Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 9/2/2004 6:24:22 AM EST
I see lots of talk about reliability of trucks on this forum and elsewhere. People obviously feel strongly enough to put 'piss on Ford' or 'piss on Chevy' stickers on their trucks. If your brand is so reliable why don't we see old 1988 F350s pulling big horse trailers around? I see lots of 2000 and newer models of all brands, but I never see an older one actually still working every week - except mine.

Is it the truck that can't walk the walk, or is it the brainwashed owner - convinced by Detroit that he must have something new?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:26:08 AM EST
Im curious to know what "older" trucks are the most reliable ..... quailty of car makers change and flip-flop as time goes by.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:41:51 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:45:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By skid2964:
Im curious to know what "older" trucks are the most reliable ..... quailty of car makers change and flip-flop as time goes by.




Mine is an F350 4-door, dually, 7.3 Navistar with a Banks turbo. It pulls a 7,000 lb horse trailer every weekend. During the week it is personal transportation and odd jobs. Last week it hauled hay. Last month it pulled that 7,000 lb trailer on a 1,700 mile trip. Does anyone actually own a truck like this that is still doing work? It doesn't count if you've just 'heard about a guy once' that had one.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:47:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 6:48:21 AM EST by BeetleBailey]
I've got a 1999 Silverado LS, 5.3L that is a POS.

ABS system and passenger-side window have already gone out.
The accelerator sticks on occasion.
And the bedrails keep rusting out.

I'm so glad they hold their value so well, for whatever reason. Not quite into negative equity yet.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:49:21 AM EST
Another major component is basic styling. A 1988 F350 is a square box compared to the newer models. Some people may like the older style over the new and vice versa. I have seen that in many rural areas that the average truck is a little older.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:49:50 AM EST
I like my 1997 Chevrolet pick up..........no problems ever

and the most important part is that I own it not the bank
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:51:39 AM EST
There are a number of older trucks (differing makes and models) out there pulling their weight just fine. Most people I would suspect just want something new.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:55:58 AM EST
Hmmm, well let me take a gander at this one.

Yup, just like the last time i checked, Ford's 1980's model trucks couldn't pull our 15,000 lbs of cattle, or our 13,000 pound skid steer (weight with trailer).

Oh ya, why would any normal citizen want 600 ft. lbs of torque anyway?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:16:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:
Hmmm, well let me take a gander at this one.

Yup, just like the last time i checked, Ford's 1980's model trucks couldn't pull our 15,000 lbs of cattle, or our 13,000 pound skid steer (weight with trailer).

Oh ya, why would any normal citizen want 600 ft. lbs of torque anyway?



Who said we had to be normal to want that
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:18:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By Sammich:

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:
Hmmm, well let me take a gander at this one.

Yup, just like the last time i checked, Ford's 1980's model trucks couldn't pull our 15,000 lbs of cattle, or our 13,000 pound skid steer (weight with trailer).

Oh ya, why would any normal citizen want 600 ft. lbs of torque anyway?



Who said we had to be normal to want that



Completely agree.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:26:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 7:27:23 AM EST by Crimson_Trace]

Originally Posted By toysarforus:
If your brand is so reliable why don't we see old 1988 F350s pulling big horse trailers around?



The reason is very simple and has NOTHING to do with the quality of the truck.

If a person can afford horses and a big horse trailer, that person can afford a new truck.


These things came with 460 motor, Dana 60 and Corporate 10.25 inch axles, B-W t-case, c6 or T-19 tranny. This running gear is at least as robust as the stuff coming on the current trucks. Tell me...where is the weak link?

-Z
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:37:46 AM EST
Sometimes it all comes down to luck w/ a truck.
Last week I sold my 86 Chevy 1/2ton....318,000 + miles.
And picked up a 2004 1/2 w/ the extended cab.
Give me at least 10 years to say if the quality is any better today.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:51:01 AM EST
It may be in your mind as you likely see the early '80s as the recent past as opposed to 20 years ago. I have a 1994 GMC K1500. I don't consider it that old, but the reality is that it is a decade old. Usage is cumulative, and 10 years is a lot. However, you probably don't consider 1994 to be old.

I suspect you think that pre '80 is old, but I've got bad news for you. 1990 was 14 years ago.

When you remove the folks from the pool that 'just gotta have a new truck', replacement ends up being a financial decision. At some point all vehicles will turn into a money pit. When a vehicle ends up costing you significant dollars and still ends up unreliable, the decision is made to unload it.

Additionally, the longer a vehicle is on the road, the more raw exposure to accidents it has as well.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 7:53:36 AM EST
1970's vehicles:

- very low power due to smog crap but no electronics

- poor quality

- poor ride

- few creature comforts
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 8:47:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
It may be in your mind as you likely see the early '80s as the recent past as opposed to 20 years ago. I have a 1994 GMC K1500. I don't consider it that old, but the reality is that it is a decade old. Usage is cumulative, and 10 years is a lot. However, you probably don't consider 1994 to be old.

I suspect you think that pre '80 is old, but I've got bad news for you. 1990 was 14 years ago.

