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Posted: 4/29/2015 2:34:25 PM EDT
Anyone here practice regularly?  Not exclusively, but anyone in their mid 30's train?

Im moving and am at the point where I am trying to evaluate where I should go from here with my training.

I did Tae Kwon Do from 14 to about 17, competed regularly in traditional kickboxing from 17 to about 23. Did sporadic grappling over the next 7-8 years, but I started back up with Muay Thai 3 nights a week about a year ago and am loving it. Have been mixing in some Jiu Jistsu between MACP and the gym I go to, as well as my brother in law's MMA gym he owns.

Now that im PCSing im wondering where to go. I love kickboxing and striking arts, been doing it forever, but im getting old. It helps a lot with maintaining mobility but im wondering if I should completely commit to something else that will be more applicable to me as I get even older. Muay Thai really takes a toll on my knees and hips, especially considering most of the time it's my second or third workout of the day. As it stands im slamming glucosamine and amino acids daily to maintain where im at.

Also interested in seeing if anyone else does martial arts regularly
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:37:18 PM EDT
There can be only one answer:

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:37:57 PM EDT
Not currently, but have many years under my belt.  Gracie Jui Jitsu is waaaaaay easier on the body than a hard striking style.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:38:08 PM EDT
I don't know shit about martial arts.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:40:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 2:40:56 PM EDT by navvet89]
BJJ is where it's at.



Plenty of cardio, little striking, lots of joint manipulations and chokes.

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:40:34 PM EDT
I am almost 52 and train Gracie Jui Jitsu.

Used to do various MAs long ago . . .
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:41:10 PM EDT
Been doing taekwondo and hapkido for 3 years, its definitely a good stress reliever, I will likely test for black next year at some point.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:43:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tweeter:
I don't know shit about martial arts.
View Quote



LoL....?
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:44:15 PM EDT
That kung fu shit don't work on me.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:44:33 PM EDT
I do gracie jiu jitsu 4-5 nights a week. Just started in December of 2014 I've lost 30 lbs in thay time.

Forty one years old btw. So I vote gjj.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:45:26 PM EDT
Did that back in my teens a long time ago for many many years.  Then I discovered guns, and found it so much easier to carry one and more fun to go to the range than to the dojo.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:50:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 2:54:48 PM EDT by jerrwhy01]
I'm 44 and currently practicing Jujitsu with a heavy emphasis on Small Circle on a regular basis, before that it was Aikido.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 2:51:18 PM EDT
<--------I regularly avoid her wrath, so I guess that helps keep me on my toes...
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:01:37 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By clinteastwood:
Did that back in my teens a long time ago for many many years.  Then I discovered guns, and found it so much easier to carry one and more fun to go to the range than to the dojo.
View Quote


I usually don't feel like doing BJJ but I feel great after I do it.

Frankly, guns vs unarmed skills is a "get both" situation. Realistically, using unarmed self defense methods in a real street fight is a desperate thing. But there are places you can't take a gun, and there are also situations you might want to handle without resorting to lethal force.

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:07:57 PM EDT
I also started with Tae Kwon Do, since it was offered in school as an elective.

Then did the silly Army stuff, then BJJ regularly in several units.

When I got out, I got into Wing Chun, which made me have to think a lot faster.  The workouts were very good with the guy I was going to in the Fayetteville area.

I later started doing the SCARS modules with a friend, and picked up some more Kung Fu based elements from that.

When living in Europe for a while, I did Bujinkan regularly at a gym every week.  I found myself using a mix of Wing Chun and SCARs, and BJJ when it went to ground, against the really experienced guys who had been training Bujinkan for years and years, and only the ones who out-sized and out-reached me could keep up, other than the instructor.

I spent some time with a certain group of guys studying another system that was interesting, especially given where it was.  PM me for details.

