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Posted: 8/26/2004 8:46:41 PM EST
Isn't the Hornet made by Boeing?
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 8:50:50 PM EST
Isn't lockheed part of boeing now???
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 8:51:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/26/2004 8:54:06 PM EST by John91498]
McDonnell-Douglas is part of Boeing. McDonnell-Douglas originally made the Hornet. I think...
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 8:52:49 PM EST
The Hornet is a McDonnell Douglas bird.

E-95
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 9:01:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By E-95:
The Hornet is a McDonnell Douglas bird.

E-95



Didn't Beoing aquire McDonnell-Douglas a few years ago?
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 9:03:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By John91498:

Originally Posted By E-95:
The Hornet is a McDonnell Douglas bird.

E-95



Didn't Beoing aquire McDonnell-Douglas a few years ago?



Read post above, posted 10 minutes before your question.
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 9:45:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/26/2004 9:54:02 PM EST by E-95]

Originally Posted By LARRYG:

Originally Posted By John91498:

Originally Posted By E-95:
The Hornet is a McDonnell Douglas bird.

E-95



Didn't Beoing aquire McDonnell-Douglas a few years ago?



Read post above, posted 10 minutes before your question.



Ah! I keep forgetting about that! My bad.

E-95
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 10:07:04 PM EST
Boeing builds the forward fuselage and wings, and conducts final assembly.
Northrop Grumman supplys the center and aft fuselage.
General Electric Co. produces the engines.
Raytheon manufacturers the radar.



Northrop designed and built the YF-17.

However, the Northrop company had no experience with carrier-based aircraft, so they accepted an offer from McDonnell Douglas to collaborate on a naval adaptation of the YF-17 for the NACF contest.

Under the terms of the agreement worked out between the two corporations, McDonnell would market the aircraft to the Navy, and Northrop would be the prime subcontractor.

In addition, Northrop was to be given the rights to market a land-based version of the design to various foreign air forces.

On May 2, 1975, the Navy announced that they had opted for the Northrop/McDonnell Douglas proposal.

The Navy liked the twin-engined format of the Northrop/McDonnell Douglas submission, which they felt would be better suited to operations at sea.

In addition, the Navy felt that the YF-17 development possessed greater potentiality for multi-mission capability.

According to the original plan, the Northrop/McDonnell Douglas aircraft was intended to be procured in three closely related models--the single-seat F-18 which would replace the F-4 Phantom in the fighter role, the single-seat A-18 which would replace the A-7 Corsair II in the attack role, and the two seat TF-18A combat trainer.

The F-18 and the A-18 were to share the same basic airframe and engine arrangement, but were to differ in stores attachments and in the avionics.

The two-seat TF-18A was to retain the full mission capability and armament suite of the F-18A, but was to have slightly reduced fuel capacity.

Eventually, however, careful redesign made it possible to merge the two single-seat fighter and attack versions into a single aircraft, which was initially referred to as F/A-18A in Defense Department press releases.

Although no orders had yet been received, a land-based version known as the F-18L was also planned.

Because it did not have to be carrier-capable, the F-18L was expected to be significantly lighter and better-performing than the carrier-based version.

The F-18 program went ahead with the award of letter contracts in November of 1975 to General Electric for the development of the F404 turbofans and on January 22, 1976 to McDonnell for nine single-seat and two two-seat Full-Scale Development (FSD) aircraft.

As part of the agreement between McDonnell Douglas and Northrop, it was decided that fabrication of the baseline F-18 would be split roughly 60/40 between McDD and Northrop, respectively.

If orders were received for the F-18L land-based version, these proportions would be reversed.

Northrop was to build the center and aft fuselage sections of the F-18 as well as both vertical fins in El Segundo, Ca.

McDD's contribution would consist of the wings, the horizontal tail, and the forward fuselage, including the cockpit built in St. Louis, Mo.

The Northrop subassemblies are shipped to McDonnell at St Louis where final assembly takes place.

Link Posted: 8/27/2004 3:21:54 AM EST
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