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Posted: 12/17/2009 2:34:48 AM EDT
W.E.B. Griffin- military and police fiction.  I like his larger than life characters and how he fits real people and events into the story.  His humor and details are great.  He will spend a page and a half outlining a charater and their history only to kill him 2 pages later.    He knows guns and military lore.

John Sandford- police crime fiction.  He main character is dark and flawed.  His plots are entertaining and have great twists.  I lived in Minn/ St P for a summer and winter and so I know some of the places he talks about.

Harry Turtledove- Sci Fi.  Knows the equipment he writes about in his stories and has interesting characters.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 2:47:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 2:48:23 AM EDT by Tech-Com]
Stephen Hunter is great. Hopefully I will get the latest Bob Lee Swagger book this Christmas, but dang he must be 80 years old in the most recent book lol. He was already pretty old in the last one.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 2:54:27 AM EDT
chuck palahniuk- Funny, and original.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 3:08:29 AM EDT
Isaac Asimov. Some of the stuff he wrote about 50 years ago we now have. The Foundation series is my all time fav right next to Lord of the Rings by Tolkien.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 3:09:12 AM EDT
My favorite fiction authors are Al Gore and L Ron Hubbard.


I've never read their books, but I think it is kind of neat they both spawned new religions.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 3:36:23 AM EDT
Tom Clancy.  I really enjoy reading the Jack Ryan and the John Kelly books.  For what it is worth, Without Remorse is my favorite book, and I think that it would make a kick ass movie.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 3:41:36 AM EDT
Sandford.  He's the only bestseller fiction author I buy in hardback.   For character development and use of dialog, he is unparalleled in the genre.  His Davenport character is indeed dark and flawed.  The more recent one, Virgil Flowers, is quirky and eccentric.  I like them both.


Jane



Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:14:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 4:18:45 AM EDT by cammobunker]
John Ringo! Who doesn't hate the Posleen, or love the Keldara?

Michael Z. Williamson A true conservative author

Simon Scarrow Adventure with the Roman Legions!

WEB griffin 'nuff said

Lindsey Davis Mysteries set in ancient Rome, with an entertaining cast of characters. She knows her Roman History, too.

Bernard Cornwell BEST historical fiction guy out there. SHARPE'S creator.

A. Conan Doyle I say, the game's afoot.


And why has nobody said
Rudyard Kipling?
He said every damn thing there is to say about soldiering, 100 years ago.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:19:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sherrick13:
W.E.B. Griffin- military and police fiction.  I like his larger than life characters and how he fits real people and events into the story.  His humor and details are great.  He will spend a page and a half outlining a charater and their history only to kill him 2 pages later.    He knows guns and military lore.

John Sandford- police crime fiction.  He main character is dark and flawed.  His plots are entertaining and have great twists.  I lived in Minn/ St P for a summer and winter and so I know some of the places he talks about.

Harry Turtledove- Sci Fi.  Knows the equipment he writes about in his stories and has interesting characters.


Holy crap, you got two of mine right off the bat.  

I've never read John Sandford, but I guess now I have to.

I'll add Robert Heinlein to the list.  And Larry Niven.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:21:21 AM EDT
Originally Posted By efpeter:
My favorite fiction authors are Al Gore and L Ron Hubbard.


I've never read their books, but I think it is kind of neat they both spawned new religions.


I see what you did there

I collected and read the Matt Helm series of books by Donald Hamilton when I was younger.
If you are familiar with the campy movies starring Dean Martin as Matt Helm, you should know that the films share almost NO SIMILARITY WHATSOEVER to the books.

Why I liked them: entertaining, gritty, not politically correct (from an older era), & realistic. More realistic than James Bond (to whom the Matt Helm character is often compared).

I also liked that with a little searching I was able to buy most of them for $1 or $2 each.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:22:21 AM EDT
C.S. Lewis - Not just for the Narnia series (which are some of my favorite of all time), but also for his space trilogy...

