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Posted: 4/4/2020 6:14:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/5/2020 8:37:26 AM EST by Emt1581]
* Yeast bought, now looking for something to filter the cider with to get all the yeast/non-cider particles out afterward.*


I want to get some yeast to make hard cider and maybe wine if I get daring enough.  Only ever bought it at the local supply place.  Is it fine to order from anywhere online or does it need to be refrigerated the entire time so packaging/shipping method matters?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:20:43 PM EST
I've ordered Lalvin from Amazon with no problems.  Mostly EC-1118, or D47.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:22:59 PM EST
The dry stuff is fine to be shipped any which way, the liquid stuff need to be shipped cold (on ice).
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:27:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
The dry stuff is fine to be shipped any which way, the liquid stuff need to be shipped cold (on ice).
View Quote


Good to know, but the local shop keeps all of them in the fridge so I figured that's how they (packets) needed to be stored cold.  

How long can they be kept at room temp?  Months, years....decades?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:36:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/4/2020 6:37:47 PM EST by AZ_Sky]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


Good to know, but the local shop keeps all of them in the fridge so I figured that's how they (packets) needed to be stored cold.  

How long can they be kept at room temp?  Months, years....decades?

Thanks!
View Quote
I would guess a year or two for unopened dry yeast and half a year for liquid yeast refrigerated.
High temps are what kill yeast, if you plan on long term storing dry yeast I would still refrigerate it.
I order my beer and wine yeast just before I need it trusting that I get the freshest possible.
I have ordered liquid yeast before during the summer and while it showed up Fedex overnight in a cool pack and worked fine, I was a bit worried.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:39:58 PM EST
Dry yeast (Beer or wine) is still best kept in the fridge to preserve cell counts but it's quite hardy. It will typically have an expiration date printed on it.  The danger in buying from Amazon is commingled supply with expired or poorly stored product. Lots of good brew shops online or on eBay with good prices that will ship in date yeast.

(Expired dry yeast can be okay deepening on how far out and the storage conditions may need a starter. Liquid cultures don't last too long beyond their stamped dates)
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:47:22 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rook85:
Dry yeast (Beer or wine) is still best kept in the fridge to preserve cell counts but it's quite hardy. It will typically have an expiration date printed on it.  The danger in buying from Amazon is commingled supply with expired or poorly stored product. Lots of good brew shops online or on eBay with good prices that will ship in date yeast.

(Expired dry yeast can be okay deepening on how far out and the storage conditions may need a starter. Liquid cultures don't last too long beyond their stamped dates)
View Quote


Any particular ebay sellers you recommend?  

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:48:47 PM EST
Order from a solid home brew retailer like Northern Brewer or Midwest Supplies. Get some Lalvin EC-1118
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:50:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TrainSafe:
Order from a solid home brew retailer like Northern Brewer or Midwest Supplies. Get some Lalvin EC-1118
View Quote
Yep, those are the two that I use.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 6:54:51 PM EST
I use Austin homebrew.  Dry champagne yeast.  Good stuff, up to 14% ABV.  Lots of uses. Dry yeast ships fine. Just bought myself some more.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 7:39:31 PM EST
No local homebrew stores here so I order online.  Midwest and Northern Brewer are good but I mostly order from here: Adventures in Homebrewing

Due to shipping times I always use dry yeast.  In fact, I just ordered several packs yesterday.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 8:52:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/4/2020 8:53:04 PM EST by AlvinYork]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
I would guess a year or two for unopened dry yeast and half a year for liquid yeast refrigerated.
High temps are what kill yeast, if you plan on long term storing dry yeast I would still refrigerate it.
I order my beer and wine yeast just before I need it trusting that I get the freshest possible.
I have ordered liquid yeast before during the summer and while it showed up Fedex overnight in a cool pack and worked fine, I was a bit worried.
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Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


Good to know, but the local shop keeps all of them in the fridge so I figured that's how they (packets) needed to be stored cold.  

How long can they be kept at room temp?  Months, years....decades?

Thanks!
I would guess a year or two for unopened dry yeast and half a year for liquid yeast refrigerated.
High temps are what kill yeast, if you plan on long term storing dry yeast I would still refrigerate it.
I order my beer and wine yeast just before I need it trusting that I get the freshest possible.
I have ordered liquid yeast before during the summer and while it showed up Fedex overnight in a cool pack and worked fine, I was a bit worried.

