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Posted: 4/25/2011 9:20:22 PM EDT
I think that this link may only work for subscribers, so I'll "cut and paste" a little more of the story than usual.


Kings Point plans surveillance network

The 3.3-square-mile North Shore enclave of Kings Point is launching a far-reaching surveillance network that can compare the license plate of every car going into the village against federal and state crime databases such as most-wanted lists, stolen vehicle alerts and suspected terrorist files.

When the project is completed, 44 cameras will monitor 19 entrances into the village in what may be one of the most extensive municipal tracking programs anywhere.

The number of cameras equals about one for every 120 people in the village of 5,305 people. Kings Point, a community of million-dollar homes, sits on the Great Neck peninsula, surrounded on three sides by water.

In 2010, 19 property crimes and one violent crime were reported in the village. The most notable crimes last year were a series of home invasions, starting in November, during which women and girls were menaced.

Mayor Michael Kalnick said the tracking program is necessary to protect residents, but privacy and civil rights groups consider it an overreaching intrusion.

Vigilant Video, the California distributor of the CarDetector system Kings Point is using, said the village will be the first locality to blanket its boundaries with the company's license plate-scanning surveillance equipment.

"It's a very intense level of coverage," said Kevin Stauffer, Vigilant Video's regional sales manager.


Link to full story.



Link Posted: 4/25/2011 9:21:40 PM EDT
If there is a will (and lots of money), there is a way...
Link Posted: 4/25/2011 9:46:30 PM EDT
Quoted:
If there is a will (and lots of money), there is a way...

Plenty of that in Kings Point.

Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:02:55 PM EDT
They do the same thing in Tiburon, CA.  It's on a little peninsula that juts into SF Bay.  There's like 1 or 2 roads in and out.
Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:08:05 PM EDT
Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....

somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....

Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:12:05 PM EDT



Quoted:


Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....

somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....



hell did ya see the article where some HS kids were photoshopping up and printing up plates of their teachers cars

then finding similar cars and hauling ass through speed cameras



 
Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:13:42 PM EDT




Quoted:

They do the same thing in Tiburon, CA. It's on a little peninsula that juts into SF Bay. There's like 1 or 2 roads in and out.




Or the ferry from SF.........
Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:16:16 PM EDT




Quoted:





Quoted:

Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....

somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....



hell did ya see the article where some HS kids were photoshopping up and printing up plates of their teachers cars

then finding similar cars and hauling ass through speed cameras

No but thats a good one......sounds like big trouble but creative........



Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:17:31 PM EDT
How is this different than living in a major city (like Detroit) where every freeway ramp, every exit, every major intersection has cameras hooked to a Automated License Plate Recognition System server?


I've said it a thousand times here, you are never more free than They allow you to believe you are. I warned about Cell Phone and Onstar GPS location tracking being abused and people laughed and told me to loosen my tinfoil. Look where we are now....

The next step will be taxing you on actual mileage. Every car will be mandated to have GPS logging onboard and you will pay at the pump via RFID. There is a reason that the .gov kept an interest in Onstar and it is available now for all cars. Won't be long before it's mandatory. Then they'll sell your driving habits to insurance companies like Apple and Google are selling your travel habits to businesses so they can market more directly to people who drive past their store every day.

It's time for a Constitutional Amenment with regard to privacy in the digital aid, both from the .gov and .biz.
Link Posted: 4/25/2011 10:19:22 PM EDT



Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:

Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....

somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....



hell did ya see the article where some HS kids were photoshopping up and printing up plates of their teachers cars

then finding similar cars and hauling ass through speed cameras

No but thats a good one......sounds like big trouble but creative........





original seems to be gone but heres a blog



http://www.dailytech.com/Students+Use+Speed+Cameras+to+Frame+Innocent+­Drivers+Prank+Teachers/article13749.htm



 
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 1:46:58 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....
somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....

hell did ya see the article where some HS kids were photoshopping up and printing up plates of their teachers cars
then finding similar cars and hauling ass through speed cameras
No but thats a good one......sounds like big trouble but creative........


original seems to be gone but heres a blog

http://www.dailytech.com/Students+Use+Speed+Cameras+to+Frame+Innocent+­Drivers+Prank+Teachers/article13749.htm
 



For every high tech solution, there is a low tech countermeasure.



Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:46:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:53:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:53:15 AM EDT
...Meanwhile in Afghanistan

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:57:18 AM EDT
KP is also a college town.  The United States Merchant Marine Academy is there.  LOTS of traffic associated with students, faculty, and family passing through.  Midshipman shenanigans possibly?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 4:59:05 AM EDT
Quoted:
They do this on the PA Turnpike!  My brother and his family went through a home invasion a few years back and the perps that did it got caught because they were in a stolen car and the state police had one of these license plate readers and it detected the plate as being stolen.  Police officer pulled them over and arested them and it was like 4+ hours later that it was realized that these were the same three that were involved in teh home invasion.

Personally, I think it's great technology.



More safety and DUI checkpoints would produce better results. How often is a car stolen versus someone getting out of a bar with too much to drink?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:07:13 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:12:38 AM EDT
I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:13:12 AM EDT
Quoted:
KP is also a college town.  The United States Merchant Marine Academy is there.  LOTS of traffic associated with students, faculty, and family passing through.  Midshipman shenanigans possibly?


The residents didn't care about us for the most part.

Some of them were cool and would give you a ride if you were just walking.  Some of them were elitist and wanted nothing to do with you.  Some of them would give you odd jobs like cutting their lawn.  Some of them were pissed that you were sleeping with their daughter.   But in general, both sides ignored each other.

Plus, there were only 700 +/- of us at school at any given time, and they only let us out on the weekends.  The ones who weren't on restriction, at least.    
Most people wouldn't even stay local, and those that did just wanted to grab a couple 40s from Super-C and drink them in the Park.  
I'd be surprised if the school was even a blip on the radar to most residents.

But the city of Great Nose, they just write a blank check to the police department and say, "Make sure absolutely nothing ever happens."
And that's exactly what they get.  It's about as boring a place as you can imagine a suburb of NYC to be.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:21:17 AM EDT
Covering your plate with a false or stolen one is one low-tech solution, as is driving around the entrances unless the whole danged community is fenced off.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:21:44 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:27:16 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?


Why?



They sure cried foul when they found out the po-po had the means to scan a cell phone and sensationalized it so the rubes would think it was going to be used a routine traffic stops witouit a warrent. Just saying.

I guess living with a Brit style security net is fine with some.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:27:20 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
How is this different than living in a major city (like Detroit) where every freeway ramp, every exit, every major intersection has cameras hooked to a Automated License Plate Recognition System server?


I've said it a thousand times here, you are never more free than They allow you to believe you are. I warned about Cell Phone and Onstar GPS location tracking being abused and people laughed and told me to loosen my tinfoil. Look where we are now....

The next step will be taxing you on actual mileage. Every car will be mandated to have GPS logging onboard and you will pay at the pump via RFID. There is a reason that the .gov kept an interest in Onstar and it is available now for all cars. Won't be long before it's mandatory. Then they'll sell your driving habits to insurance companies like Apple and Google are selling your travel habits to businesses so they can market more directly to people who drive past their store every day.

It's time for a Constitutional Amenment with regard to privacy in the digital aid, both from the .gov and .biz.



I forget the movie but there was one as the person walked by things different ads would pop up just for that person.



That was Minority Report.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:29:49 AM EDT
Meh - really no different than all those gated and security staffed communities in place like Florida.  This is a bit larger in scope, but same big brother mentality.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:33:29 AM EDT
Quoted:
Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....
somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....


There were no murders, rapes, robberies, or assaults recorded in the last almost 8 years.  3 burglaries, 12 thefts, and 1 auto theft in the last year or so.

