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Posted: 1/6/2012 9:18:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 9:21:12 AM EDT by NoahFN]
My daughter is 8 months old and has been fighting a series of ear infections. We were referred to, and got some recommendations for an ear, nose and throat specialist and scheduled an appointment for Thursday next week.

My daugther has been in obvious pain the last 2 days and we are trying to move the appointment up. In order to do that we have to see a different doctor who is a D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) rather than an M.D.

From what I've read they appear to have most of the same training. Can anyone give me specifics as to what the difference is and should I expect anything different when seeing a D.O. rather than an M.D. I'm a little concerned, but mostly because I've never seen, or even heard of a D.O. before.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:19:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/6/2012 9:21:57 AM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:21:24 AM EDT
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:25:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:30:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
DOs go into all subspecialities

I know an ER Doctor, OB/Gyn and Rheumatolgist who are DOs, although I doubt their patients know that without specifically asking.
I guess I have seen a few ER guys and OB/Gyns that were D.O., but all the plastic surgeons, oncologists, ENTs and orthopedists I've had dealings with were M.D. Just my experience.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:36:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
DOs go into all subspecialities

I know an ER Doctor, OB/Gyn and Rheumatolgist who are DOs, although I doubt their patients know that without specifically asking.
I guess I have seen a few ER guys and OB/Gyns that were D.O., but all the plastic surgeons, oncologists, ENTs and orthopedists I've had dealings with were M.D. Just my experience.



The doctor we are seeing is an ENT who is a D.O.

I'm guessing that she will end up getting tubes in her ears, which is scary but will hopefully work out for the best.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:39:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
DOs go into all subspecialities

I know an ER Doctor, OB/Gyn and Rheumatolgist who are DOs, although I doubt their patients know that without specifically asking.
I guess I have seen a few ER guys and OB/Gyns that were D.O., but all the plastic surgeons, oncologists, ENTs and orthopedists I've had dealings with were M.D. Just my experience.



I have worked with DOs who are neurologists.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:41:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NoahFN:
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
DOs go into all subspecialities

I know an ER Doctor, OB/Gyn and Rheumatolgist who are DOs, although I doubt their patients know that without specifically asking.
I guess I have seen a few ER guys and OB/Gyns that were D.O., but all the plastic surgeons, oncologists, ENTs and orthopedists I've had dealings with were M.D. Just my experience.



The doctor we are seeing is an ENT who is a D.O.

I'm guessing that she will end up getting tubes in her ears, which is scary but will hopefully work out for the best.





I feel for her I used to get them when I was in the Navy to
the point they would put tears in my eyes from the pain.

From my understanding the tubes are no big deal.

As I understand it they make a small incision in the eardrum
and put in what looks like a rubber grommet (though very tiny).

In time they fall out


Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:43:28 AM EDT
No difference worth worrying about.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:54:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Aimless:
Practical difference in a pediatrician, probably 0.

Osteopathic medicine training is basically identical to a standard MD except osteopathic training has some "manipulation training", like massages to ease head congestion I think. In my experience most osteopaths in subspecialities (ie not general practice doctors) don't do any osteopathic manipulations.


And they also did their residencies in their specialties alongside, and in the same manner as, MDs.

I've always viewed osteopathic medicine somewhat skeptically, but I agree that in practice it doesn't seem to matter much.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 9:55:32 AM EDT
No real difference. Sometimes, it's tougher for a newly-minted DO to get into the "Tier 1" residency programs, but that's it. Very few DO's practice OMT (manipulation).

I know plenty of great cardiologists who are D.O.'s who are better doctors than Ivy League M.D.'s.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 10:08:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NoahFN:
Originally Posted By DzlBenz:

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
For general practice doctors, I prefer going to a D.O., because, in my experience, they tend to seek to treat the ailment, not just relieve the symptoms. For speacilists, I would imagine that they're almost all going to be M.D.s.
DOs go into all subspecialities

I know an ER Doctor, OB/Gyn and Rheumatolgist who are DOs, although I doubt their patients know that without specifically asking.
I guess I have seen a few ER guys and OB/Gyns that were D.O., but all the plastic surgeons, oncologists, ENTs and orthopedists I've had dealings with were M.D. Just my experience.



The doctor we are seeing is an ENT who is a D.O.

I'm guessing that she will end up getting tubes in her ears, which is scary but will hopefully work out for the best.



My son who just turned 8 just got his 3rd set of tubes in Dec. He should have been grown out by now, but he isn't. The tubes keep him a lot healthier and are worth it. The actual procedure is about 10 minutes. They do put them under general anesthesia though.
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