Worked in a wine maker supply shop while I was in college. We'd turn the stocks of the dry stuff over, run a sale on it in under two years. If it didn't sell the owner would let me have it. Plenty a batch of cider was made with a packet of champagne yeast that was two years old or older. I personally wouldn't buy it but I sure made a ton of wine out of it for free.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 8:58:53 PM EST
Champagne yeast won't give you the best cider. Try Nottingham, us05, s04.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:35:28 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By amaixner:
Champagne yeast won't give you the best cider. Try Nottingham, us05, s04.
View Quote


Nottingham is actually what I used to use now that I see it.  Why is it so much more expensive than the other stuff?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:45:52 PM EST
It'll still work fine if you order it.

I've used EC-1118 that was so old that I was sure it wouldn't work. It worked fine. I've also used fairly old Red Star and Fleischmann's.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:49:10 PM EST
I get mine from Amazon
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:52:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/4/2020 9:53:08 PM EST by HTHF]
Side note, bread yeast was out everywhere including Amzon, and people on ebay were charging insane prices for it. I hope we won't be there, but get your beer brewing/wine making yeast now before the poors start buying any yeast they can get their hands on.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:53:58 PM EST
The dry stuff is fine over the mail, given the time of year particularly.

go for it.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:55:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brundoggie:
No local homebrew stores here so I order online.  Midwest and Northern Brewer are good but I mostly order from here: Adventures in Homebrewing

Due to shipping times I always use dry yeast.  In fact, I just ordered several packs yesterday.
View Quote
If you get the blister packs, they ship with ice packs anyways.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:55:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


Good to know, but the local shop keeps all of them in the fridge so I figured that's how they (packets) needed to be stored cold.  

How long can they be kept at room temp?  Months, years....decades?

Thanks!
View Quote



Is your local shop open at all? Mine will deliver/ship if the order is big enough. I'd bet yours would too if you place a larger order.
Link Posted: 4/4/2020 9:56:27 PM EST
ebay
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 2:09:44 AM EST
No need to buy anything; just dunk your unwashed balls in the mash before you go to ferment
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 8:28:23 AM EST
I ended up buying a packet of Nottingham which should last for a few gallons.  And then I ordered 6 packets of Cote Des Blancs to keep in the fridge for longer term throughout the year.  Now all I need to do is stock up on apple juice and we'll be good to go.  

Last time I made cider I ended up with little pieces floating around the bottle/glass and that was after filtering it twice through coffee filters.  Is there something more purpose-built that will get all of that out better that's maybe reusable?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 8:34:19 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
I ended up buying a packet of Nottingham which should last for a few gallons.  And then I ordered 6 packets of Cote Des Blancs to keep in the fridge for longer term throughout the year.  Now all I need to do is stock up on apple juice and we'll be good to go.  

Last time I made cider I ended up with little pieces floating around the bottle/glass and that was after filtering it twice through coffee filters.  Is there something more purpose-built that will get all of that out better that's maybe reusable?

Thanks!
View Quote

Yes, there are home filtration pumps. We use one very effectively on fruit wines.
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 8:36:08 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LeadBreakfast:

Yes, there are home filtration pumps. We use one very effectively on fruit wines.
View Quote


Home filtration pump?  So that's what I should search for on google or ebay?  I was thinking more along the lines of a piece of material I could pour through but I'm not opposed to spending a few extra bucks on a pump if it means nothing floating around my bottle.  

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 10:38:19 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


Home filtration pump?  So that's what I should search for on google or ebay?  I was thinking more along the lines of a piece of material I could pour through but I'm not opposed to spending a few extra bucks on a pump if it means nothing floating around my bottle.  

Thanks!
View Quote

Filtering can run the gamut of inexpensive to very expensive depending how much you want to spend vs how much you plan on filtering.
There are gravity fed systems, air powered systems, electric pumps, etc.
One of the least expensive is the Harris gravity fed filter.

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Failed To Load Product Data



The Vinbrite Filter Kit for Wines and Spirits - assembly and operation

Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:09:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:

Filtering can run the gamut of inexpensive to very expensive depending how much you want to spend vs how much you plan on filtering.
There are gravity fed systems, air powered systems, electric pumps, etc.
One of the least expensive is the Harris gravity fed filter.

www.amazon.com/dp/B004NXSPLG

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0rnNjYNFxc
View Quote


That Vinbrite kit looks do-able.  I only make a gallon at a time.  So that should work nicely.  However, are the pads re-usable?  At $4-$5 per pad it doubles the cost of my gallon.  

