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Posted: 1/22/2013 8:33:33 AM EDT
Another thread (the male nurse humping a corpse thread) had a few guys bring up being male and being a nurse.  I figured I'd not bomb that thread and instead start another: Just curious if there are any guys in here that would consider going in to nursing, etc.

My wife graduated from nursing school 2 years ago and got in to management right away (thanks to a different degree), and she maintains that a man can get through nursing school easier and find a job easier than a woman simply because the demand is that much higher.  Of the 30-some people in her class 5 of them were men and all 5 of them had "up 1 level" nursing jobs (non floor nurse, or "specialty" nurse positions) even before they graduated college.  None of these guys are floor nurses and all of them made better wages simply because they were male.  I do not know all the specifics and neither does she, but even her instructors were telling the entire class that male nurses get to pick and choose where they want to go.  

I believe I would give it a go if I had to start all over again.  I think.  I'd almost consider going all the way up and getting my Masters in order to be a Nurse Practitioner. %75 the pay of an MD and none of the liability BS, or so I am told.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 8:49:43 AM EDT
[#1]
Me. I start pre-reqs in May. I'm pretty excited.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 8:52:08 AM EDT
[#2]


Link Posted: 1/22/2013 8:57:20 AM EDT
[#3]
It's a completely respectable job...  I don't see the problem.





If it was 1988 again, I'd begin my post high school education with eyes on being a Dr.!  Not saying I'd make it, but I'd try...
 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 8:58:10 AM EDT
[#4]
I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:00:57 AM EDT
[#5]
I can assure you that you don't get more pay for being a male. You just get to jack up your back worse lifting fatties and then get the combative patients
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:03:11 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
Another thread (the male nurse humping a corpse thread) had a few guys bring up being male and being a nurse.  I figured I'd not bomb that thread and instead start another: Just curious if there are any guys in here that would consider going in to nursing, etc.

My wife graduated from nursing school 2 years ago and got in to management right away (thanks to a different degree), and she maintains that a man can get through nursing school easier and find a job easier than a woman simply because the demand is that much higher.  Of the 30-some people in her class 5 of them were men and all 5 of them had "up 1 level" nursing jobs (non floor nurse, or "specialty" nurse positions) even before they graduated college.  None of these guys are floor nurses and all of them made better wages simply because they were male.  I do not know all the specifics and neither does she, but even her instructors were telling the entire class that male nurses get to pick and choose where they want to go.  

I believe I would give it a go if I had to start all over again.  I think.  I'd almost consider going all the way up and getting my Masters in order to be a Nurse Practitioner. %75 the pay of an MD and none of the liability BS, or so I am told.


Absolutely I would. Without a doubt. Don't let the stigma get to you...
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:06:37 AM EDT
[#7]
Been doing it since 1987. Never planned on it I had already graduated from college and was working in Psych when the State of NJ made me an offer I couldn't refuse. You may also want to look into going to school for a PA depends on your state what is more marketable. I would advise you not to go directly for your NP better to get some clinical experience first prior to deciding where you want to specialize. Then you can work as a RN and go to school for you MSN and your hospital will pay for it.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:07:41 AM EDT
[#8]
Let me get this straight.................your name is Gaylord Focker

Have a few male nurses when I work. Good workes, the girls love em

Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:10:05 AM EDT
[#9]
I'd take the $30-$50 an hour and not care what anyone thought. it's a good job.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:10:08 AM EDT
[#10]
my gf is in nursing school



out of 100 people, 4 are male.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:10:42 AM EDT
[#11]
one of the guys i work with is a male nurse.



i give him shit all the time, but he always throws it back that hes making over 20 bucks an hour there and when they offer him full time hes leaving so fast no one will know hes gone for a week.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:10:49 AM EDT
[#12]
Male tech/nursing staff members also get "volunteered" a lot to move desks, copiers, etc. Depending on the facility, basic hand-tools will be a helpful addition to your med kit, as well.