J.R.R. Tolkein - LOTR / Hobbit both are fantastic reads...
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:24:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:27:55 AM EDT
The Rat Pack Mysteries series by Robert Randisi have been a fun read. The good 'ol days when men were men and women were dolls.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:31:44 AM EDT
Dostoevsky - will always be my favorite.  Incredible plots, intense characterization, fast pace, thoughtful themes.  Very readable; you cannot put him down.
Salman Rushdie - I discovered him a few years ago and have been reading several of his novels per year. Vibrant language, shocking plots. I also listened to one of his books-on-tape read by him, which was an added bonus to enjoying it.
Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien - good scifi and fantasy for escapism.  (If you have never read the short story collections by Asimov and Bradbury, you are missing out. Don't just read their novels.  The short stories are great too, just less well-known.)
David Mamet, Chuck Palahniuk and Don DeLillo for more current sensibilities.
Another neat playwright I recently found is Yasmina Reza. I have only read three of her plays, but she is worth a mention. If you like Mamet, you would like her too.
I'm open to new suggestions from others in the thread too.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:36:20 AM EDT
Another vote for Ringo. There is a Kildar fantasy in every man whether he is willing to admit it or not.

And Williamson. Haven't read a bad one yet. Both Sci-fi and contemporary military.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:38:08 AM EDT
Bernard Cornwell - His historical fiction is quite good. He writes alot in the medieval era. You don't find much in that age as well researched.  He does get formulaic though, probably because he's written so much.

Steven Pressfield - Ancient greek historical fictionis awesome. Gates of Fire anyone?  All his stuff is well researched and gives great detail. His book  The Afghan Campaign is my favorite.

George MacDonald Fraser - His Flashman (Napoleonic era) series is a fun read and his memoir of his time in Burma in WW2 is good read also.

There's more, but these are just off the top of my head.

Link Posted: 12/17/2009 4:53:37 AM EDT
lee child
cj box
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:00:05 AM EDT
Me!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:01:48 AM EDT
Poe.

I like the macabre.

Verne would be my second choice.  

The style of writing and the plot has always kept my intrest.



jb
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:02:02 AM EDT
C.S. Lewis: fantasy, science fiction, and religion.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:40:27 AM EDT
sherrick13 - hilarious economy fiction author!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:41:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By R_Fury:
Tom Clancy.  I really enjoy reading the Jack Ryan and the John Kelly books.  For what it is worth, Without Remorse is my favorite book, and I think that it would make a kick ass movie.


Isn't it slated for 2011?
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:03:25 AM EDT
H Rider Haggard- Alain Quartermain FTW!
Heinlein- Loved everything I have read of his.
Palanuik-(spelling-Fight Club guy) Different every time
Dean Koontz- wierdo. cool shit though
the Late Michael Crichton- great yarns intensly researched. Also had the balls to say global warming was bullshit in a mainstream novel..and backed it up with facts!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:17:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:18:33 AM EDT by ServiceGun]
Julian May

I've been reading SciFi for 30 years and haven't enjoyed anything more than her Saga of Pliocene Exile series
(The Many Colored Land, The Golden Torc, The Nonborn King, The Adversary)
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:22:46 AM EDT
Clive Cussler.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:24:12 AM EDT
The one that sticks out in my mind is David Drake, I love the Hammer's Slammers books.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:24:17 AM EDT
Orson Scott Card
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:24:46 AM EDT
As a teenager in the 70's I really got into Fredrick Forsythe. Just loved his Cold War/Red terrorist/Espionage stories.

In the 80's I discovered this new writer Tom Clancy. Loved the continuation of the Cold War espionage themes with a cool technical background now.

Issac Asimov...I found his style a bit dry and boring but despite having read The Foundation Trilogy some 30 years ago many characters and parts of the story are still fresh in my mind.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:28:05 AM EDT
Vince Flynn
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:42:07 PM EDT
Neal Stephenson
Books- Cryptonomicon, Snow Crash

Why-Sgt. Bobby Shaftoe, The Dentata scene... generally his protagonists are complete screw-ups that only manage to save the day by through no fault of their own.

Plus, Stephenson knows what he's writing about... not by just explaining that he knows what he's writing about but by demonstrating that he knows his subjects.  Case in point, in Cryptonomican, he explains how to use a deck of cards to send coded messages back and forth by playing a "solitare" game.

Skip Zodiac if you don't like eco terrorists as heros.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:54:30 PM EDT
Victor Hugo, because Les Miserables is my favourite book.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 5:56:38 PM EDT
Heinlein, Asimov, and Carl Hiaasen - incredible imagination and plot twists; he makes me laugh out loud.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:21:03 PM EDT
John Sanford: police / crime fiction.  Lucas Davenpost FTW.
Brian Haig: military justice with Sean Drummond.  Thoroughly enjoyable.
Barry Eisler: "Rain" series about an assassin. Good stuff.
Stephen King: until around '92 and "Gerald's Game".  Stuff since then has been noticeably downhill.  Salem's Lot is remarkable and should be read by enyone interested in Vampire fiction.
J.R.R. Tolkein: LotR and The Hobbit.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: all the Sherlock Holmes stories as well as The Lost World.
Edgar Rice Burroughs: Tarzan of the Apes.  'Nuff said!"