I'm over 40 now, and would gravitate to a soft hands system if you haven't studied one yet.  You're GTG on hard hands.  Soft hands will balance you out well, and when combined, can be freaking brutal.  Avoid disciplines with high injury rates.  That was really common with SCARS, and there seem to be a lot of injuries with Krav Maga.  I don't remember any injuries with Wing Chun, other than the conditioning of the backs of your hands.  They go from being weak, to steel-like over time.  I can put the back of my hands through drywall like it isn't there.

I would like a new system of empty handed martial arts where you don't mess around with uniforms, dojo etiquette, and dogmatic stuff, but look at body mechanics and the psychology of violence, and set up practical scenarios with vehicles, surprise, darkness, carrying groceries, things like that.  Basically run hood drills without canning sessions, then AAR them, and work on techniques to address them, then set up similarly, but not predictable exercises and sparring sessions that look nothing like competitions.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:11:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 3:15:27 PM EDT by FordGuy]
Originally Posted By daemon734:
Anyone here practice regularly?  Not exclusively, but anyone in their mid 30's train?

Im moving and am at the point where I am trying to evaluate where I should go from here with my training.

I did Tae Kwon Do from 14 to about 17, competed regularly in traditional kickboxing from 17 to about 23. Did sporadic grappling over the next 7-8 years, but I started back up with Muay Thai 3 nights a week about a year ago and am loving it. Have been mixing in some Jiu Jistsu between MACP and the gym I go to, as well as my brother in law's MMA gym he owns.

Now that im PCSing im wondering where to go. I love kickboxing and striking arts, been doing it forever, but im getting old. It helps a lot with maintaining mobility but im wondering if I should completely commit to something else that will be more applicable to me as I get even older. Muay Thai really takes a toll on my knees and hips, especially considering most of the time it's my second or third workout of the day. As it stands im slamming glucosamine and amino acids daily to maintain where im at.

Also interested in seeing if anyone else does martial arts regularly
View Quote

2 x a week, hour and a half.  BJJ and Judo takedowns - my BJJ is half gi, half no gi.  I am somewhere between 40 and 50 and love to make 20somethings beg for me to let go of them....or "tap."    Don't care how big you are.  The mats don't lie!  (but the older I get, the more careful I am with neck, back, knees and shoulder joints.....fingers crossed, no issues yet!)
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:12:40 PM EDT
60yo I still teach Judo twice a week along with taking classes. I also take Tai Chi classes and practice it everyday. Judo is fun and you can do it for a lifetime, Tai Chi is very interesting and mellow until you start Push Hands training.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:19:00 PM EDT
I started training in Wing Chun in my late 30s. Had to stop for grad school, but I am looking forward to going back to it. If you're looking for a good stand up striking art, WC is fantastic. Most of the schools don't care much about what you wear, or etiquette like another poster mentioned. They want something simple that works. I would also suggest BJJ for ground fighting,. Between those two, you. will feel 19 again. Or feel like you just got hit by a bus, whichever comes first...[;)
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:27:33 PM EDT
Gracie Jiu Jitsu here. Over 40...  Lots of benefits, especially compared to other fighting styles, and even more so as we age.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:36:47 PM EDT
When hard striking starts taking a toll on joints, switch to Judo or if you're really an odd one look into Sambo for a different spin (though you may loose some proficiency with chokes).

Also, as a different spin on your BJJ ... look into Catch wrestling.

That is just if you want to spice things up and look into different art styles.

Personally, you can't ever be too good at something.  So take what you already know, and get better.

“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who had practiced one kick 10,000 times.”
Bruce Lee
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Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:50:38 PM EDT

I'm 53 and train in Kenpo.
Sure it's hard on the joints but being sedentary is worse on the joints.
I wouldn't give up training in a striking art. Too valuable of a skill vs multiple opponents and you need to stay on your feet in a fight. Rolling around on the floor of a bar or parking lot tangled up with someone is just asking to have his friend kick you in the head when you start getting the best of him.
Ground game definitely has its place and we do some wrestling based grappling but most of it is centered around takedown defense and getting back on our feet ASAP if we do end up on the ground.
The main thing is to just keep training and never think your too old.

