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Posted: 12/31/2002 7:06:52 AM EST
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56389-2002Dec30.html By Matthew Mosk Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, December 31, 2002; Page A01 [b]The nation's first state law requiring all new handguns to be outfitted with built-in trigger locks will take effect in Maryland tomorrow[/b], a measure gun control advocates predict will save lives but one that has gun dealers fearing for their livelihoods. [b]Only six models of handguns and integrated trigger locks now on the market would meet the law's standards, and manufacturers of other models have started cutting back their distribution in Maryland, several dealers said yesterday.[/b] Sanford Abrams, of the Maryland Licensed Firearms Dealers Association, said limiting the sales options to such a small array of models will be painful, and he offered a gloomy forecast for the dealers' long-term survival. "It will have a disastrous effect," he said. "Companies are not and will not be compliant. There will be hundreds of models that will no longer be available." The dealers are hoping that legal action or the party change in the Maryland governor's office will help blunt the impact of the provision. And a spokeswoman for Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R) yesterday repeated Ehrlich's campaign pledge to "take a fresh look at this law, as well as all laws surrounding the sale of guns." But dealers were not optimistic that such efforts would prove meaningful. "Short of seeing the General Assembly pass a new law, I don't see a lot of hope for intervening," Abrams said. The gun control advocates who aggressively lobbied to see the measure put in place said they are not overly concerned about gun dealers' potential hardships. "How do you balance saving the life of a child against the prospects that sales might decrease somewhat?" asked Sen. Brian E. Frosh (D-Montgomery), one of the chief sponsors of the measure. "To me, when you look at the balance, it comes out heavily on the side of saving lives." The trigger-lock provision was part of a raft of gun control measures the Maryland General Assembly passed in 2000 despite bitter opposition from the rural reaches of the state and the National Rifle Association, which enlisted its 50,000 Maryland members to phone lawmakers just before key votes. Passage came on the strength of support from Gov. Parris N. Glendening (D) and from legislators in the state's larger, more liberal-leaning counties, and it prompted President Bill Clinton to make his first and only trip to a state capital to attend a bill signing. At the time, Clinton called the law a model for how government can help eliminate accidents that can occur when children play with guns. It will do so, advocates said, by limiting the sale of handguns to those with an integrated locking system that can limit the use of the weapon to people who hold the key or know the combination. "This will save lives," said Matt Fenton, president of Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse Inc. "It's the way of the future." Lillian Pubillones Nolan, the Montgomery County chapter director of the Million Mom March, said the law will help protect Maryland's children. "Tragically, we have too many instances where children wind up victims in an accident because guns are left unattended," Nolan said. "If this means saving lives, I think responsible gun owners should see it as a minor inconvenience." But gun enthusiasts remain doubtful about the potential benefits. "The problem with this is, you're trying to make the object safer instead of the individuals who handle it," said Richard Berglund, president of the Maryland Arms Collectors Association. In the meantime, store owners worry that the law could lead to serious financial problems. "In the short run, it might increase business, as people buy the last of the new guns" manufactured before the Jan. 1 deadline, said Steve Schneider, who owns Atlantic Guns of Silver Spring. "But in the long run, it's a scary prospect." Schneider said he believes that it is unlikely that gunmakers will take steps to remodel their weapons just to comply with the laws of one small Mid-Atlantic state. He compared it to asking automakers to build cars with the steering wheel on the right-hand side just for sales in Maryland. "I hope they will do it," Schneider said. "But you have to wonder how much they feel the need to suit Maryland's whims." Already, there are rumblings that some in the industry plan to sue the state to test the validity of the law. Carl Roy, owner of Maryland Small Arms, an indoor shooting range and weapons distributor in Upper Marlboro, said he is banking on the chance that such a lawsuit will lead to a temporary restraining order, halting enforcement of the law. "I believe it's a restraint of trade," Roy said. "It's basically going to ban new guns in the state. We've already had a number of distributors saying they won't ship guns into the state." Frosh noted that the final version of the measure was a compromise with gun enthusiasts. The measure mandated the locks, created mandatory sentences for gun crimes, required ballistic "fingerprinting" of shell casings from new guns and required those wishing to purchase a handgun to complete two hours of safety training. But Glendening agreed to eliminate provisions that would have required even more advanced high-tech locks, such as those that would unlock only if sensors in the grip recognize the owner's fingerprints. [/b]Gov. James E. McGreevey (D) made New Jersey the first state to require the "smart gun" technology this month.[/b] But that law won't take effect until three years after the state's attorney general determines that the technology is sound. © 2002 The Washington Post Company ------------------------------------------------- Attention: NJ and MD Liberals, and any other antigun liberals PLEASE DONT MOVE TO KALI PLEASE DONT MOVE TO KALI PLEASE DONT MOVE TO KALI PLEASE DONT ...ERR STOP MOVING TO KALI PLEASE STOP MOVING TO KALI PLEASE STOP MOVING TO KALI at least Kali has over 800 handguns that can be sold here
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 7:20:29 AM EST
[>(] My poor homestate is worse than Kalifornistan. [:(] Dunno if I can go back now...was kinda planning on it. But on the bright side I'm in VA which is much friendlier to my (gun) rights.
