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Posted: 5/25/2004 10:10:55 AM EST
Hi all I just got courious after A recent linux thread.
How many of us here are active linux users?
I use Mandrake, RedHat(Fedora), & Debain.
So how about you guys?
Link Posted: 5/25/2004 8:03:30 PM EST
Mostly Mandrake user here. I've also run Red Hat, Connectiva, Debian and Knoppix installed. Of the three computers in my home, only the kids use Windows. Almost everyone at my work uses Debian so to go with the flow I tried it for a full year before going back to my true love Mandrake. I get ribbed alot for Mandrake as well as using KDE rather than Gnome but I'll be damned if I have problems setting proper perms just to get my sound card to work. When I do an install, I can be up and running within 15 minutes with a configured web server to boot. Those Debian guys are still compiling their kernel while I am already browsing ar15.com. To each his own I guess.

Link Posted: 5/25/2004 8:15:23 PM EST
I have used Red Hat, Mandrake, BSD, and Debian over the years.

I just installed Fedora Core1 within the last few weeks.. I really like it alot. I think it is finally close to an OS than alot more people can just pick up and start using.
Link Posted: 5/25/2004 8:18:57 PM EST
I'm mostly a RedHat guy, because that's what I'm used to at work, but I run Debian on my Xbox.
Link Posted: 5/25/2004 8:34:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 2:48:42 AM EST by raskwon]
I have been dual booting winxp and fedora core1 for the last 6 months. I recently tried to migrate to fedore core 2, But a bug caused me to lose my xp partition. I plan to go back to fedora core 1 for awhile.

Link Posted: 5/25/2004 9:05:04 PM EST
I've used RH & Mandrake, tried Lycoris. Liked RH the best, Mandrake never did it for me & the font just sucks. Would like to try Suse 9.0, infact if anybody has it & wouldn't mind sending me a copy I'd appreciate it (I'll pay shipping of course).

BTW mods, distributing copys of Linux Distro's is not illeagal.
Link Posted: 5/25/2004 10:17:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/25/2004 10:17:31 PM EST by Terrato]
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
YOU WILL BE ASSIMILATED

Link Posted: 5/26/2004 12:14:16 AM EST
<--- Debian Developer.


Link Posted: 5/26/2004 1:27:12 AM EST
I run suze quite a lot. Very handy, slick as can be.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:11:31 AM EST
Just took an IBM install linux on pSeries class. It works.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:18:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 2:19:23 AM EST by Mordak]
I use Slackware 9.1 on one of my laptops. Then I also like the Knoppix Live Disc that boot right off the CD. I used to use SuSE for a couple of years then moved to Mandrake for all the extra features. I plan on trying the Fedora Core 2 when I get a chance. I have had such good luck with my Slackware install that I don't want to screw with it.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:41:07 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:48:19 AM EST
I have one Red Hat machine at home.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:53:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By raskwon:
I have been dual booting winxp and fedora core1 for the last 6 months. I recently tried to migrate to fedore core 2, But a bug caused me to lose my xp partition. I plan to go back to fedora core 1 for awhile.




I just downloaded core2 yesterday to dual boot on my laptop. I guess I'll wait
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:50:49 AM EST
Started with slackware in 95(?), have used debian, currently have FC1 at home, support about a dozen or so linux boxes at work, about half RH EL3, others mix of RH 7.3 and 8.0 with errata now mostly provided by Fedora Legacy, although they ain't exactly speedy about releases.

Rocko
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:52:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By enigma1:
I've used RH & Mandrake, tried Lycoris. Liked RH the best, Mandrake never did it for me & the font just sucks. Would like to try Suse 9.0, infact if anybody has it & wouldn't mind sending me a copy I'd appreciate it (I'll pay shipping of course).

BTW mods, distributing copys of Linux Distro's is not illeagal.



SUSE 9.1 is now available. If you have the bandwidth and speed necessasary you can do an FTP install or even download the entire FTP tree and create your own ISO of SUSE. These are instructions for SUSE 9.0 but they work equally well with 9.1.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 4:10:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 5:47:52 AM EST by Daggar]

Originally Posted By enigma1:
I've used RH & Mandrake, tried Lycoris. Liked RH the best, Mandrake never did it for me & the font just sucks. Would like to try Suse 9.0, infact if anybody has it & wouldn't mind sending me a copy I'd appreciate it (I'll pay shipping of course).

BTW mods, distributing copys of Linux Distro's is not illeagal.