When you remove the folks from the pool that 'just gotta have a new truck', replacement ends up being a financial decision. At some point all vehicles will turn into a money pit. When a vehicle ends up costing you significant dollars and still ends up unreliable, the decision is made to unload it.

Additionally, the longer a vehicle is on the road, the more raw exposure to accidents it has as well.



You made some good points. I am trying to figure out if I've just been very lucky with my '88 F350 or if almost no one else tries an older vehicle because it's socially unacceptable or what. It is a difficult situation for me because this truck runs so well, and looks good too - I think. It has almost no rust. However, we can afford a new truck, therefore my wife keeps wanting a new truck. Virtually all my friends say get a new one. To a man, they all have new ones. If they have an old 2001 or 2002, they are planning a trade real soon. They tell me their's is getting unreliable or things are starting to break. I really don't get it. In the last several years, we've spent almost nothing on broken stuff, just new batteries (it takes two) and oil changes.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 8:53:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 8:54:23 AM EST by Cincinnatus]

Originally Posted By toysarforus:
I see lots of talk about reliability of trucks on this forum and elsewhere. People obviously feel strongly enough to put 'piss on Ford' or 'piss on Chevy' stickers on their trucks. If your brand is so reliable why don't we see old 1988 F350s pulling big horse trailers around? I see lots of 2000 and newer models of all brands, but I never see an older one actually still working every week - except mine.

Is it the truck that can't walk the walk, or is it the brainwashed owner - convinced by Detroit that he must have something new?



Ford Owners are simply higher quality, higher class individuals than chevy or dodge buyers.
We tend to be very successful, hence our desire to constantly purchase newer, more expensive vehicles.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:02:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By toysarforus:

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:
It may be in your mind as you likely see the early '80s as the recent past as opposed to 20 years ago. I have a 1994 GMC K1500. I don't consider it that old, but the reality is that it is a decade old. Usage is cumulative, and 10 years is a lot. However, you probably don't consider 1994 to be old.

I suspect you think that pre '80 is old, but I've got bad news for you. 1990 was 14 years ago.

When you remove the folks from the pool that 'just gotta have a new truck', replacement ends up being a financial decision. At some point all vehicles will turn into a money pit. When a vehicle ends up costing you significant dollars and still ends up unreliable, the decision is made to unload it.

Additionally, the longer a vehicle is on the road, the more raw exposure to accidents it has as well.



You made some good points. I am trying to figure out if I've just been very lucky with my '88 F350 or if almost no one else tries an older vehicle because it's socially unacceptable or what. It is a difficult situation for me because this truck runs so well, and looks good too - I think. It has almost no rust. However, we can afford a new truck, therefore my wife keeps wanting a new truck. Virtually all my friends say get a new one. To a man, they all have new ones. If they have an old 2001 or 2002, they are planning a trade real soon. They tell me their's is getting unreliable or things are starting to break. I really don't get it. In the last several years, we've spent almost nothing on broken stuff, just new batteries (it takes two) and oil changes.



The decision is yours... Is your truck a luxury, a status symbol, or a purpose built vehicle?

Another thing to keep in mind is that NOBODY used to buy anything beyond half ton unless it was required by the load. Today, people do it just for the hell of it. I'd love to see some sales stats over the past decade.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:11:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 10:13:17 AM EST by Tanker06]
I just donated my `86 F-150 to 'Purple Heart', as I now commute about triple the distance that I did
when it was my 'commute to work vehicle.' At 158K, it was still cruising right along w/o any problems.

The only 'problem' was that it had a V8 and going to and from work was putting a hurt on the wallet,
gas $$ wise.

I used it for a bit of everything, not just a 'go to work' vehicle, so it definitely earned it's keep, and
not just a 'look what I have' type of thing.

I'll probably be getting another sometime next year.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:20:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 10:21:04 AM EST by wildearp]

Originally Posted By toysarforus:
I see lots of talk about reliability of trucks on this forum and elsewhere. People obviously feel strongly enough to put 'piss on Ford' or 'piss on Chevy' stickers on their trucks. If your brand is so reliable why don't we see old 1988 F350s pulling big horse trailers around? I see lots of 2000 and newer models of all brands, but I never see an older one actually still working every week - except mine.

Is it the truck that can't walk the walk, or is it the brainwashed owner - convinced by Detroit that he must have something new?



My 1978 Chevy crew cab regularly pulls over 10000 pounds through the mountains. Many 90's poser trucks would shit a transmission a day doing that.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:35:16 AM EST
I just gave my mom my 97 F-150, which was my do WTF ever I wanted truck. Except to play in the mud as it was 2WD. I drove it to work everyday, hauled stuff in it, moved from an apartment to a house with it, towed my Mach 1 200 miles with it @70mph, pulled stuck vehicles out with it etc. The only reason I got rid of it was because I have another child on the way and needed more than 2 seats. Now I have an 01 F-150 SuperCrew 4WD (because I wanted 4WD) that I hope/plan on having for a long long time. I could afford a better/newer vehicle, but why? It's not a status symbol but is nice, has enough creature comforts, fits the whole family, can tow, can haul small and medium sized objects (miss the full sized bed), and what not.
Top Top