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 7:43:10 AM EST
"How do you balance saving the life of a child against the prospects that sales might decrease somewhat?" asked Sen. Brian E. Frosh (D-Montgomery), one of the chief sponsors of the measure. "To me, when you look at the balance, it comes out heavily on the side of saving lives."
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How many children supposedly die for lack of trigger locks in that state? Less than a handful. Though a child's death, from any cause, is tragic, these instances are probably more likely attributed to the parent. But punishing the masses makes more sense, right? It's a de-facto ban, and that jackass knows it. It won't save lives.
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 7:46:08 AM EST
Yes it's worse:
[b]The nation's first state law requiring all new handguns to be outfitted with built-in trigger locks will take effect in Maryland tomorrow[/b], [red]a measure gun control advocates predict will save lives[/red]
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And when it doesn't, what will their reaction be? WE NEED [i]TOUGHER[/i] GUN CONTROL LAWS! Isn't it always?
Sanford Abrams, of the Maryland Licensed Firearms Dealers Association, said limiting the sales options to such a small array of models will be painful, and he offered a gloomy forecast for the dealers' long-term survival. "It will have a disastrous effect," he said. "Companies are not and will not be compliant. There will be hundreds of models that will no longer be available."
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But it [b]won't stop illegal importation of guns,[/b] will it?
(D)ealers were not optimistic that such efforts would prove meaningful. "Short of seeing the General Assembly pass a new law, I don't see a lot of hope for intervening," Abrams said.
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Fat fvcking chance.
The gun control advocates who aggressively lobbied to see the measure put in place said they are not overly concerned about gun dealers' potential hardships.
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Of course not. Gun dealers are just merchants of death who want to see children laying dead in the street. Ask any liberal. Besides, they're all evil business owners who oppress their employees.
"How do you balance saving [red]the life of a child[/red] against the prospects that sales might decrease somewhat?" asked Sen. Brian E. Frosh (D-Montgomery), one of the chief sponsors of the measure. "To me, when you look at the balance, it comes out heavily on the side of saving lives."
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This is why politicians are afraid of the .50 caliber rifle's capability of penetrating armored limousines.
The trigger-lock provision was part of a raft of gun control measures the Maryland General Assembly passed in 2000 despite bitter opposition from the rural reaches of the state and the National Rifle Association, which enlisted its 50,000 Maryland members to phone lawmakers just before key votes.
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To no avail.
At the time, Clinton called the law [red]a model for how government can help eliminate accidents that can occur when children play with guns.[/red]
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IOW - "This is a model for FEDERAL legislation"
It will do so, advocates said, by limiting the sale of handguns to those with an integrated locking system that can limit the use of the weapon to people who hold the key or know the combination.
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While not affecting the 70 million OTHER handguns already in circulation. Yet.
[red]"This will save lives,"[/red] said Matt Fenton, president of Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse Inc.
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It will also [i]cost[/i] some.
"It's the way of the future."
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Not in my state. Not if I have anything to say about it.
Lillian Pubillones Nolan, the Montgomery County chapter director of the Million Mom March, said the law will help protect Maryland's [red]children.[/red] "Tragically, we have too many instances where children wind up victims in an accident because guns are left unattended," Nolan said. "If this means saving lives, I think responsible gun owners should see it as a minor inconvenience."
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Yes, if you can't get your firearm to fire when someone breaks into your home, it's only a "minor inconvenience."
But gun enthusiasts remain doubtful about the potential benefits.
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No sh!t! Tell me another!
"The problem with this is, you're trying to make the object safer instead of the individuals who handle it," said Richard Berglund, president of the Maryland Arms Collectors Association. In the meantime, store owners worry that the law could lead to serious financial problems. "In the short run, it might increase business, as people buy the last of the new guns" manufactured before the Jan. 1 deadline, said Steve Schneider, who owns Atlantic Guns of Silver Spring. "But in the long run, it's a scary prospect."
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Because the bad guys will still be getting theirs out of state or by theft from the pool of guns not so equipped. And everybody knows it. And if someone is irresponsible enough to leave a firearm out where a child can access it, what makes anybody think they'll be responsible enough to engage the locking device?