As to the fonts, I think you may want to check out the latest. Here is a screenshot of my desktop and great fonts.
Screenshot

OK come on guys. So far only one of you who has clicked on the link has been running Linux
Here it is straight out of my access log

66.176.xxx.xx - - [26/May/2004:07:49:05 -0600] "GET /extras/snapshot1.jpg HTTP/1.1" 200 271554 "http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=245853" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.6) Gecko/20040207 Firefox/0.8"
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 4:23:42 AM EST
RedHat since the late 90s, OpenOffice apps, just started playing with Knoppix to use for InfoSec audits.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 4:25:44 AM EST
anyone have any luck with vmware on fedora core? can't get the cdroom to boot, even using an iso
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 4:31:52 AM EST
I use linux and love it!

Use RH 9 and SuSE 9.1 I have a boat load of ISO's we just downloaded for a class but I have yet to extract or install them.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 4:38:58 AM EST
Irix, Solaris and BEos represent!
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:10:28 AM EST
RH since 5.0 and now OpenNA Linux. Great base Linux version. Also check out the kernal for the version for the NSA - very secure.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:25:16 AM EST
Been a linux dork for almost a decade now, Big Gentoo fan.

Doc
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:29:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:50:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 6:54:29 AM EST by GodBlessTexas]
Linux dork for almost a decade now. I've started with Slackware 1.3 that I installed from floppies because my proprietary CD-ROM wasn't supported. I've used Slackware, Red Hat, Debian, and gentoo, but lately I've come to realize that OpenBSD > Linux. I just like starting from a very minimal system and building exactly what I want. Most modern linux distributions are so filled with crap that I'll never use.

BTW, I got the chance to hang out with Linus and buy him a beer a couple of years ago. A really nice guy and a pleasure to be around. He takes hims geek fans and fame in stride and is probably the most personable guy in the Open Source movement.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:55:38 AM EST
Redhat/Fedora, openBSD user here.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 9:35:40 AM EST

Originally Posted By tc6969:

Originally Posted By raskwon:
a bug caused me to loose my xp partition.


<-------
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|
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V



Ok, so you are the spelling moderator??
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 9:50:47 AM EST
Redhat on one of my machines at home, Windows XP on the other.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 9:51:21 AM EST
Wow this is freaking great.
I had no idea their were this many Linux users here.
Everybody does know that Knoppix is basicly Debain right?
I would not install Debain any outher way tho...I have found it to be A pain the ass, Abd besides... A Knoppix HDD install is so easy since 3.3.
I just prefure Mandrake, And yes I do get crap rom my Debain buddies...But like Daggar said

Daggar Said,
Those Debian guys are still compiling their kernel while I am already browsing ar15.com.


Got to love it.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 9:53:25 AM EST
Redhat
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 9:54:22 AM EST

I run gentoo on my two servers at work. I run Mac OS X on my Powerbook.

Chris
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 10:11:06 AM EST
Mandrake user here.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 10:24:05 AM EST

Windows XP makes the best desktop, period end of story. Argue all you want. Linux can make a good desktop, however nothing beats Windows XP in usability, software availability, and games of course.

But Linux does make an awesome server. I run Slackware Linux 9.1 (2.4.22) on a machine at home as a JDK/Tomcat development server. I've been running Slackware since Slackware 2.3 (kernel 1.2) which was around 1995-ish. So I'm almost a 10 year Linux veteran. Remember that when you try to flame my earlier comments.

Here at work we run a lot of Redhat 7.3 for production servers, but we also run a lot of Windows 2000 servers, Windows 2003 servers, and some Solaris too.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 10:27:15 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 10:30:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 10:49:41 AM EST by meltdown]

Originally Posted By peekay:
anyone have any luck with vmware on fedora core? can't get the cdroom to boot, even using an iso



did you try to pass some parameters to the kernel as described in the readme file?
Fedora Core 2 running as a guest operating system under VMware
Workstation 4.5.1 is known to be problematic unless you disable
virtual dynamic shared object support with the following kernel boot
parameter:

vdso=0
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 10:50:35 AM EST

Originally Posted By MichaelSavage:
Windows XP makes the best desktop, period end of story. Argue all you want. Linux can make a good desktop, however nothing beats Windows XP in usability, software availability, and games of course.



