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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/30/2002 6:56:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2002 7:15:09 PM EDT by Hoplite]
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 6:58:40 PM EDT
Out of curiosity, how old are you? And it's not hard at all. Maybe a week and you'll master it.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:00:42 PM EDT
It's really easy. What amazes me is that you don't know anybody with a standard. I hate driving anything that I can't shift. It makes driving boring. Give me a 5 speed and a bunch of horses under the hood and I'm in heaven.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:05:24 PM EDT
Everyone should have to learn to drive in a manual trans. equipped car. It would cut down on the people who are driving around with their brake lights on full time................. Same foot for gas and brake, other foot for clutch.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:08:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2002 7:14:17 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:09:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2002 7:11:15 PM EDT by Adam_White]
I taughd myself in the parking lot of a Chevrolet dealer - I was working one summer back when I was in school and did not want to admit I couldn't drive a stick (needed the job). Everything went well my first few weeks. Then, one day my boss handed me some keys and asked me to pull one of the cars from the lot around into the area where we cleaned them up for the showroom. When I turned the key in the ingnition - nothing happened. I sat back to think through what occured and recognized the shifter! It took me a few more minutes than normal, but I pulled the car around and got it where it needed to be - stalled it a few times though. I stalled several cars and trucks that summer - I was always able to blame it on unfamiliarity with the feel of the clutch - different cars each time and all. If you can walk and chew gum at the same time, you will have it down in no time - especially if you can stick to one car! Incidentally, the first time I ever drove a stick in anything beyond first gear was cross country in Kuwait and it was a full sized bus! As you can see, I've never been one to back down from a challenge - pissed off quite a bit of Kuwaitis though as I got the feel for the whole shifting thing! Yes, I have been accused of having balls bigger than my brains. Adam
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:10:43 PM EDT
My wife picked it up in a day. Clutch lifetime depends on the car and how it's abused. Screwing up shifts won't kill a clutch as bad or as quickly as not fully engaging the clutch. This is called riding. Newbies to a stick are notorious for doing it, and it's the first thing that must be broken when learning. My wife got an earfull about not doing it, and thankfully didn't on my car. The process is simple. The clutch is disengaged (clutch pedal depressed), when shifting into a gear and stopping. Launching is the hardest part of driving a stick, as first gear tends to be very stout to launch the car. As such, you'll likely spend the most time learning to launch. You'll feather out the clutch while giving it enough gas to get it going, and then let out on the clutch completely. Then, shifting gears is easy, provided you actually get in gear. Take the time to "row the gears," or go from 1-5th or 6th, depending upon the car, while the car is stationary with the clutch engaged and the engine off. This will give you a feel for where everything is. Just push in the clutch, move the shifter into the appropriate gear, and then let of the clutch and press the gas. Having a manual transmission makes driving a much more intimate experience between you and the car. I don't think I'll ever own another manual transmission, unless it's a strictly commuter car. Even with Houston's traffic I have no problem with my 5spd. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:11:19 PM EDT
Just like these guys said,it ain't that hard.Just like learning too ride a bike,after a half dozen times you'll get the hang.Your brain just has too get used to coordinating your feet and arm. You won't break or damage anything.You might embarass yourself jerking the car around and stink it up by riding the clutch alittle,but the car'll live. Hardest part is taking off from a standing start,the rest is easy.Good luck.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:12:24 PM EDT
Once you master getting out of 1st gear, should take about an hour in a parking lot, you got it licked. And like riding a bike, you will never forget. Ever since I've been driving, I've been going back and forth. Cutlass 442 = Auto Geo Metro(don't laugh, I was in the military and didn't make too much money) = Manual IROC Z28 = Auto Grand Am GT = Manual Camaro Z28 = Auto You guys see a pattern here. I predict my next car will be a manual. Try learning in a parking lot first. Just geeting in and out of 1st and 2nd. You shouldn't screw up the gears that much.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:20:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:24:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:54:10 PM EDT
It's easy enough, though hills will give you the most trouble. The best thing is to find an industrial park that isn't busy on the weekends and drive around there. Try out all the hills you can. You will stall at first, so it's best to do it when no one else is around. If you spend a lot of time stuck in traffic, I'd recommend against buying a manual transmission car. As much as I prefer stick, sitting around in traffic for 15 minutes doing gas-clutch-break-clutch gets old really fast.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:02:44 PM EDT