Doesn't seem like crime is a big problem there.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:45:42 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
Well I guess the bad guys will be stealing more plates/tags.....
somehow I don't believe the stated objective, stolen vehicles, terrorists and most wanted are the real objective....


There were no murders, rapes, robberies, or assaults recorded in the last almost 8 years.  3 burglaries, 12 thefts, and 1 auto theft in the last year or so.

Doesn't seem like crime is a big problem there.


It's a bunch of rich people in an exclusive community that want it to remain exclusive.  Also, they want all the nearby cities to be jealous of their new toy.

It will probably never work properly, and it'll be turned off a month after it's installed.  But that's not the point.  It's a status symbol.  It's a piece of "look what we can do" tech.


There's nothing here.  It's just rich New Yorkers doing what rich New Yorkers do.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:50:27 AM EDT
NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 5:55:24 AM EDT



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?




Why?







They sure cried foul when they found out the po-po had the means to scan a cell phone and sensationalized it so the rubes would think it was going to be used a routine traffic stops witouit a warrent. Just saying.



I guess living with a Brit style security net is fine with some.
Your tag is in plain view and it takes nothing to run it. You don't need reasonable suspicion

or anything like that to view and check the tags. Nothing to file a complaint about.





 
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 6:06:26 AM EDT
Quoted:
NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)


Since when? I've never seen or heard such a ticket being mailed out in NYC in the 18 years I've been here in LE.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 6:29:25 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?


Why?



They sure cried foul when they found out the po-po had the means to scan a cell phone and sensationalized it so the rubes would think it was going to be used a routine traffic stops witouit a warrent. Just saying.

I guess living with a Brit style security net is fine with some.
Your tag is in plain view and it takes nothing to run it. You don't need reasonable suspicion
or anything like that to view and check the tags. Nothing to file a complaint about.


It's just a means to further de-grade of the expectation of privacy Americans [i]thought[/i] they had. I'm sure the gov. control crowd loves it.

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:01:42 AM EDT
Quoted:
NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)


Ah- there's the rub. It's all about no-risk tax collection. Just dun them without actually having to confront them on the highway. Uh oh- that's going to put a lot of traffic cops out of work....

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:41:22 AM EDT
Wait until these cameras are certified for prosecutions.... It will be like in Europe where wen you make it from point A to point B faster than the speed limit allows, you get a ticket in the mail.

They are trying to get these cameras certified here in Michigan-I've heard them a few times on police frequencies where they used them to assist in chases-there was a case in Ohio a few years ago where a stolen car was picked up with the camera system, a chase ensued and resulted in a fatality of an innocent person unrelated to the chase.

My guess is that these have been paid for by DHS fundsin my area. They started putting them up seriously in 2007 and haven't stopped. You cannot get into or out of Detroit's suburbs on any major street or freeway without being seen. Major roads in the outlying areas in SE MI have them as well-they even have a camera'd intersection way the fuck up in BFE near my property in northern Michigan. One of the companies that installs them is Rauhorn Electric, their website lists them as a DOD contractor... The state sure as hell can't afford all these tall-assed poles and microwave commo.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:43:48 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)

Ah- there's the rub. It's all about no-risk tax collection. Just dun them without actually having to confront them on the highway. Uh oh- that's going to put a lot of traffic cops out of work....

I've only seen the red light cameras here in NYC.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:30:17 PM EDT



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)


Ah- there's the rub. It's all about no-risk tax collection. Just dun them without actually having to confront them on the highway. Uh oh- that's going to put a lot of traffic cops out of work....


I've only seen the red light cameras here in NYC.



what are those portable hunting blind looking things NYPD put up ?



 
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:39:42 PM EDT
A license plate is a government-issued identification device meant to be observable, obvious, easily readable and tied to a car and a registered owner.  No-one has ANY expectation of privacy while driving a car on the public street.



People need to get over their anonymity whining.



By the way - automated license plate reading has been in use for 15 years that I am aware of - I'm sure even longer.  It isn't new.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:04:41 PM EDT
Quoted:
How is this different than living in a major city (like Detroit) where every freeway ramp, every exit, every major intersection has cameras hooked to a Automated License Plate Recognition System server?