I would do a NP track attached to a specialist if I ever decided to move beyond technician-class. This looks to be a huge part of future healthcare; NP's and PA's will handle relatively easy cases while physicians are freed-up to handle complicated cases.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:11:02 AM EDT
[#13]
I did engineering.  If I couldn't be an engineer I would be a Registered Nurse.  Its one of those few middle class careers left where all you need is a Bachelors.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:11:36 AM EDT
[#14]
My wife has been an RN for about 3 years now.

I have seriously considered Nursing school as a second career for when I retire from law enforcement.

My wife doesn't think I have the temperment and I question if I can pass the math portion of Nursing school.

But I have definitely thought about it.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:12:01 AM EDT
[#15]
I looked at doing this 10 years ago after getting tired of working in IT.  For me I was out of school for too long and I would of spent 3 or 4 years doing pre reqs before I could even apply for nursing school.  I would probably be finishing about now if I was lucky.  I know a guy that travelled the country for 3 years, and picked up nursing jobs in every hospital in every city/town he decided to spend 6 months in.  He never had a problem finding a job.  He finally went home after all that travel and settled down but it also pays well, and when was the last time you heard of a nurse being laid off?  The school and exams are no joke though and you have to like what you do.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:12:57 AM EDT
[#16]



Quoted:


Male tech/nursing staff members also get "volunteered" a lot to move desks, copiers, etc. Depending on the facility, basic hand-tools will be a helpful addition to your med kit, as well.







Meh, so do I...  Such is life if you work in an environment with mostly women.  I'm sure I'll be recruited to take down the Christmas tree later today...
 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:13:16 AM EDT
[#17]
I know a guy who was a male nurse for years. He always had some sort of administrative position and made around $70k working regular daylight hours.

Seems like a pretty good gig.



My one grandfather was a male nurse in the Korean War. He's never talked about it and I always thought it was weird growing up that he was a guy nurse in the military





Speed
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:13:18 AM EDT
[#18]



Quoted:


my gf is in nursing school



out of 100 people, 4 are male.


And the other 96 are hoping to land a Dr.......



My best friend (and his wife) are nurses. He works in the ER/Trauma unit. He says he's getting pretty tired of it because of the influx of people looking for money who have no real interest or talent for it.



 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:13:56 AM EDT
[#19]
There were about 4 guys in my old firehouse that became nurses. Killer side job.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:14:21 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:
I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.


And puke, and piss, and shit.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:14:49 AM EDT
[#21]



Quoted:

You may also want to look into going to school for a PA depends on your state what is more marketable. I would advise you not to go directly for your NP better to get some clinical experience first prior to deciding where you want to specialize.


Good advice here. PAs receive education/ training more along the lines of what doctors receive while nurse practitioners are a continuation of the nursing field and really need clinical experience as RNs before going on to be FNPs etc. Nurse anesthetist would be my goal if I were doing nursing. I think that is now a doctorate program though, or will be in the next few years.

 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:16:10 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:

My wife doesn't think I have the temperment


Just because you'd tase the shit out of someone to make them take their meds?
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:16:27 AM EDT
[#23]
Nursing is the new " go to job " after retirement for alot of the fire fighters I work with. I'm  considering it my self.
I'm thinking of starting with a 2 year degree and moving up from there. I don't see any stigma about it, in fact some of the
guys that have done that, are getting more leg than they know what to do with, along with a decent pay check. Thats a good
combo.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:16:53 AM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
I did engineering.  If I couldn't be an engineer I would be a Registered Nurse.  Its one of those few middle class careers left where all you need is a Bachelors.