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:55:45 PM EDT
ridgerunner is a guy worth talking to, as is donS.  i seem to recall that fordguy is an instructor also.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:58:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 4:27:44 PM EDT
47 . I train in Kuntao and Arnis twice a week. I've always had a knife fetish
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 5:06:48 PM EDT
I own and operate two businesses ....on is a Martial Arts school... The other is a jewelry store.  Classes are run 2-3 days a week but I work out/train about 5 days a week. MA is a perishable skill so I have to keep on top of it. Im also 54 years old and afraid if I stop moving I will just seize up like an old motor.  

Keep working out if just a little.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 5:10:04 PM EDT
I did competitve Judo & Jiu-Jitsu for about 15 years until arthritis forced me in other directions. I now do Kendo which is more of a Martial Sport unless you walk around daily with a Katana.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 5:14:54 PM EDT
I do Filipino martial arts and really like it.  It's a combination of many arts and they center around a weapon, then losing the weapon and going to bare hand.  Look up the following, then find instructors in your area.


Escrima
Kali
Panantukan
Muay Thai
Silat
Wing Chun


Where are you going to settle?
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 5:22:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 5:23:11 PM EDT
Kung Fu or go home
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:40:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 7:41:18 PM EDT by daemon734]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kodan:

Keep working out if just a little.
View Quote



Im not stopping working out, the problem is I lift 4-5 days a week and run 10-12 miles a week too.  Doing Muay Thai on top of that it can get pretty painful on my hips and knees.  Some days after a night of tons of bag kicks I walk funny all day, and this is after years of training.

I manage for now, but im looking towards the future.  Pretty sure I can't keep this up indefinitely.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:45:38 PM EDT
Kaju-kenbo for awhile but moved and no school close by.  Would love to get back in it
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:46:41 PM EDT
Boxing, pretty much forever and I'm 46.  That 3x per week and weight lifting keeps me in shape. I am nowhere near as fast, and damn those gloves get heavy faster now than 20 years ago. But whatever you do, never stop, age will kick your ass.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:47:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:49:30 PM EDT
I'd like to get into HEMA.  Haven't looked into anything local yet.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:52:46 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By seeker1458:
Also, as a different spin on your BJJ ... look into Catch wrestling.
View Quote


Problem is finding legit catch instructors.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:53:04 PM EDT
No boxing......  I'm 44 and still run a 10 round circuit..2 x shadow, 6 x heavy bag, 2 x shadow with 5lb weights.  Get a trainer to hold mitts once or twice a week.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:54:44 PM EDT
28 years old, been doing BJJ and Judo (Purple/Green) about 4 times a week for the past 5 1/2 years.Started doing judo, became addicted within a couple of months, and started doing BJJ for I could train more.


Honestly, if you're really concerned about your body, BJJ would be the way to go. I love Judo, and I know some of the guys on here are pushing it, but It's really hard on the body.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:56:32 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Nailcrusher:

I'm 53 and train in Kenpo.
Sure it's hard on the joints but being sedentary is worse on the joints.
I wouldn't give up training in a striking art. Too valuable of a skill vs multiple opponents and you need to stay on your feet in a fight. Rolling around on the floor of a bar or parking lot tangled up with someone is just asking to have his friend kick you in the head when you start getting the best of him.
Ground game definitely has its place and we do some wrestling based grappling but most of it is centered around takedown defense and getting back on our feet ASAP if we do end up on the ground.
The main thing is to just keep training and never think your too old.

View Quote


OP already has lots of striking.

Besides that the "multiple opponent" thing is pushed too much. If it is a street fight with thugs you should be using a weapon anyway, if you can't avoid it in the first place. Most of us older guys have enough trouble with one opponent.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:59:01 PM EDT
Krav Maga for a 50 year old?