I've said it a thousand times here, you are never more free than They allow you to believe you are. I warned about Cell Phone and Onstar GPS location tracking being abused and people laughed and told me to loosen my tinfoil. Look where we are now....

The next step will be taxing you on actual mileage. Every car will be mandated to have GPS logging onboard and you will pay at the pump via RFID. There is a reason that the .gov kept an interest in Onstar and it is available now for all cars. Won't be long before it's mandatory. Then they'll sell your driving habits to insurance companies like Apple and Google are selling your travel habits to businesses so they can market more directly to people who drive past their store every day.

It's time for a Constitutional Amenment with regard to privacy in the digital aid, both from the .gov and .biz.


+1000

With cars getting more MPG, it is only a matter of time until the .gov will put a tax on miles driven. Not that the .gov will give up their tax on the gas itself though.

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:12:54 PM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?


Why?



The problem with automated surveillance, from a privacy perspective, is the cost.  If I want to follow somebody around 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, it used to take several cops, and cost a lot of money.  But what if following someone for the month only costs $20?  What if it only costs .20 cents?  Suddenly it's easy for the state to track tens of thousands of vehicles –– Which have "No expectation of privacy"–– with one guy sitting at a computer.  Without technology, a big brother state isn't sustainable; it will run out of money, and probably only operate via paranoia in the first place.  Now?  Want to track everyone who shows up at a protest march, with thousands of people?  A Tea party rally?  No problem.  Then want to sort through all of their movements over the next 6 months, and see who drives by a known drug dealer house?  You can have that report in a few seconds.  Probable cause to send the SWAT team in to bust some druggies?  You tell me....

As the cost of implementing a police state approaches zero, some other safeguards must be put in place to prevent it's implementation.

Constant surveillance doesn't make society any safer (see Great Briton crime rate) but it most certainly becomes a tool for the state to use to oppress it's citizens.

Personally, I think because of the potential for abuse, automated surveillance should require a warrant, per person and per method, regardless of whether their is an expectation of privacy or not.

Further, I think we need legal limits on data retention, and cross-investigation use.  (i.e. Data obtained because you thought the guy was a terrorist is inadmissible if all you catch him doing is littering, and charge him with that)

I also think we need a constitutional amendment regarding automobiles (or more generally, transportation), and the fact that it's a convenient fiction that driving is a privilege, when it's nearly required to exercise nearly other right....  This would also address the TSA violations (Although I think the actions of the TSA are unconstitutional today, they are apparently above the law)
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:23:01 PM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I wonder if the ACLU will be all over that?


Why?



The problem with automated surveillance, from a privacy perspective, is the cost.  If I want to follow somebody around 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, it used to take several cops, and cost a lot of money.  But what if following someone for the month only costs $20?  What if it only costs .20 cents?  Suddenly it's easy for the state to track tens of thousands of vehicles –– Which have "No expectation of privacy"–– with one guy sitting at a computer.  Without technology, a big brother state isn't sustainable; it will run out of money, and probably only operate via paranoia in the first place.  Now?  Want to track everyone who shows up at a protest march, with thousands of people?  A Tea party rally?  No problem.  Then want to sort through all of their movements over the next 6 months, and see who drives by a known drug dealer house?  You can have that report in a few seconds.  Probable cause to send the SWAT team in to bust some druggies?  You tell me....

As the cost of implementing a police state approaches zero, some other safeguards must be put in place to prevent it's implementation.

Constant surveillance doesn't make society any safer (see Great Briton crime rate) but it most certainly becomes a tool for the state to use to oppress it's citizens.

Personally, I think because of the potential for abuse, automated surveillance should require a warrant, per person and per method, regardless of whether their is an expectation of privacy or not.