You don't even need a BSN to get hired, it helps, but you can get hired with an ASN.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:17:23 AM EDT
[#25]
Quoted:
I can assure you that you don't get more pay for being a male. You just get to jack up your back worse lifting fatties and then get the combative patients


This is how I have perceived it as well.  (I work in clinical administration we have a couple male nurses in our clinic).
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:17:38 AM EDT
[#26]
I worked in a hospital for years. Inpatient nursing sucks. ED and outpatient isnt as bad. Easy way to meet women
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:18:55 AM EDT
[#27]
I am in a nursing program now. I'm doing a bridge program from paramedic to RN.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:19:34 AM EDT
[#28]
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.


And puke, and piss, and shit.


Much of that depends on what kind of nursing you do.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:25:19 AM EDT
[#29]
My career trajectory has not been unusual as a male nurse with a Bachelor's degree.  

I was hired to a general medical surgical floor as a new grad.  After 9 months, a training position in the ER opened up and I applied. I got the job because I worked hard and my manager gave me a good recommendation for a transfer.

I worked in that ER as a staff nurse for 2.5 years, then left and took some travel assignments as an ER nurse in other states. After this, I had accrued about 5 years total nursing experience.

I missed my original (and current) ER and I saw they had an opening for a Charge Nurse on day shift.  Coming from swing shift, I saw this as an opportunity to normalize my life and become a supervisor of sorts.  I was graciously offered the position.  I was young for the job, true, but I went into the interview confident with my skills in both nursing and interviewing.

I now have over 3 years of Charge Nurse experience and over 8 total years nursing experience. I interviewed for a Director of Emergency Department job and was denied, lacking education and experience.  I interviewed for a House (on-duty) Administrator position and was denied, but I think that was a mistake, since it's really just a glorified charge nurse job, IMO. I believe I will get the job when the next opening is available, but it is a rotating nights/days administration job and there is no overtime, so even though it's a major promotion as far as responsibility is concerned, I could potentially make less money.

Male nurses have no significant advantage in the field, IMO. I think men are more likely to go into specialty nursing because they WANT IT. They simply won't settle for less. Really it's education, confidence, and interviewing skills make the difference. Men are not in 'higher demand' because they are men, employers really just want motivated, educated, dedicated employees.  I'm not saying women are anything to the contrary, in fact, most upper level nursing administrators are female, I just think male nurses put themselves out there more and that can make their entry level jobs better by willing it so.

As far as your nurse practitioner comment - they DO NOT make 75% of a doctor's salary in the real world. In fact, if they make 50% that is AMAZING.  An NP in primary care will barely hit 100k in most cities, where an MD will easily clear 200$. Plus, there are very few NPs that are in the truly high paying specialties such as neurosurgery or radiology (none there, really) or cardiovascular thoracic surgery.  The NPs I know in neurosurgery and CVT surgery are workhorses for the docs, doing lots of post op rounds to check wounds and dressings. They also have to carry malpractice insurance if they practice alone, which is another reason most work for a group of doctors or some big 'McMedicine' company (like Minute Clinic at CVS) that tells them what to do.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:27:22 AM EDT
[#30]
I prefer "Murse" thank you. hahaha Nursing is a fantastic field to get into because there are so many things that you can do, it is very versatile, and with experience you can get a job anywhere! The problem is first getting a job since the job market is very rough for new grads right now. Getting into nursing school is very difficult and you need damn near perfect grades to even be considered for any program. So if you need to take prerequisites get A's and nothing less.

I am a Cardiac/Transplant ICU Registered Nurse at a top 20 Academic Medical Center. Let me tell you I freaking love my job! Being an ICU nurse is so great for me because It is physical, challenging, fulfilling, has good job security, good pay, good benefits, beautiful women everywhere, 3 days of work a week (12 hour shifts), but it is massively stressful. Sometimes after working a few days in a row, it takes me a whole day to recover from the mental and physical beat down that I had received. Every few months I need to take a week of just to recharge and get my shit back together. If you are going back to school for nursing, make sure that you get your Bachelors at the very least. Most big hospitals will only consider a Bachelors prepared nurse unless you have a lot of experience as an Associates prepared nurse.