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:13:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kpoesq369:
I've ordered Lalvin from Amazon with no problems.  Mostly EC-1118, or D47.
View Quote
These......
If you go with 25+% sugar...its near 18%.
Just sayin..
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:13:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By amaixner:
Champagne yeast won't give you the best cider. Try Nottingham, us05, s04.
View Quote

My favorite is Mangrove Jack M02 cider yeast.
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:22:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


That Vinbrite kit looks do-able.  I only make a gallon at a time.  So that should work nicely.  However, are the pads re-usable?  At $4-$5 per pad it doubles the cost of my gallon.  

Thanks!
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Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:

Filtering can run the gamut of inexpensive to very expensive depending how much you want to spend vs how much you plan on filtering.
There are gravity fed systems, air powered systems, electric pumps, etc.
One of the least expensive is the Harris gravity fed filter.

www.amazon.com/dp/B004NXSPLG

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0rnNjYNFxc


That Vinbrite kit looks do-able.  I only make a gallon at a time.  So that should work nicely.  However, are the pads re-usable?  At $4-$5 per pad it doubles the cost of my gallon.  

Thanks!
No they aren't.
They can get clogged very easily if you have a lot of sediment.
Think of them like coffee filters, you don't reuse them.
Plus all kinds of nasty things will start growing in them even if you can save them without destroying them.
And no matter whose filter you use (on the low end filter market) the pads will have to be replaced.
It's just the cost of 'doing business'.
It's up to you to decide if the cost is worth the clarity (maybe for cider that you serve your guests only).
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:23:52 PM EST
Much easier than filtration is to just do a fining step and cold crash.

The easiest way is to do it with gelatin but they also make some fining agents just for the purpose.

Cold crashing just means leave it in a refrigerator without touching it and let gravity drop out the particles. Then when you are ready to move it to the next container you just take everything but the layer of garbage on the bottom.
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:28:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By logos:
Much easier than filtration is to just do a fining step and cold crash.

The easiest way is to do it with gelatin but they also make some fining agents just for the purpose.

Cold crashing just means leave it in a refrigerator without touching it and let gravity drop out the particles. Then when you are ready to move it to the next container you just take everything but the layer of garbage on the bottom.
View Quote


I've tried this by not letting the siphon touch the bottom 1", 2", etc. ...didn't matter.  Still got a ton of sediment transferring.  It wasn't cloudy but you could see a bunch of shit swimming around if you looked.

Thanks though.
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:31:25 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
No they aren't.
They can get clogged very easily if you have a lot of sediment.
Think of them like coffee filters, you don't reuse them.
Plus all kinds of nasty things will start growing in them even if you can save them without destroying them.
And no matter whose filter you use (on the low end filter market) the pads will have to be replaced.
It's just the cost of 'doing business'.
It's up to you to decide if the cost is worth the clarity (maybe for cider that you serve your guests only).
View Quote


I see they might be cheaper than I originally saw.  Around .50 is what I'm seeing.  But there's several different "filters" and I'm not sure which I need.... Filter Papers, Crystalbrite, Prime-Pad (pre-treatment), Filtabrite.  Thoughts?

All I need is something to filter out sediment when transferring from the jug I'm fermenting in to the one I want to store it in.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:36:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/5/2020 7:37:07 PM EST by KELBEAST]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mooreshawnm:
ebay
View Quote


Red star premier champagne blanc is all over EBay.

You can get 5 packs for like $7

Champ yeast will finish SUPER dry though. Might want something else
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:40:16 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kpoesq369:
I've ordered Lalvin from Amazon with no problems.  Mostly EC-1118, or D47.
View Quote



EC-1118 is really good.  I even made bread with it last weekend. It takes longer for the bread to rise, but other than that it worked perfect.
Link Posted: 4/5/2020 7:50:33 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


I see they might be cheaper than I originally saw.  Around .50 is what I'm seeing.  But there's several different "filters" and I'm not sure which I need.... Filter Papers, Crystalbrite, Prime-Pad (pre-treatment), Filtabrite.  Thoughts?

All I need is something to filter out sediment when transferring from the jug I'm fermenting in to the one I want to store it in.