Further, I think we need legal limits on data retention, and cross-investigation use.  (i.e. Data obtained because you thought the guy was a terrorist is inadmissible if all you catch him doing is littering, and charge him with that)

I also think we need a constitutional amendment regarding automobiles (or more generally, transportation), and the fact that it's a convenient fiction that driving is a privilege, when it's nearly required to exercise nearly other right....  This would also address the TSA violations (Although I think the actions of the TSA are unconstitutional today, they are apparently above the law)


I want this guy's newsletter.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:44:02 PM EDT
Quoted:
A license plate is a government-issued identification device meant to be observable, obvious, easily readable and tied to a car and a registered owner.  No-one has ANY expectation of privacy while driving a car on the public street.

People need to get over their anonymity whining.

By the way - automated license plate reading has been in use for 15 years that I am aware of - I'm sure even longer.  It isn't new.


It's in use all over the country...

There are portable versions that mount on police cars...a cop can scan a Walmart parking lot in 10-15 minutes....


Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:56:44 PM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
NYC does this too in certain areas.  they also use it to catch people driving with expired tags (they get a ticket in the mail)

Ah- there's the rub. It's all about no-risk tax collection. Just dun them without actually having to confront them on the highway. Uh oh- that's going to put a lot of traffic cops out of work....

I've only seen the red light cameras here in NYC.

What are those portable hunting blind looking things NYPD put up ?

A complete waste of taxpayer's money called "Skywatch".
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 10:05:47 PM EDT
The city of Medina, where Bill Gates lives, did this a few years back.  http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2009873854_medina16m.html
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 10:10:11 PM EDT
Quoted:
Covering your plate with a false or stolen one is one low-tech solution, as is driving around the entrances unless the whole danged community is fenced off.


Your first suggestion is illegal, and your second one appears to advocate for driving across peoples private property to avoid the monitored public roadway, something that also isn't going to fly in highly developed areas.

Next suggestion?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 10:12:07 PM EDT
They do it here on the PA turnpike now the State troopers either sit at toll booths scanning plates or cruise the fast lane scanning the plates of the cars they pass. They also sit on the parkway in the am scanning every plate that goes by during rush hour. Now they only pull over the ones they really want.  I've noticed little Mt.Pleasant PD has it too ––they have like one car two officers ––the night shift guy has the cameras mounted and runs up and down every street scanning the parked cars in the late nite hours.  I'd like to know what the system costs but I will bet it pays for itself pretty fast.
automated license plate recognitiion
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 10:32:05 PM EDT
Quoted:
They do it here on the PA turnpike now the State troopers either sit at toll booths scanning plates or cruise the fast lane scanning the plates of the cars they pass. They also sit on the parkway in the am scanning every plate that goes by during rush hour. Now they only pull over the ones they really want.  I've noticed little Mt.Pleasant PD has it too ––they have like one car two officers ––the night shift guy has the cameras mounted and runs up and down every street scanning the parked cars in the late nite hours.  I'd like to know what the system costs but I will bet it pays for itself pretty fast.


The car-mounted systems run about 15K.
There really isn't a way to determine a system "paying for itself".
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 11:47:17 PM EDT
Quoted:
They do it here on the PA turnpike now the State troopers either sit at toll booths scanning plates or cruise the fast lane scanning the plates of the cars they pass. They also sit on the parkway in the am scanning every plate that goes by during rush hour. Now they only pull over the ones they really want.  I've noticed little Mt.Pleasant PD has it too ––they have like one car two officers ––the night shift guy has the cameras mounted and runs up and down every street scanning the parked cars in the late nite hours.  I'd like to know what the system costs but I will bet it pays for itself pretty fast.
automated license plate recognitiion


The video on Youtube where the officer for the city of Long Beach, CA demos their system says in the video that they log every plate they read during the shift, along with the time, date, and location of the unit that photographed it so that the information can be data-mined in the event that it is needed to solve a crime.