For the love of all that is holy do not go straight to your Master's. You WILL have such a hard time grasping concepts and putting it into practice. A lot of nursing is making tough judgment calls in very stressful situations. Many times Residents will ask me what I think we should do when a patient's condition is deteriorating. If you go straight for your Master's you will not have the experience necessary to make the tough calls that you need to make. The inability to make those calls could cause some very serious harm to a patient, and could possibly even lead to death.

Btw whoever told you that NPs get 75% the pay of an MD and none of the liability is stretching the truth quite a bit. It depends what kind of nurse practitioner you are, where you work, the experience you have, and how in demand you are. It also depends on what kind of MD you are and at what level you are practicing. Are you referring to an MD as the Internist, hospitalist, resident, fellow, or as the attending? Everyone, I repeat, EVERYONE in direct patient care is liable for their actions. It is also because of this fact that you should get experience as a floor nurse before pursuing your masters.

The most important thing about going into nursing is that you cannot do it for the money, although the money is very good. Your heart has to be in the right place, if not, you will start to despise your job which leads to you hating it. There is nothing that makes a more dangerous nurse than one that hates their job. I will be honest, there is no room for that in this profession. This is just the way that I feel. If you have any personal questions or need any help don't be afraid to e-mail me: [email protected].
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:31:59 AM EDT
[#31]



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.




And puke, and piss, and shit.




Much of that depends on what kind of nursing you do.


Depends on the facility. I've worked places where inpatient care RNs do it all most of the time. Didn't matter what unit. Looks like that will be getting more common place too thanks to impending changes in reimbursement and costs.

 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:42:00 AM EDT
[#32]
Quoted:
My career trajectory has not been unusual as a male nurse with a Bachelor's degree.  

I was hired to a general medical surgical floor as a new grad.  After 9 months, a training position in the ER opened up and I applied. I got the job because I worked hard and my manager gave me a good recommendation for a transfer.

I worked in that ER as a staff nurse for 2.5 years, then left and took some travel assignments as an ER nurse in other states. After this, I had accrued about 5 years total nursing experience.

I missed my original (and current) ER and I saw they had an opening for a Charge Nurse on day shift.  Coming from swing shift, I saw this as an opportunity to normalize my life and become a supervisor of sorts.  I was graciously offered the position.  I was young for the job, true, but I went into the interview confident with my skills in both nursing and interviewing.

I now have over 3 years of Charge Nurse experience and over 8 total years nursing experience. I interviewed for a Director of Emergency Department job and was denied, lacking education and experience.  I interviewed for a House (on-duty) Administrator position and was denied, but I think that was a mistake, since it's really just a glorified charge nurse job, IMO. I believe I will get the job when the next opening is available, but it is a rotating nights/days administration job and there is no overtime, so even though it's a major promotion as far as responsibility is concerned, I could potentially make less money.

Male nurses have no significant advantage in the field, IMO. I think men are more likely to go into specialty nursing because they WANT IT. They simply won't settle for less. Really it's education, confidence, and interviewing skills make the difference. Men are not in 'higher demand' because they are men, employers really just want motivated, educated, dedicated employees.  I'm not saying women are anything to the contrary, in fact, most upper level nursing administrators are female, I just think male nurses put themselves out there more and that can make their entry level jobs better by willing it so.

As far as your nurse practitioner comment - they DO NOT make 75% of a doctor's salary in the real world. In fact, if they make 50% that is AMAZING.  An NP in primary care will barely hit 100k in most cities, where an MD will easily clear 200$. Plus, there are very few NPs that are in the truly high paying specialties such as neurosurgery or radiology (none there, really) or cardiovascular thoracic surgery.  The NPs I know in neurosurgery and CVT surgery are workhorses for the docs, doing lots of post op rounds to check wounds and dressings. They also have to carry malpractice insurance if they practice alone, which is another reason most work for a group of doctors or some big 'McMedicine' company (like Minute Clinic at CVS) that tells them what to do.