ive been driving a manual transmission for 25 years. i never knew that you had to shift gears. now i know why the engine revs to redline and then explodes all the time! [%|]
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:03:59 PM EDT
I was 21 when I learned. I picked it up in a day, mostly because the I had to learn real quick, the only car I would have available was a five speed. Kind of glad it was given the type of car it is. The hardest part for me was learning to give it enough gas. The parking lot idea is great, starting was the hardest part for me. Hills were a not a real big deal unless someone was right on my tail. Of course where I live, hills really aren't a problem. I did most of my learing beyond that on the street. ARlady picked it up in a day, though for her she had convinced herself she didn't. I think you will pick it up very quickly.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:31:24 PM EDT
I learned to drive on a stick, and I think EVERYONE should be REQUIRED to learn on a stick (and where I live isn't exactly free of hills - East TN). If I have a choice, I will never purchase an automatic transmission vehicle. The worst problem I have is stomping the clutch when I drive someone elses auto (also called the brake). My first car was given to me and was an automatic, never again... If you are having serious problems on a hill and cant seem to get the thing to start going forward, try engaging the parking brake until you are good enough in gear to go... Then go and practice without it. Jonathan
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:20:29 PM EDT
Well no wonder this younger generation is so helpless - they can't shift for themselves. JUST KIDDING Hoplite. Sounds like everyone else has already covered it. Just practice and it comes easy. NMSight
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:23:49 PM EDT
I've owned 3 cars in my young life, all have been manuals. I can't say enough how important for me it is to drive a stick. They get better gas mileage, you can brake faster, you get more HP to the wheels, much lighter then autos, almost always cheaper to maintain, the list goes on. The TWO only things I can say the auto has going for it is that it makes rush hour less grueling and after you get past about 450 to 500 HP, an auto will serve you better on the drag strip. Please do yourself a favor and learn how to drive a manual tranny.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:26:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:27:07 PM EDT
Don't feel bad. I have a buddy who's in his late 30's who has never driven a stick (manual). No problem. I can get through 10 gears really fast (cab over C-8000 diesel Ford truck). It becomes second nature. Heck, I'm so good, I can shif for my friend when we're in his pick up. That usually happens when he's on the cell phone hand turning a corner.... not enough hands. And I'm usually eating a burito (sp). [:D]
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:36:55 PM EDT
Did anyone mentioned the advantage of being able to do things like use the starter to crank the car out of the way, or being able to start it up by rolling it? Hard to do with an automatic.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:38:07 PM EDT
Well, i learned to drive a big truck with 12 speeds in about a day. No syncomesh. that was fun. Compaired to a Big Rig, car manuals are totally easy. however, once you learn to shift a truck without the clutch it's in some ways easyier. Ben
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:41:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By prk: Did anyone mentioned the advantage of being able to do things like use the starter to crank the car out of the way, or being able to start it up by rolling it? Hard to do with an automatic.
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Good point! That came in handy one time to get me home when my starter went out. Installed new starter at my own house for $30 bucks. Bad situation turned good. chalk another one up for the manual.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 9:46:01 PM EDT
I got it down in about thirty minutes. Dad woke me up early one Saturday morning and said he was going to teach me to drive my first car which was a four speed BMW 2002. Well, his idea of "teaching" me was to drive us to the high school parking lot (complete with the driver's ed lines), get out and say to me, "When you've gotten where you can drive it come to my office and pick me up, we'll go to lunch." And off he went walking to his office three miles away. Stalled it twice on the way to get him and haven't looked back since.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 10:08:26 PM EDT
When I was 16, my parents went on vacation and since I had to work, my dad left me his 64 econoline van with "three on the tree". I had never driven a stick before so it was a learning experience. It got me to work for two weeks all I had to do when he got back was help him replace the clutch that I had burned out. They are not hard to drive, just make sure someone shows you. Clutches are expensive now.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 10:27:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hoplite:
Originally Posted By raven: Out of curiosity, how old are you? And it's not hard at all. Maybe a week and you'll master it.