Thanks!
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Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
No they aren't.
They can get clogged very easily if you have a lot of sediment.
Think of them like coffee filters, you don't reuse them.
Plus all kinds of nasty things will start growing in them even if you can save them without destroying them.
And no matter whose filter you use (on the low end filter market) the pads will have to be replaced.
It's just the cost of 'doing business'.
It's up to you to decide if the cost is worth the clarity (maybe for cider that you serve your guests only).


I see they might be cheaper than I originally saw.  Around .50 is what I'm seeing.  But there's several different "filters" and I'm not sure which I need.... Filter Papers, Crystalbrite, Prime-Pad (pre-treatment), Filtabrite.  Thoughts?

All I need is something to filter out sediment when transferring from the jug I'm fermenting in to the one I want to store it in.

Thanks!
I can't really answer that since I don't know how much your cider needs filtering or clear you really want it.
The difference between the filters is how small of particles they filter (which also affects how quickly they will clog).
I believe that the kit comes with three different filter pad types that you can try and maybe get an idea of which one works best.
I would start with the coarsest filter and see if that much filtering is enough, if it is then go with that one as it will last the longest before clogging - if you want more filtering then work your way down in filtering size.

From
http://www.harrisfilters.com/wine-filtration/

Attachment Attached File


Link Posted: 4/5/2020 9:34:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KELBEAST:


Red star premier champagne blanc is all over EBay.

You can get 5 packs for like $7

Champ yeast will finish SUPER dry though. Might want something else
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Originally Posted By KELBEAST:
Originally Posted By mooreshawnm:
ebay


Red star premier champagne blanc is all over EBay.

You can get 5 packs for like $7

Champ yeast will finish SUPER dry though. Might want something else

It burns out a lot of the apple flavor, too.
Link Posted: 4/7/2020 7:39:00 AM EST
You probably want Red Star Premier Classique for something like EdWort's apfelwein (or recipe for 1 gal of cider), but if you want something a little different this recipe for Apple Cyser recommends Lalvin 71B.

I've tried the regular apfelwein recipe before (in both the 5 gallon carboys as well as in smaller 1 gallon jugs) but I've never tried apple cyser. He says it's higher ABV and I think it sounds good.
Link Posted: 4/7/2020 2:18:39 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lowbrow:
You probably want Red Star Premier Classique for something like EdWort's apfelwein (or recipe for 1 gal of cider), but if you want something a little different this recipe for Apple Cyser recommends Lalvin 71B.

I've tried the regular apfelwein recipe before (in both the 5 gallon carboys as well as in smaller 1 gallon jugs) but I've never tried apple cyser. He says it's higher ABV and I think it sounds good.
View Quote


I'm familiar with the Nottingham and I'll try the Red Star Cote Des Blancs to see what the flavor difference is like.  But I can branch out into others if yeast is going to make that distinct of a difference in the flavor, ABV, etc.  

Right now my focus is on finding a cheap but effective filtering system because the Vinbrite isn't available for a reasonable price that I could see.  Everyone is out of stock, hasn't sold it in a while, or it's ~$35 but then the shipping is $50-$100 to float it over her from the UK.  

Thanks
Link Posted: 4/7/2020 2:28:38 PM EST
Why do you want to filter it so badly?
Link Posted: 4/7/2020 2:33:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Why do you want to filter it so badly?
View Quote


Biggest reason is because my wife refuses to drink it with the sediment floating around.  Plus I'd like to be able to serve it to guests without it looking as cloudy.  

Link Posted: 4/8/2020 11:05:01 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:


I'm familiar with the Nottingham and I'll try the Red Star Cote Des Blancs to see what the flavor difference is like.  But I can branch out into others if yeast is going to make that distinct of a difference in the flavor, ABV, etc.  

Right now my focus is on finding a cheap but effective filtering system because the Vinbrite isn't available for a reasonable price that I could see.  Everyone is out of stock, hasn't sold it in a while, or it's ~$35 but then the shipping is $50-$100 to float it over her from the UK.  

Thanks
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Originally Posted By Lowbrow:
You probably want Red Star Premier Classique for something like EdWort's apfelwein (or recipe for 1 gal of cider), but if you want something a little different this recipe for Apple Cyser recommends Lalvin 71B.

I've tried the regular apfelwein recipe before (in both the 5 gallon carboys as well as in smaller 1 gallon jugs) but I've never tried apple cyser. He says it's higher ABV and I think it sounds good.


I'm familiar with the Nottingham and I'll try the Red Star Cote Des Blancs to see what the flavor difference is like.  But I can branch out into others if yeast is going to make that distinct of a difference in the flavor, ABV, etc.  