I work primarily with the Cardiac/Vascular/Thoracic NPs and the Transplant NPs. They get absolutely shit on. They get run into the ground and have so much on their palate that they barely have time to sit down to think. From the minute they get in to the minute they get out, it is a whirlwind of craziness. I think this is just the nature of the beast on a fast paced high case-load surgical division. Another reason why you cannot do it for the money. Here is the thing about MDs pay. Unless you are an Attending or a Specialist, you are severely underpaid for the amount of hours you work. For the amount of hours that our Cardic/Thoracic fellows work (80 hours a week), they end up getting like $12-$14/hour before taxes which is a horrifying prospect due to the severity and importance of their job. Anything less than an Attending or Specialist and it is more of a sacrifice and giving back to Medicine and Healthcare. I do have a cousin who just became an Attending Anesthesiologist (one of the highest paid in Medicine due to medical malpractice) and he is starting around $300K.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:53:06 AM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.


And puke, and piss, and shit.


Vomit, piss, blood, spit, phlegm, stomach juice, bile, sooooo many different kinds of shit (c. difficile, melena, tube feed, steatorrhea, etc.), it is not for individuals with weak stomachs. Just today right before I got off of my shift, my patient had a mountain of dark bloody stool that got everywhere, and I MEAN EVERYWHERE!!!! He was so embarrassed and absolutely mortified, but I reassured him that he had a big surgery (kidney/pancreas transplant) and having a big bowel movement like that was a huge milestone in his plan of care and it truly is. Because of that I was able to take out his nasogastric tube, I could feed him, and this severely decreases the change that the patient would form a paralytic ileus which is a whole other can of worms we never want our post-op patients to open up. I cleaned him up, did it with a smile on my face, and reassured him that he was doing great and we were probably going to send him to the floor later on today. Its just part of the job!
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:53:07 AM EDT
[#34]
Quoted:
I know a guy who was a male nurse for years. He always had some sort of administrative position and made around $70k working regular daylight hours.
Seems like a pretty good gig.

My one grandfather was a male nurse in the Korean War. He's never talked about it and I always thought it was weird growing up that he was a guy nurse in the military


Speed


ha thats me right now....but Im really wanting back in the OR....only so much admin a nurse can take.   Flexability is the best part of the job.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 9:55:22 AM EDT
[#35]



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.




And puke, and piss, and shit.




Vomit, piss, blood, spit, phlegm, stomach juice, bile, sooooo many different kinds of shit (c. difficile, melena, tube feed, steatorrhea, etc.), it is not for individuals with weak stomachs. Just today right before I got off of my shift, my patient had a mountain of dark bloody stool that got everywhere, and I MEAN EVERYWHERE!!!! He was so embarrassed and absolutely mortified, but I reassured him that he had a big surgery (kidney/pancreas transplant) and having a big bowel movement like that was a huge milestone in his plan of care and it truly is. Because of that I was able to take out his nasogastric tube, I could feed him, and this severely decreases the change that the patient would form a paralytic ileus which is a whole other can of worms we never want our post-op patients to open up. I cleaned him up, did it with a smile on my face, and reassured him that he was doing great and we were probably going to send him to the floor later on today. Its just part of the job!


This is why you are the man!
 
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:06:55 AM EDT
[#36]
My Pop recently retired after working 30+ years as a Psychiatric RN.  It's a good living.  Although, I recall every once in a while he would come home with a new bruise he picked up while trying to restraining temperamental patients. Strapping down violent and disturbed mental patients was always the Male RN's job.

My sister currently works as an ER Nurse in Houston.  She loves it.  They recruited her from NY and promised a VERY nice signing bonus if she would move out there.  Nursing is a fine profession in fairly high demand.  If you're male and can stomach the work then go for it. Not sure what all this fuss is about?
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:11:16 AM EDT
[#37]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'd think real hard about what nurses do before I went down that path. You'll become good friends with old vaginas and balls.


