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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/23/2006 7:09:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 7:10:28 AM EDT by ggllggll]
www.closeout.com/we-jet321373.html

JET 9x20



I can get it for 1100 down the road here and was wondering if this is an all around good starter lathe?

I want to be able to turn barrels down and do threading.

When a lathe is 20" distance between centers can you work on a 20 inch piece or is the working area different from the center distance?

Second question, can you thread a 20" barrel with this lathe?

-thanks!
Matt
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:13:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 7:15:30 AM EDT by gaspain]

Originally Posted By ggllggll:


Second question, can you thread a 20" barrel with this lathe?

-thanks!
Matt



You "might" be able to do a 14"-16" barrel, as long as you have a pass though. I dont think a 20 is gonna fit.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:22:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 7:29:33 AM EDT by Soylent]
You should be able to thread the barrel, you'd just chuck up further on the barrel and not run between centers.
That being said, JET equipment can have some rigidity issues. They aren't going to be able to do any real heavy, and perhaps even moderately heavy cutting. If you get it, go to the local steel yard and ask if you can go through their rem pile. Rems are usually free and you can bring them home and test out what works and what doesn't.

*ETA*
If you haven't already, make sure to buy a high quality test indicator. I recommend Brown & Sharpe's BesTest indicators. Buy the attachments, mag bases, etc. for it also.
Also buy a 1" travel indicator and mag base.
These items are absolutely necessary for lather work if you want to be precise. There are of course more tools you should have, micrometer, caliper, etc. but the indicators are essential. A start up set of indicators and attachments will likely run around the $200.00 - $300.00 range. You can buy off brand stuff for considerably less, but you get what you pay for.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:25:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 7:34:17 AM EDT by gaspain]
To turn a barrel for threading you should set it up like this



or this:




so, it looks lik you need a longer table or get one with a pass though chuck.(a chuck with a hole in the center)
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:25:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 7:27:27 AM EDT by jchewie]
There are two ways to set up rifle barrels for chambering or threading.
Use a steady rest and work way out on the lathe (probably needs a 40 inch bed)
or mount the barrel so it is held at the chuck and also at the back of the spindle.

I'm not a machinist, but am familiar enough with the process of chambering and cutting threads that I would mount the barrel through the spindle. That means the spindle must be large enough for the barrel, and from their specifications:

Hole Through Spindle (In.) 25/32

so you can fit 3/4 inch stock through the sdpindle. Methinks that is on the small side.

For that price I would look for a quality used lathe if you have the space.

Head over to here for lots more ideas.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:27:05 AM EDT
First, $1100 seems a bit steep for that lathe unless it includes the stand. Harbor Freight has the same lathe for $799, and you can sometimes find it on sale for as low as $599 9x20 lathe.

The Harbor Freight is the exact same lathe with different color paint. Also the same as the Grizzly. They are all made at the same factory in China.

It's not a bad lathe for some small projects, but it's not built strong enough to do any real machining. It will need some modifications to make it more usable than the way it arrives. I suggest Steve Bedair's website for info on the mods. Steve Bedair's 9x20 lathe page

You can thread a barrel with the lathe if you're careful and have done some of the mods, including a DC motor with a speed control. It would also depend on the diameter of the barrel. To thread a barrel safely, you would have to put the barrel through the spindle hole on the headstock. The factory hole is too small for many barrels, but you can ream it out safely to about 13/16" (0.8125"). This is about the limit of barrel diameter that you could handle with that machine. You cannot put a barrel in between centers and expect to thread it properly.

Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:26:29 AM EDT
Glad I didnt buy it.

Thanks for the information everyone, I guess I'll just have to keep my eyes open for something better.

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:29:19 AM EDT
What about this guy?

1920 to the front door...

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=33274
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:39:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ggllggll:
What about this guy?

1920 to the front door...

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=33274



na, I have a Harbor Frieght Mill/Lathe. I cant recommend the China made equipment to anyone. They simply are not very good and it will show in the product you are machining.

Dont buy Harbor Frieght/Jet or Grizzly...because they are all the same brand, just different paint.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:41:59 AM EDT


this is getting expensive
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:45:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 9:51:35 AM EDT by vsound]
The HF, Jet, Grizzly is okay for hobby projects, but I agree with Gaspain that it is not the machine to use for critical work. I did thread a rifle barrel on the HF, and it came out okay, but I had to do it very carefully.

If you can save up the money, I would recommend looking at a Smithy. They are supposed to be pretty good quality, but you will pay a good bit more for it. Smithy CZ-239

Otherwise, I would recommend looking for a deal on Ebay or another online site on a used South Bend, Atlas, or similar.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:26:27 PM EDT
Like several others have said, you need to think bigger. I tend to think that 36 inches between centers is adequate, but I've only done a couple of BPCR barrels which were 30-32 inches long. If you're not going to need to work that length of barrel, you can get by with less.

You should be aware that the current "hot" set up is to have a large headstock hole so that you can work with the majority of the barrel thru the hole. This allows you to use a shorter bed lathe and many people will claim that any other method isn't to be considered . That's a bunch of snobby crap.

Do a web search for John Hinnant. He wrote and sells a book "The Complete Illustrated Guide to Precision Rifle Barrel Fitting" He covers the two most common methods of threading barrels, "Between centers" and "Thru the headstock". Either way works if you pay proper attention to details, and won't work if you don't.

Check out Homegunsmith.com, lots of help is available there if you need it.

Don in Ohio
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:34:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ggllggll:


this is getting expensive



For machining anything beyond a pistol-barrel sized piece, it is. Look into a used lathe perhaps. 12x36 or so, maybe larger. Really depends on your long term interests, after all.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:37:46 PM EDT
You want a 1.5" hole threw the spindle at least. and a 40" bed.. nothing smaller...
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 4:35:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ProfessorEvil:

Originally Posted By ggllggll:


this is getting expensive



For machining anything beyond a pistol-barrel sized piece, it is. Look into a used lathe perhaps. 12x36 or so, maybe larger. Really depends on your long term interests, after all.



Check your local used equipment dealers, check for local machine shops liquidating stuff, scrounge, bargain and get a good deal. My workplace sold a 14x50 sized lathe with a bunch of tooling for $400 6 months ago. Had I known it was going for that cheap I would have bought it.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 5:17:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vsound:
The HF, Jet, Grizzly is okay for hobby projects, but I agree with Gaspain that it is not the machine to use for critical work. I did thread a rifle barrel on the HF, and it came out okay, but I had to do it very carefully.

If you can save up the money, I would recommend looking at a Smithy. They are supposed to be pretty good quality, but you will pay a good bit more for it. Smithy CZ-239

Otherwise, I would recommend looking for a deal on Ebay or another online site on a used South Bend, Atlas, or similar.



+1 on the South Bend. What an excellent lathe. I've used Atlas before too but those old South Bends are just a beautiful piece of equipment as long as it hasn't been abused.

You might also look around for an older Hardinge lathe. They make collet chucking lathes and of all the samll manuals out there, they are sort of the cadillac model. Couple years back there were several being sold off as they were replaced by small CNC turning centers or the work went to china in my area. Check around for them.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 5:27:43 AM EDT
Let me add the older Logans to the list. There are still new parts available.

SRM
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