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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/23/2006 6:16:29 PM EDT
Got the ammo, just need the rifle.

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:17:56 PM EDT
got mine on reserve....... should have it in september
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:19:10 PM EDT
wow i got some ammo for it too
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:19:37 PM EDT
I'll buy one when they sell the real thing.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:24:25 PM EDT
[tony montana] First you get the ammo. Then you get the rifle. Then, when you got the ammo and rifle...then you get the gay dude off your sofa. [/tony montana]

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:25:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Yankee1911:
[tony montana] First you get the ammo. Then you get the rifle. Then, when you got the ammo and rifle...then you get the gay dude off your sofa. [/tony montana]




Haha, I kicked his ass out soon as back home in the morning.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:26:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By www-glock19-com:
wow i got some ammo for it too



But I have THE ammo for it. Swiss GP90. Only the best ammo for the best gun.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:30:03 PM EDT
according to wikipedia, the GP90 doesn't tumble on impact (so i'm assuming that it therefore wouldn't fragment either?)

might not be a very good terminal performer.

although i'm sure it's VERY accurate.


Other bullets in use by militaries are quite back heavy, due to a long, sharp point created in an attempt to get the maximum ballistic coefficient (see external ballistics). These bullets will flip over after impact, then settle into a stable, back first orientation before stopping. The Swiss military actually redesigned their 5.56 mm assault rifle bullet to prevent this, to more fully comply with the spirit of the Hague Convention, though according to some sources the present GP90 5.56x45mm Swiss assault rifle ammunition was actually designed as an armor-piercing bullet, because in the 1980s it was perceived that the Soviets and their Warsaw Pact allies were going to issue soft body armor to infantry units on a wide basis, but after the end of the Cold War, the Bofors corporation, having spent a great deal of money on developing the new bullet, changed the sales pitch in order to sell it to the Swiss government.


can anyone verify this from somewhere other than the wikipedia article on terminal ballistics?
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:41:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fossil_fuel:
according to wikipedia, the GP90 doesn't tumble on impact (so i'm assuming that it therefore wouldn't fragment either?)

might not be a very good terminal performer.

although i'm sure it's VERY accurate.


Other bullets in use by militaries are quite back heavy, due to a long, sharp point created in an attempt to get the maximum ballistic coefficient (see external ballistics). These bullets will flip over after impact, then settle into a stable, back first orientation before stopping. The Swiss military actually redesigned their 5.56 mm assault rifle bullet to prevent this, to more fully comply with the spirit of the Hague Convention, though according to some sources the present GP90 5.56x45mm Swiss assault rifle ammunition was actually designed as an armor-piercing bullet, because in the 1980s it was perceived that the Soviets and their Warsaw Pact allies were going to issue soft body armor to infantry units on a wide basis, but after the end of the Cold War, the Bofors corporation, having spent a great deal of money on developing the new bullet, changed the sales pitch in order to sell it to the Swiss government.


can anyone verify this from somewhere other than the wikipedia article on terminal ballistics?



BTAmmo Labs test

Looks like ya dont wanna get tagged with one.....
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:53:50 PM EDT
nope, but i'd rather get shot with this stuff than with M193:


2. As with Experiment #2 the rounds exhibited minimal fragmentation- though slightly more than 55 grain Wolf, probably due to the increased length of the bullet. Also as with Experiment #2 all fragmentation was apparently a result of the "toothpaste" effect- some lead core was squeezed out of the base of the projectiles as they flattened while traveling sideways in tissue. The deposit of most fragments between 8 and 12 inches bears this means of fragmentation out as the round was traveling sideways in gelatin in these areas. Slightly increased fragmentation compared to 55 grain Wolf appears to have occurred primarily during this sideways travel of GP90. The jackets remained intact throughout. Recovered weight of the projectiles minus fragments were 57 and 59 grains- probably quite near the original weight of the projectiles.



conclusions:


GP90 63 grain ammo is resistant to fragmentation at least up to 2811 fps. Swiss GP90 is designed to reduce wounding properties for humanitarian reasons so this was not surprising and is consistent with other results.

GP90 veers as much as 30-45 degrees in tissue after around 6-6.5". 2 of 2 rounds tested exhibited this behavior.

After sectioning it was clear that wound cavity volume throughout is far smaller than with M193 or other fragmenting rounds. Wound cavity volume was similar to Wolf. Interestingly, fractures in the gelatin were more pronounced than with Wolf which otherwise exhibited similar performance. This may be due to the increased weight (despite similar velocity) of the GP90 round v. Wolf.

Because of limited wounding capacity and veering in tissue/gel GP90 is unlikely to provide ideal terminal performance for defensive purposes from 16" weapons and is accordingly not recommended by B&T labs as a defensive round. It is, however, very consistent and accurate- particularly for a military round.

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