And for those interested in this kind of stuff: Doc Savage, the Man of Bronze.  Classic early 20th Century escapist fiction.  Kinda dated now, but they certainly kept me interested in my teen years!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:27:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:28:45 PM EDT by jarlragnar]




Originally Posted By KC-130 FLT ENG:

Bernard Cornwell - His historical fiction is quite good. He writes alot in the medieval era. You don't find much in that age as well researched. He does get formulaic though, probably because he's written so much.



Steven Pressfield - Ancient greek historical fictionis awesome. Gates of Fire anyone? All his stuff is well researched and gives great detail. His book The Afghan Campaign is my favorite.



George MacDonald Fraser - His Flashman (Napoleonic era) series is a fun read and his memoir of his time in Burma in WW2 is good read also.



There's more, but these are just off the top of my head.







Bernard Cornwell is AWESOME.



I also like Robert E. Howard and Patrick O'Brien.



ETA: and Wilbur Smith
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:30:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:33:56 PM EDT by ttushooter]
Tom Clancy for me.  Although its been quite some time since i've read his books.  

David Baldacci is the most recent author i've started to pick up on.  "the collectors" was a very good book IMO.

ETA: douglas Adams.  Love the hitchhiker series.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:30:31 PM EDT
Terry Pratchett

Great humor without resorting to toilet funnies or profanity.  It is the true mark of a good comic when he/she does not have to resort to "shock" (profanity) to make you laugh.  

Favorite books:  Guards, Guards, Guards! and Unseen Academicals.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:35:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:36:18 PM EDT by Dog1]
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:36:12 PM EDT
Heinlein was good early on, but he went nuts later on. Degenerated into every book being about incest and nudity.

I agree with Orson Scott Card. Also Clancy.

Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:36:51 PM EDT
John Steinbeck.


Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:37:27 PM EDT
Heinlein or Turtledove. Both very creative.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:38:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:54:40 PM EDT by Pangea]
Elmore Leonard

Cormack Mcarthy

Stephen Hunter

eta Dean Ing
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:39:46 PM EDT
Dale Brown - I like sci-fi modern airplane battles.

Michael Dimercurio (sp) ^ with Submarines.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:40:01 PM EDT
Robert McCammon  Swan Song and Boys Life were excellent, but so are all of his other books.



Orson Scott Card  Author of the best fiction book ever.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:41:46 PM EDT
C.F. Forester

Hornblower rules!  Forester does an excellent job of bringing the stories to life!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:44:18 PM EDT
heinlein



h beam piper




beause they both make some sense and are good storytellers





niven and foster are good as well


Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:46:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:47:22 PM EDT by Izzman]
James Clavell - Shogun (Long, but very, very interesting)

John Ringo - The Last Centurion (The funnest book I've ever read)

Ayn Rand - Atlas Shrugged, Anthem, and The Fountainhead (The Fountainhead probably being my favorite, Atlas Shrugged isn't really fiction anymore)

ETA: George Orwell
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:46:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2009 6:54:46 PM EDT by Wyzardd]
Clive Cussler - He's like all the mindless action movies at once
Alistair MacLean - Classic spy stuff, and he brought us "Guns of Navarone", "Where Eagles Dare", "Bear Island" (so that makes up for "Force 10 From Navarone")
Roger Zelazny - Far out fantasy type stuff without a trace of hobbits 'n' crap

ETA - I forgot Arthur Conan Doyle!
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:49:51 PM EDT
H.P. Lovecraft, the master of horror.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:51:25 PM EDT
I'm into old science fiction.
My two favorites are Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury.
There are many many others - to many to mention.
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 6:55:53 PM EDT
Barack H Obama, The Audacity of Hope
Link Posted: 12/17/2009 9:23:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tech-Com:
Stephen Hunter is great. Hopefully I will get the latest Bob Lee Swagger book this Christmas, but dang he must be 80 years old in the most recent book lol. He was already pretty old in the last one.


He is on my list.
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