Right now my focus is on finding a cheap but effective filtering system because the Vinbrite isn't available for a reasonable price that I could see.  Everyone is out of stock, hasn't sold it in a while, or it's ~$35 but then the shipping is $50-$100 to float it over her from the UK.  

Thanks

Trying to find an inexpensive yet effective way to filter wine/beer can be a tough chore - pump and or gas pressure filters are the best but they are probably way more than you want to spend.
Here is another gravity fed option (KLR filter).
https://www.southernhomebrew.com/vinbritefilter.html
Link Posted: 4/8/2020 8:33:30 PM EST
The Nottingham arrived today.  I'm totally wiped from a 12-14hour day so I'm not able to sterilize the jug and set everything up tonight but definitely some time this week I'll get to it.  

Still on the hunt for a good filtration option, and thanks for the recent suggestion on the 2nd option.  

Just curious for those in the cider game....how much sugar do you usually pour in?  To be honest, I've never measured I just pour a bunch in.  I do have a hydrometer so I guess I can see what more/less sugar does to both taste and ABV.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 4/8/2020 8:43:26 PM EST
FYI

Do not use a filter to get rid of floaters and stuff you can see in wine.  Filters are only to polish a clear wine to very clear.

Filters have really little openings, they clog up and become useless very quickly.

If you are really serious about wine, buy an All in One wine pump.  Best money you will spend on wine equipment.
Link Posted: 4/8/2020 10:16:33 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
The Nottingham arrived today.  I'm totally wiped from a 12-14hour day so I'm not able to sterilize the jug and set everything up tonight but definitely some time this week I'll get to it.  

Still on the hunt for a good filtration option, and thanks for the recent suggestion on the 2nd option.  

Just curious for those in the cider game....how much sugar do you usually pour in?  To be honest, I've never measured I just pour a bunch in.  I do have a hydrometer so I guess I can see what more/less sugar does to both taste and ABV.

Thanks!
View Quote

The best cider I’ve made had no added sugar.
Link Posted: 4/8/2020 10:17:57 PM EST
Go to the source

Scottlab.com
Link Posted: 4/9/2020 10:48:04 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:

The best cider I’ve made had no added sugar.
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Flavor-wise what made it the best?
Link Posted: 4/9/2020 3:39:13 PM EST
Got a new batch started today with the Nottingham.  Not sure what to make of it but numbers around the hydrometer read 8, 14, and 60.  Not sure what they mean but that's the pre-fermentation reading.  We'll see what it reads after the batch is done.  

How long do you usually let cider go for until you notice the bubbles stop in the air lock?  Filled my air lock with a shot of Titos.
Link Posted: 4/9/2020 3:48:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/9/2020 3:52:23 PM EST by AZ_Sky]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Got a new batch started today with the Nottingham.  Not sure what to make of it but numbers around the hydrometer read 8, 14, and 60.  Not sure what they mean but that's the pre-fermentation reading.  We'll see what it reads after the batch is done.  

How long do you usually let cider go for until you notice the bubbles stop in the air lock?  Filled my air lock with a shot of Titos.
View Quote

Are you using a triple scale hydrometer?
The three scales are Balling, Specific Gravity, and Potential Alcohol.
That reminds me, I need to order a new hydrometer - the last time I brewed I dropped mine and broke it...

How to use a Hydrometer - using the Potential Alcohol Scale

Link Posted: 4/9/2020 4:02:31 PM EST
Unless you're in a hurry, I'd skip any of the filters and just let gravity do it's thing.

I have a cider I started last August that got racked into secondary around day 10, and didn't get touched until Thanksgiving since so much stuff was settling out of it - but that was a dirty cider started from crabapples.  

With apple juice, your product should clear on it's own in about a month.  If you're in a hurry, you can use bentonite or sparkaloid to really pull the sediment down in a hurry and have something drinkable in about 2 weeks from start to finish.
Link Posted: 4/9/2020 4:09:29 PM EST
A wine pump filter is probably overkill for an amateur occasionally making fruit wine. OP should read up on clarifying wine with "finings" of bentonite, isinglass, or other suitable products. It's not hard to do and only requires patience.

Any home brew store should have all of those in stock along with dry yeast for you.

If you are not having luck online try my buddies at how do you brew. If you don't see what you need or want online call and talk to them.

how do you brew ?
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