I certainly won't argue the point since everyone has different needs and wants for a desktop. As for me, Mandrake 10 was what finally made me make the 100% desktop switch. I have never run a Windows based server but for years have run my Web, FTP and Mail servers on Linux. My workstation at work has always run Linux partially because it does have the tools I need working for a large ISP. I typically keep about 12 different terminals open on my desktop at one time connected to a variety of Linux and Unix servers. Along with these terminals I will keep an open browser, IRC session and IM running. Virtual desktops are manditory for my work. Tools such as mtr, nmap, Ethereal and a host of other monitoring software just aren't easily found in the Windows world.

Now back to why I changed to a 100% Linux desktop at home, I simply got so tired of dealing with so many viruses, adware, spyware, trojans and all the other crap that exists in the Windows world. Along with that, Mandrake supports all the hardware I have right out of the box. I run a TV tuner card and I want my TV on my desktop (TVtime and XawTV). I have it. I have a DVD burner and it will play back DVDs (Totem, Xine, MPlayer) as well as easily burns them (K3b is great). My Canon G2 will download RAW formated files (gPhoto2) and allows me to convert them to .tif or .jpg. My fonts look arguably better under Linux than Windows. I simply ran out of excuses not to dump Windows.

I often am able to work from home and although many people run Windows Remote Desktop between two computers, I can simply open a terminal and securely ssh to my work box. Since EVERYTHING Linux can run from the command line, I can easily administer whatever is needed wherever I may be. Of course another cool ability is to be able to run an X session remotely that originates on another computer.

Well enough of my proselyting. i know I am preaching to the choir.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 11:34:21 AM EST
Mandrake user here
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 11:39:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By MillerSHO:
I feel like such a loser.

I'm a Network/computer consultant and I've never even really touched any flavor of Linux.

I work on microsoft all day and when I get home, I don't want to work on computers.

Do you guys think I'm harming the future of my career by not opening my mind to these different unix kernels?



I would say you're a loser. It's like most car mechanics don't want to work on their cars at home on their time off or carpenters don't feel like working on their own houses, it perfectly normal. As far as harming your career, I think it is good to keep as many doors open for yourself as possible. You won't need linux if you never plan to move in that direction but it can't hurt to know what the other guys use. Certainly certifications would be needed if you plan to administer a Linux network. I just love the fact that it's free and completely customizable. You can't know enough about it. Linux is almost limitless. Micro$oft controls what you can know and do with their product. Linux as an OS in it's pure form, minus all the GUI's, is as free as the air you breathe (within the GPL of course). Plus it's just damn fun to use IMHO anyway.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 1:58:05 PM EST
Mandrake user here.

Tried MDK 8.0 out first--liked it, but found a few reasons other than gaming to still retain and use my W98SE partition. Since 9.2, or more precisely after learning the ins-n-outs a little better as well as finding a P2P app (Overnet/Edonkey2K) that works well, I only find myself (increasingly rare these days) rebooting into Windows for PC gaming. Still need to grab the 10.0 ISOs and give that version a whirl.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 2:15:09 PM EST
Slackware fan myself. It is the first one I have seen that keeps relatively up to date, and allows me to freely run what I want. My chosen Desktop is enlightenment. Tried debian, but it seems that most debian users are extremely anal about proven stability, which as simply a hobbyist, I can afford downtime. If I ever put a system up that needed to be rock stable, I'd go with debian.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:01:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 3:09:50 PM EST by MichaelSavage]

Originally Posted By Daggar:
I certainly won't argue the point since everyone has different needs and wants for a desktop. As for me, Mandrake 10 was what finally made me make the 100% desktop switch. I have never run a Windows based server but for years have run my Web, FTP and Mail servers on Linux. My workstation at work has always run Linux partially because it does have the tools I need working for a large ISP. I typically keep about 12 different terminals open on my desktop at one time connected to a variety of Linux and Unix servers. Along with these terminals I will keep an open browser, IRC session and IM running. Virtual desktops are manditory for my work. Tools such as mtr, nmap, Ethereal and a host of other monitoring software just aren't easily found in the Windows world.



This is true... it does depend what you need from your desktop. I can see that an ISP tech like yourself might need linux tools on your desktop. And I agree that Madrake 10 / Redhat 9 are totally awesome for desktops. The installers are very nice, the hardware detection works very well, and the pre-packaged KDE is slick. However, I would suggest that you could do the opposite of what you are doing by running all of these linux tools on a Linux machine remotely from a Windows XP workstation, and you could keep the best desktop OS in the world on your desktop. I run Windows XP on my desktop mostly because of Microsoft Office 2003 and Internet Explorer 6. These are two awesome pieces of software that won't run on anything but Windows XP. Also, at home my desktop is XP because of games.