I have a problem with that. LE agencies don't need to keep records of every place I have been, though I expect it happens anyway with the road/freeway cameras in the area. I suspect that if you were to become a "person of interest" in my area a plate search in their database would put your car's last known location within 1/4 mile, day or night-there are just too many cameras to slip thru the cracks.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 11:49:55 PM EDT
Quoted:
The video on Youtube where the officer for the city of Long Beach, CA demos their system says in the video that they log every plate they read during the shift, along with the time, date, and location of the unit that photographed it so that the information can be data-mined in the event that it is needed to solve a crime.

I have a problem with that. LE agencies don't need to keep records of every place I have been, though I expect it happens anyway with the road/freeway cameras in the area. I suspect that if you were to become a "person of interest" in my area a plate search in their database would put your car's last known location within 1/4 mile, day or night-there are just too many cameras to slip thru the cracks.


Like you said, you'd be a person of interest. A suspect. You've got bigger issues at that point than whether your plate has been scanned by a passing plate reader.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 11:51:09 PM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
Covering your plate with a false or stolen one is one low-tech solution, as is driving around the entrances unless the whole danged community is fenced off.


Your first suggestion is illegal, and your second one appears to advocate for driving across peoples private property to avoid the monitored public roadway, something that also isn't going to fly in highly developed areas.

Next suggestion?


How about a necklace?

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 11:54:50 PM EDT
Quoted:
A license plate is a government-issued identification device meant to be observable, obvious, easily readable and tied to a car and a registered owner.  No-one has ANY expectation of privacy while driving a car on the public street.

People need to get over their anonymity whining.

By the way - automated license plate reading has been in use for 15 years that I am aware of - I'm sure even longer.  It isn't new.


I saw the first article about it around 1996, it was a laptop based unit with a single camera that was patrol car deployed  in a static role. It could do 3,000 plates an hour, which was astounding at the time. They are a lot better than that now, and the reporting is in real time.

ETA: They keep telling me that I have no expectation of privacy in public. I have a problem with that. As an American taxpayer, I OWN the road I travel on and I pay a yearly fee to maintain it. I should be able to retain my right to privacy on property I OWN. I fully understand that a license plate is intended to link a vehicle to it's owner, and that this method of identification is useful in LEO interactions with the public when civil infractions, misdemeamors etc. are committed. That's not the same thing as keeping a list of every place I have driven or being able to narrow down the location of my vehicle to within a 2 or 3 square block area at any time. The government, in any form, doesn't need to know where I go, what kind of activities I participate in, who I associate with, how many times a week I travel to XX, and what my average speeds are. No good can come from it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 12:02:34 AM EDT
Quoted:

In 2010, 19 property crimes and one violent crime were reported in the village. The most notable crimes last year were a series of home invasions, starting in November, during which women and girls were menaced.



How can there be 19 property crimes, and one violent crime reported in 2010, when they say a "series" of home invasions where victims were "menaced" occurred?

Is it just my math that is bad?
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 12:05:29 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 12:07:00 AM EDT
Quoted:
How about a necklace?

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/iprAsCibZtM/0.jpg


So now you're advocating criminal mischief? Destruction of property? Is that what you're saying?

Quoted:
15k per car? holy shit it seems like every police car around here has them.
 the day will coime when instead of just searching warrents and luicense revocations they will be able to flag any plate they want with all the cameras repirting to a fed database. no expectation of privacy so when cuomo decides he wants to know everywhere a political oppoment goes it's freely available and nysp have already shown they'll pull stunts like intimidating the woman who patterson's personal secretary roughed up


Typical system has 2-3 cameras, a laptop/monitor and a remote CPU. The 15K figure is at least 3-4 years old, so it might be more now.

In your scenario, the car plate reader only records the plates it passes,so   the person theoretically being harassed is being followed everywhere by a marked car with big honking cameras sprouting everywhere. You really think thats going to fly?

We can already flag any plate we need to; its called a manual entry so that if a car is stolen now, I can manually enter it to 1: figure out if I've recently passed that car and 2: alert me if I pass it in the near future before the plate is added to the regular data update the next day.
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