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im 20, not sure how this factors into your thinking.
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Because manual transmission cars are getting scarce these days, I was curious if you were around 30 years or older and still not driven one. I think once you get the hang of them, you'll like stick shifts better. You have more control.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 10:32:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/30/2002 10:33:39 PM EDT by mattja]
Every car I've owned in my life had a manual trans. That's all I've driven since I was perhaps 17 years old. It's not difficult to learn, but depending on how stiff the clutch is, some models can be a pain to drive in stop and go traffic. Autos are probably better if you commute on heavily congested freeways. After a while, you don't even think about it. You get better gas mileage, better control of your RPM curve, and better still, a reason not to let your woman drive your car. he he Even all the years I drove in San Francisco I never had a problem with hills. That's where the parking brake helps. You put the brake on when you stop, and slowly let off on the clutch and the parking brake when you're ready to go. It eases you into gear, no matter how steep the hill is. You'll stall a couple of times, dump the clutch by accident once of twice, but after a while no problem. And like the other guys said, you can actually bump start a car with a manual trans. Try that with an auto.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 10:45:10 PM EDT
Im the same way, I hate automatics, i just dont feel like Im in control, you cant ever get the gear you want, however sometimes an outomatic is good, like when you have a soda in one hand and a hamburger in the other... (yes I eat and drive)
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 11:18:08 PM EDT
Your kidding me, right? 20 years old and you don't know how to drive a stick shift? I learned on my Uncles ranch in his 1952 GMC column shift pick-up truck. At 12! I couldn't wait to drive, I bugged the shit out of anyone who would let me drive. I was riding a Honda Trail 70 when I was 8, shifting gears, no big deal. You have never seen anyone drive a stick shift? Never seen anyone drive a shifter drag car or race car on TV? What a sheltered life you have lived!
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 11:34:47 PM EDT
I've taught several newbies how to get started. As mentioned, starting up from a dead stop is the hard part. This system requires the car to have a tachometer :). 1) In neutral, car idling, put the clutch all the way in and shift into first. 2) With the gas pedal, raise the RPMs to 2,000 on the tach. 3) SLOWLY ease off the clutch in one smooth slow continuous motion, no pauses, no change in pace. 4) As you do so, you'll see the RPMs drop a bit. "Catch" the falling RPMs with the gas pedal, working to keep the RPMs at 2,000 with the gas pedal while continuously easing off the clutch. 5) Once the clutch is out, you can do whatever you want with the gas :). This teaches the proper "gas pedal and clutch passing each other in opposite directions" drill. With minor practice, you'll do it a LOT faster...but this will give you a proper start. And given this, you can teach yourself. Jim
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 11:40:47 PM EDT
Dude, it's not hard at all. I learned when I was 16, and it took about an hour to get it right. After a day, I was driving perfectly. Not hard AT ALL. However, if you can, try learning on a European car. They tend to have the best clutches and are easier to learn on. Japanese cars have really soft and sensitive ones, and American cars have stiff ones with a long throw (get your minds out of the gutter). European cars are in between. This is all my experience though, others may disagree violently. [:D]
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 2:47:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2002 2:52:49 AM EDT by platform389]
Originally Posted By USNJoe: Your kidding me, right? 20 years old and you don't know how to drive a stick shift? I learned on my Uncles ranch in his 1952 GMC column shift pick-up truck. At 12! I couldn't wait to drive, I bugged the shit out of anyone who would let me drive. I was riding a Honda Trail 70 when I was 8, shifting gears, no big deal. You have never seen anyone drive a stick shift? Never seen anyone drive a shifter drag car or race car on TV? What a sheltered life you have lived!
