.

I have about 4 more rolls to develop, maybe this weekend.


eta: some pics here and here
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Originally Posted By RED_5:
Originally Posted By talon370:



What did you end up doing?

How did the photos turn out?
I took the first few rolls and had them developed by the LCS.
they turned out alright.
Later, if I can remember, I'll share a couple.

I've since developed some 35mm and the roll of 620.

I have about 4 more rolls to develop, maybe this weekend.


eta: some pics here and here
Looks good keep at it. I am wanting to start developing at home also. I just am not doing enough film or hell even enough photography right now to justify it.
Link Posted: 11/2/2017 10:55:22 AM EST
I have a Mamiya RB67 Pro SD setup with a few lenses and backs, etc.

I really like the ability to change films on the fly by changing backs.

I don't get much of a chance to use it due the relatively long process of setup for use.

I have mainly used North Coast Photo to process the film and then scan.
Link Posted: 11/2/2017 11:33:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 7:48:18 AM EST
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Originally Posted By RED_5:



changing backs is the only regret I have about my camera (M645)
the 1000s version would be a teeny bit better.

I didn't know what I didn't know. it's not a bad camera, and quite good if you factor in when it was mfg.
I have a full range of lenses for it that didn't cost a crapton of money to get. Almost everything about it
is affordable...except the film

Next MF will definitely have changeable backs though... and I have entertained the idea of a 4x4 as the
next step.. but I'm in no hurry, unless a screaming deal comes along.
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For me large format will have to wait quite some while when I can really take the time necessary for it. If I can't take the time now with a medium format then large format would definitely be a waste.

I think that when I do go large format that I will pretty quickly end up at 8x10. I don't see there being much of a difference in time between 8x10 and 4x5 so might as well get the much larger film area despite the higher cost per shot.
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 11:01:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2017 2:29:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By soncorn:


For me large format will have to wait quite some while when I can really take the time necessary for it. If I can't take the time now with a medium format then large format would definitely be a waste.

I think that when I do go large format that I will pretty quickly end up at 8x10. I don't see there being much of a difference in time between 8x10 and 4x5 so might as well get the much larger film area despite the higher cost per shot.
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Don't forget lenses. Always the most expensive part of photo equipment and as you size up they go up in price.
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