Fit. Bicycle racer. Runner.

?
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 7:59:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Kid_Sampson:
28 years old, been doing BJJ and Judo (Purple/Green) about 4 times a week for the past 5 1/2 years.Started doing judo, became addicted within a couple of months, and started doing BJJ for I could train more.


Honestly, if you're really concerned about your body, BJJ would be the way to go. I love Judo, and I know some of the guys on here are pushing it, but It's really hard on the body.
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In your case, sinced you are young and have a solid grappling base, adding striking to the mix would be excellent. Boxing or MT probably being the best choices.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:02:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By DonS:


In your case, sinced you are young and have a solid grappling base, adding striking to the mix would be excellent. Boxing or MT probably being the best choices.
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Originally Posted By DonS:
Originally Posted By Kid_Sampson:
28 years old, been doing BJJ and Judo (Purple/Green) about 4 times a week for the past 5 1/2 years.Started doing judo, became addicted within a couple of months, and started doing BJJ for I could train more.


Honestly, if you're really concerned about your body, BJJ would be the way to go. I love Judo, and I know some of the guys on here are pushing it, but It's really hard on the body.


In your case, sinced you are young and have a solid grappling base, adding striking to the mix would be excellent. Boxing or MT probably being the best choices.


I boxed for a couple of years, nothing serious. I love the sport, and kickboxing too (Glory has been putting out fantastic cards lately), just went all in with the whole grappling thing.
I have to move to San Antonio for law school in August, if the new gym has striking programs I'll probably dabble a bit more.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:03:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 8:04:04 PM EDT by BrowardMason]


Eta. Goddamit, fpni.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:05:29 PM EDT
Krav Maga here. More interested in the fighting side than the competition side of Martial Arts
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:06:27 PM EDT
See if you can get your coach to work with you on avoiding things that mess you up the next day.

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:10:59 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cubanchurchill:
Krav Maga here. More interested in the fighting side than the competition side of Martial Arts
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Is 50 years old too old to learn?

I am fit and still race bicycles with 20 and 30 years old racers.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:32:35 PM EDT
Been training about 3-4 days a week since 1998.
Took a little time off when my youngest was born, but otherwise I've been going non stop.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 9:09:35 PM EDT
Second for Kali Escrima if it's near you
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 5:10:42 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By crux:
Second for Kali Escrima if it's near you
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Ive been to a lot of expos where there was Kali/Escrima, but I never got into the stick/knife thing.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 5:14:43 PM EDT
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Break the wrist, walk away.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 5:31:08 PM EDT
I am 42 years old with two back surgeries and acl replacement. I do Brazilian jiu jitsu and muay thai 3-4 times a week both gi and no gi. Yep keep going op its good for you.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:51:06 AM EDT
48 and the hardness of a marshmallow, nowdays. Just now getting back into jujitsu with the boy.

My brief opinion on the OP's question:

As far as the toll it takes on your body; Who you're training with, and how you approach things has as much or more to do with it as the particular discipline or art you choose.

Yes, jujitsu and judo translate into "gentle art/ way" but that's misunderstood to be gentle on the body. In actuality it more correctly translates into "yielding" meaning you don't directly contest the opponent's force. Neither is particularly easy on the body, if you go at them hard.

Approaching either art aggressively or with an aggressive training partner or under the tutelage of a sensei who doesn't see benefit in minimizing injury will get you and keep you hurt. Training with other guys who have to go to work the next day and don't like injuries but who also are in it for accurate, correct technique and a good strenuous work out will allow you to take it easy on your body and still attain and retain a good degree of competence.

One thing I was impressed with the Gracies on is their very gentle training technique. That was the most important thing I took away from training with them.


To address LRRP's desire in a style: Look up Tony Blauer. A no BS, real world based approach. Back when I taught, I integrated a lot of his philosophies into my classes.

That's my $.02, anyway.
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