And puke, and piss, and shit.


Vomit, piss, blood, spit, phlegm, stomach juice, bile, sooooo many different kinds of shit (c. difficile, melena, tube feed, steatorrhea, etc.), it is not for individuals with weak stomachs. Just today right before I got off of my shift, my patient had a mountain of dark bloody stool that got everywhere, and I MEAN EVERYWHERE!!!! He was so embarrassed and absolutely mortified, but I reassured him that he had a big surgery (kidney/pancreas transplant) and having a big bowel movement like that was a huge milestone in his plan of care and it truly is. Because of that I was able to take out his nasogastric tube, I could feed him, and this severely decreases the change that the patient would form a paralytic ileus which is a whole other can of worms we never want our post-op patients to open up. I cleaned him up, did it with a smile on my face, and reassured him that he was doing great and we were probably going to send him to the floor later on today. Its just part of the job!



If you choose to do those things you can as an RN.

I am a male RN and I work in the QA department.

This morning I represented the company in front of an Administrative Law Judge.

Then I went to one of our offices and conducted an unannouced fire drill.

Then I picked up several boxes of old paper records and put them in our storage vault.

And now I am eating a little Chinese and surfing before checking my emails and going home.

There are hundreds of career paths in nursing.

Prior to this I worked in the OR and PACU.

So I have had very little bodily fluids contact in my career.

Being a male RN is pretty much like the rest of life.  It is what you make it.

Or you can make excuses why you never amounted to much, whether you choose to become an RN or not.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:13:39 AM EDT
[#38]
Brother is a LPN.  Makes good money.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:16:01 AM EDT
[#39]
I'm an ED RN and I like it just fine.  Working 3 days a week is nice.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:18:25 AM EDT
[#40]
Quoted:
Quoted:

My wife doesn't think I have the temperment


Just because you'd tase the shit out of someone to make them take their meds?


I'm known more for my direct style of communication as opposed to my compassioniate side.

It might not go over well if I tell someone to stop their sniveling and to man up.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 10:20:22 AM EDT
[#41]
I would.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 11:02:49 AM EDT
[#42]
31 years. Never had sex  with a corpse. It does pay the bills.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 11:11:30 AM EDT
[#43]
Quoted:
Another thread (the male nurse humping a corpse thread) had a few guys bring up being male and being a nurse.  I figured I'd not bomb that thread and instead start another: Just curious if there are any guys in here that would consider going in to nursing, etc.

My wife graduated from nursing school 2 years ago and got in to management right away (thanks to a different degree), and she maintains that a man can get through nursing school easier and find a job easier than a woman simply because the demand is that much higher.  Of the 30-some people in her class 5 of them were men and all 5 of them had "up 1 level" nursing jobs (non floor nurse, or "specialty" nurse positions) even before they graduated college.  None of these guys are floor nurses and all of them made better wages simply because they were male.  I do not know all the specifics and neither does she, but even her instructors were telling the entire class that male nurses get to pick and choose where they want to go.  

I believe I would give it a go if I had to start all over again.  I think.  I'd almost consider going all the way up and getting my Masters in order to be a Nurse Practitioner. %75 the pay of an MD and none of the liability BS, or so I am told.


I'm currently in a different career/education track in college. However, if I could not find employment in my current area of expertise, I would not have a problem going back to school with the intent of going into the medical field (EMT, Nurse, etc.) in the future...I see no problem with acquiring the knowledge to heal the human body and to help others in life.

ETA: Many of the "male" medical personnel who have interacted with me during emergency situations were former military combat medics.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 12:42:23 PM EDT
[#44]
Quoted:
Another thread (the male nurse humping a corpse thread) had a few guys bring up being male and being a nurse.  I figured I'd not bomb that thread and instead start another: Just curious if there are any guys in here that would consider going in to nursing, etc.