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Actually not... The Army has put automatics in just about all their trucks now, even the 8x8 M1070 HET! The reason? Fewer and fewer people come into the military knowing how to drive a manual and the downtime repairing transmissions was killing them. Edited to add: We won't confuse the young fellow by telling him you can start a manual 4wd in 1st gear, low range without depressing the clutch! [img]http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/biggrin2.gif[/img]
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 2:47:18 AM EDT
I learned to drive with automatic transmissions, but had a motorcycle, so I knew the idea behind a clutch. My first duty assignment with the Army in Germany was my first encounter with a standard transmission. My platoon Sgt. took me out in a Jeep on the tank trail that circled the airfield, stopped and we switched driving positions. He was in for the ride of his life! He gave up on me after about 30 min and said I would eventually get the hang of it. We switched positions again and returned to the motor pool. I was handed my military drivers license a few days later, and to my surprise was signed off on Jeep with trailer, 2 1/2 ton with trailer and 5 ton with trailer! Needless to say this made for an interesting 0300 morning ride from the motor pool to the hanger during my first alert, with the designated Deuce driver on leave!
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 5:29:54 AM EDT
Start on a level surface. Depress clutch, put car in 2nd gear and slowly ease out clutch. Try this a few times then use gas pedal if you have to but you will learn to hear a stall coming or learn to ease the clutch. The part about the handbrake is great because it works when a truck is sitting on your bumper lined up with your tail lights. No broken tail lights.
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 5:32:50 AM EDT
Manual Tranny, I thought this thread was about that golfer from Spain. Never mind, move along people nothing to see here. [smoke]
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 6:03:55 AM EDT
Its not hard to learn, the hardest part is learning to let the clutch slip a bit when you get going from a standstill. You will probably stall your engine a few times, jerk the car down the road a bit, and get nervous with people behind you on a hill. But you'll be fine. One thing though, don't use your clutch as a substitute 'brake' to hold your car on a hill. If you do this much you will be buying a lot of clutches. Years ago my younger brother got a brand new Datsun 240Z. He burned rubber around town for about 6 months until he realized he needed to buy 2 new rear tires AND A NEW CLUTCH. After that he slowed down a bit [:)]
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 6:15:47 AM EDT
15 minutes when I traded cars in the 80's. The only way to go if you have a sports car.
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 7:52:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ECS: Its not hard to learn, the hardest part is learning to let the clutch slip a bit when you get going from a standstill. You will probably stall your engine a few times, jerk the car down the road a bit, and get nervous with people behind you on a hill. But you'll be fine. One thing though, don't use your clutch as a substitute 'brake' to hold your car on a hill. If you do this much you will be buying a lot of clutches. Years ago my younger brother got a brand new Datsun 240Z. He burned rubber around town for about 6 months until he realized he needed to buy 2 new rear tires AND A NEW CLUTCH. After that he slowed down a bit [:)]
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You will get much more life out of your clutch if you put the car in neutral and let go of the clutch at stops. I forgot to add in my first post that brakes seem to last longer in manual tranny cars as well due to the better decelerating characteristics of a manual.
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 8:23:15 AM EDT
If all else fails, buy one of them new fangled auto stick transmissions.
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 4:26:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By lordtrader: If all else fails, buy one of them new fangled auto stick transmissions.
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My finances new '03 Eclipse has one of those things (sportronic shifting system), dont really like it all that much cause you cant push in the clutch when stopping, and it still shifts for you if it thinks you forgot... Of course, I left a couple pretty black Js in the road when I stomped the clutch on that SOB... hehehe Jonathan
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 9:25:22 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 9:35:49 PM EDT
I just skipped all replies to say,learn on a 5-speed!