Schneider said he believes that it is unlikely that gunmakers will take steps to remodel their weapons just to comply with the laws of one small Mid-Atlantic state. He compared it to asking automakers to build cars with the steering wheel on the right-hand side just for sales in Maryland.
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But Maryland wants to be for guns what California is to automobiles, regardless of its size. In actuality this is just another step in Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran's [url=www.oag.state.md.us/Press/guns.pdf]plan to remove handguns from the state entirely.[/url] It appears to be proceding nicely.
Already, there are rumblings that some in the industry plan to sue the state to test the validity of the law.
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I wish them good luck.
Carl Roy, owner of Maryland Small Arms, an indoor shooting range and weapons distributor in Upper Marlboro, said he is banking on the chance that such a lawsuit will lead to a temporary restraining order, halting enforcement of the law. "I believe it's a restraint of trade," Roy said. "It's basically going to ban new guns in the state. We've already had a number of distributors saying they won't ship guns into the state." Frosh noted that the final version of the measure [red]was a compromise with gun enthusiasts.[/red]
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Which is why my motto has become "This far, no further." I won't [i]compromise[/i] any longer. "Compromise" now means only giving up [i]half[/i] of what [i]they[/i] want. I've had enough.
The measure mandated the locks, created mandatory sentences for gun crimes, required ballistic "fingerprinting" of shell casings from new guns and required those wishing to purchase a handgun to complete two hours of safety training. But Glendening agreed to eliminate provisions that would have required even more advanced high-tech locks, such as those that would unlock only if sensors in the grip recognize the owner's fingerprints. [/b]Gov. James E. McGreevey (D) made New Jersey the first state to require the "smart gun" technology this month.[/b] But that law won't take effect until three years after the state's attorney general determines that the technology is sound.
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And I'm sure Curran would have determined that the technology worked NOW. [pissed]
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 8:02:52 AM EST
What the f%ck is wrong with those moronic asswipes???? Things are bad here in MA. Trigger locks are mandated, but they don't have to be built into the gun. This means you get an extra $6.00 lock when you buy a gun, but that isn't so bad as the nonsense in MD.
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 12:53:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 1:01:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By Troy: The solution to this would be for ALL gun manufacturers to stop selling handguns in Maryland. And I mean ALL handguns, INCLUDING police and government sales, until this law is repealed. But, just like gun owners, gun manufacturers are too divided, and some company (Ruger... [rolleyes]) would make sales anyway. -Troy
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I think you are absolutely right. If the manufacturers would prohibit sales to the police and govt in states who pass such stupid laws, you might see some change.
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 1:06:28 PM EST
I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] I am a Maryland resident [stick] [pissed][pissed][pissed][pissed][pissed][piss­ed][pissed][pissed][pissed][pissed][pissed][p­issed] I am a Maryland resident who will stay and fight their BS!
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 1:11:12 PM EST
And what this article doesn't mention is that AR's SAR's and other semi-auto rifles are processed and treated just like handguns in MD. Therefore all of those are banned as well. I'm glad I got my Glock last week ahead of this BS. Probably after the 1st Handgun prices are going to almost double. Time for MD'ers to make a march on Annapolis...LOL yeah right!
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 1:57:51 PM EST
Glocks are too dangerous to sell to Mass residents, and until recently, SIGs and Beretta's were all deemed too "unsafe", and couldn't be sold after Oct. 1998. SIG and Beretta made changes at their own expense after a couple years, to sell in Mass again (second hidden serial number, and a chamber loaded indicator, which in the case of the SIG is just a divot in the barrel showing the brass) Glock still hasn't caved, and is probably to expensive to modify, so they won't sell any guns mfgd. after Oct 98 in Mass anymore. At least we can still have 30 round hi-caps, AK's, and AR's, I just wish Boston would sink into the sea.
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 2:03:28 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 5:52:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/31/2002 5:53:12 PM EST by Pthfndr]
Sounds like all you MD residents should move to a FREE[b](ER)[/b] state. Cali perhaps [:D]
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 6:05:00 PM EST
SIG and Beretta made changes at their own expense after a couple years, to sell in Mass again (second hidden serial number, and a chamber loaded indicator
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Didn't Berettas already have chamber loaded indicator on their handguns? 1st of all, leaving a loaded unsecured handgun accessible to children is the parents fault. Why not impose stricter penalties on them?
Link Posted: 12/31/2002 6:05:49 PM EST
CT is probably middle of the road. ARs and hicaps are OK but AKs are not. Every other year there is more gun-control BS that we have to fight. The noose is tightening.
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