My wife graduated from nursing school 2 years ago and got in to management right away (thanks to a different degree), and she maintains that a man can get through nursing school easier and find a job easier than a woman simply because the demand is that much higher.  Of the 30-some people in her class 5 of them were men and all 5 of them had "up 1 level" nursing jobs (non floor nurse, or "specialty" nurse positions) even before they graduated college.  None of these guys are floor nurses and all of them made better wages simply because they were male.  I do not know all the specifics and neither does she, but even her instructors were telling the entire class that male nurses get to pick and choose where they want to go.  

I believe I would give it a go if I had to start all over again.  I think.  I'd almost consider going all the way up and getting my Masters in order to be a Nurse Practitioner. %75 the pay of an MD and none of the liability BS, or so I am told.


My brother is a nurse. He started out in a large Minneapolis hospital. He got a job literally right out of college at one of the largest, most prestigious hospitals in Minnesota.

He has since gotten his Nurse Practitioner's certification (Or whatever it is) and makes big money. He can pretty much write his own ticket and go anywhere he wants.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 12:46:56 PM EDT
[#45]
If there is a demand for male nurses, and not many male nurses to fill the positions, then male nurses will have a relatively easy time finding a good job. Seems pretty straight forward to me.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 12:50:57 PM EDT
[#46]
Quoted:
I can assure you that you don't get more pay for being a male. You just get to jack up your back worse lifting fatties and then get the combative patients




Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 12:58:42 PM EDT
[#47]
Quoted:
Another thread (the male nurse humping a corpse thread) had a few guys bring up being male and being a nurse.  I figured I'd not bomb that thread and instead start another: Just curious if there are any guys in here that would consider going in to nursing, etc.

My wife graduated from nursing school 2 years ago and got in to management right away (thanks to a different degree), and she maintains that a man can get through nursing school easier and find a job easier than a woman simply because the demand is that much higher.  Of the 30-some people in her class 5 of them were men and all 5 of them had "up 1 level" nursing jobs (non floor nurse, or "specialty" nurse positions) even before they graduated college.  None of these guys are floor nurses and all of them made better wages simply because they were male.  I do not know all the specifics and neither does she, but even her instructors were telling the entire class that male nurses get to pick and choose where they want to go.  

I believe I would give it a go if I had to start all over again.  I think.  I'd almost consider going all the way up and getting my Masters in order to be a Nurse Practitioner. %75 the pay of an MD and none of the liability BS, or so I am told.


It's not any different than females being in demand to fill quotas in other jobs.  Works both ways .....

Link Posted: 1/22/2013 1:37:37 PM EDT
[#48]
I graduate this spring from a 4 year BSN program. I got into nursing because I wanted to have a job that matters and because there is no limit to where you can take your career as a nurse. If you get bored of one specialty, you can easily move to another. If you want a management position, you can take one. If you decide you want to move to the other side of the country, you know you can find a job. And the money and hours are pretty decent also.

Downsides are dealing with bodily fluids (eh, you get used to it), having patients die (and the real possibility that a mistake you made may have been the cause), and the fact that healthcare workers are assaulted on a much higher rate than the general population. Even as a nurse aid, I've been punched, kicked, bitten, headbutted, choked, and pinched. Don't think that nurses have a cake job. And yes, as a male, they will give you the aggressive patients.
Link Posted: 1/22/2013 2:19:10 PM EDT
[#49]
get your business degree run your own business they said
took a few classes at a college with a nursing program and by the sheer mass of nurses they had attending I said
pfftt they wont be finding jobs....
now as a sit here with technology making me pretty much obsolete within 5 to 10 years
I kick myself for not taking the nurse route.... job security
sister in law is a nurse who figured out being a educated nurse is how its done

I forgot what exactly but pretty much she went from gross hands on stuff to a nice desk job
recently certified doing something obscure... only one in the area so for now she is in high demand
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