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 11:06:43 PM EDT
I had to learn a stick before I could learn to drive. If at all possible, try to learn on a pickup truck or a Jeep - first gear is lower (higher ratio) and the clutch is far more forgiving than it would be in most other vehicles. Since trucks are designed to pull, the first gear has the higher ratio and that makes it easier to "walk" out of a standing start. Of course, you don't HAVE to drive a truck like a truck when you have the basics - my 88 Cherokee enjoys blasting off on Acuras and Mustangs whenever possible... Also, I get 24mpg in my 88 Cherokee (4.0 I6/5sp) vice 18mpg in my 89 Cherokee (4.0 I6/4sp Auto.) It's nice to lose that 25HP drain from the transmission.... FFZ
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 11:30:04 PM EDT
Never had a car with a manual transmission, but, being 20 at the time, I had a quick fix for that -- College! I found a couple of people that were willing to let me learn with their cars. Took me a weekend to do it, but it wasn't all that hard. I'd avoid wearing boots while learning though -- it takes feel, and steel-toe/steel-shank "construction" type boots take a lot of that away. Now, the only reason I don't have a manual transmission in my car is that AFAIK, it wasn't even an option on the car I've got. Next one though... FOTBR
Link Posted: 7/31/2002 11:45:40 PM EDT
Yet another reason why every teenager should have to spend at least 1 summer working on a real farm.
Link Posted: 8/1/2002 2:46:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Hoplite: when you are driving on the streets, and are in 3rd gear. A red light is coming up, do you down shift from 3rd to 1st or do you go to neutral and brake ot slow you down?
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A question with a simple answer. Is it easier to work on the transmission, or work on the brakes? Gearing down works for big rigs and such, but increases the wear on the clutch. It is far easier and cheaper to replace the brakes.
Link Posted: 8/1/2002 9:21:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By platform389:
Originally Posted By Hoplite: when you are driving on the streets, and are in 3rd gear. A red light is coming up, do you down shift from 3rd to 1st or do you go to neutral and brake ot slow you down?
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A question with a simple answer. Is it easier to work on the transmission, or work on the brakes? Gearing down works for big rigs and such, but increases the wear on the clutch. It is far easier and cheaper to replace the brakes.
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To take this one step further into simplicity (no offense platform389) push in the clutch and brake until stopped. If you dont stop all the way, you need to figure out which gear you should be in based on your speed - going high will just strain the engine, going low will rev the engine really high... and its based on the vehicle your driving Jonathan
Link Posted: 8/1/2002 9:52:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Hoplite: when you are driving on the streets, and are in 3rd gear. A red light is coming up, do you down shift from 3rd to 1st or do you go to neutral and brake ot slow you down?
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Your own discretion is important. In such a case, I'd know the light... was it ready to change back to green? If I thought there was a chance, I'd downshift to 2nd. 1st gear is necessary only if you're at 0 mph. So, I usually wait until I'm at a dead stop before downshifting to 1st. Also, your synchronizers will make the shift to second more natural. 2nd is a better choice (usually). This is one of the instances where manual trans really outshine autos... you will always be able to accelerate better from various speeds, since you will know in what gear you should be. The other area is that you should get better mileage.
Link Posted: 8/1/2002 12:14:07 PM EDT
I like all 6 of my gears. [img]http://greghavener.com/images/zx6r1.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 8/1/2002 12:30:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2002 12:33:11 PM EDT by California_Kid]
It's very easy even if you learned on an automatic. My mom learned to drive a stick at about age 50, though she still prefers automatics. After a while your body will take care of gear changes almost automatically. It doesn't take much mental effort. Clutches are pretty forgiving but in the long run it pays to develop good clutch habits - Minimize the wear and tear (i.e. slippage) at startups, don't ride the clutch while it's engaged, and it will reward you. The original friction disk on my '85 Nissan truck lasted 165,000 miles because of the way I drive.
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