Originally Posted By Daggar:
Now back to why I changed to a 100% Linux desktop at home, I simply got so tired of dealing with so many viruses, adware, spyware, trojans and all the other crap that exists in the Windows world. Along with that, Mandrake supports all the hardware I have right out of the box. I run a TV tuner card and I want my TV on my desktop (TVtime and XawTV). I have it. I have a DVD burner and it will play back DVDs (Totem, Xine, MPlayer) as well as easily burns them (K3b is great). My Canon G2 will download RAW formated files (gPhoto2) and allows me to convert them to .tif or .jpg.



I was impressed by the hardware support in Mandrake 10 and Redhat 9. However, there is no doubt which OS has the largest driver library on the planet: XP.

I keep my XP machines patched up, and my browser manners are very good. I never get trojans/viruses/spyware on my machines. I did get one virus a few months ago through a windows RPC service exploitation but McAffee assassinated it, Microsoft Update automatically patched the exploit, and I never saw it again. However, I will agree with you that it is fairly easy to trash an XP installation if you don't have super-anal-retentive browsing manners.

I think XP is better on the desktop for a few reasons. First of all, IMO the user interface is superior to KDE or Gnome. This is arguable, but the XP UI is just damn solid. Microsoft has been refining this UI for about 20 years with tons of money. Another thing is the software library. I cannot imagine leaving behind Word, Excel, Project, Outlook, IE6, Textpad, etc. And there's no doubt that XP is far superior for games, but let's leave that out for now.


Originally Posted By Daggar:
My fonts look arguably better under Linux than Windows. I simply ran out of excuses not to dump Windows.



Have you ever enabled the 'ClearType' font smoothing in Windows XP? Most people don't know about it.

Right Click on desktop -> Properties -> Appearance -> Effects

Enable: "Use the following method to smooth edges of screen fonts:"

Select: "ClearType"

After that the fonts will look so damn sweet that you'll switch back to XP.


Originally Posted By Daggar:
I often am able to work from home and although many people run Windows Remote Desktop between two computers, I can simply open a terminal and securely ssh to my work box. Since EVERYTHING Linux can run from the command line, I can easily administer whatever is needed wherever I may be. Of course another cool ability is to be able to run an X session remotely that originates on another computer.



To me the terminal capabilities are a wash between the two OS's. Either one can open telnet, SSH, VNC, Remote Desktop, X terminal, etc. Remote Desktop is totally awesome and is built right in to XP. Oh, and on Windows Servers nearly EVERYTHING can be managed through GUI's, not conveluded command line tools. Remote Desktop will let you manage ALL aspects of a Windows server remotely.

My biggest problems with Linux on the desktop are:

1) On linux maintenance is your problem. You have to chase down patches, fixes, and updates yourself, potentially from many different sources. In fact sometimes you have to recompile stuff to update it. On XP, you can just visit the Windows Update web page once a week and ALL aspects of the OS are kept up to date by Microsoft. In fact XP ships with an Automatic Update service that will AUTOMATICALLY download and install patches and updates from Microsoft. Microsoft has the science of updating software figured out better than any body else in the world in my opinion. On the linux side, I often find myself screwing around with makefiles, libraries and complilers all damn day trying to get some software working on my particular linux installation, or trying to get kernel security patches in place, and I'm no idiot. On XP maintenance is Microsoft's problem. Updates are managed by ONE entity (Microsoft), and so their compatibility with each other is ensured. Linux is essencially a kernel and a collection of applications that are maintained by various socialist children all over the planet. It's not their problem if application A doesn't work with libraries X, but application B needs libraries Y, but libraries Y has a bug and doesn't work with application C. The dependencies are a nightmare and it's nobodies probablem but yours. This isn't necessarily always a problem, but I think it is one reason why XP is superior. Big money maintains it.

2) Ease of use - even with KDE or Gnome on top of X, simple tasks often take more effort. It would be hard to argue that any flavor of Linux (even the outstanding Madrake 10 and Redhat 9) are as easy to use as Windows XP.

3) Software availability - it is hard for me to survive without Textpad 4.7.2, Office 2003, and Call of Duty.

I'm not trying to put down Linux. I just think that for your average user, XP is superior as a desktop OS.

Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:12:46 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:16:40 PM EST
kpel308, Mandrake 10 Official iso's are out now. Got an email from Mandrakesoft Team yesterday. I'm Downloading right now.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:18:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:34:14 PM EST
Linux user since SLS in Oct 92. Used Red Hat from 1997 until 2001 then moved to Debian and I'm not planning on using anything else for the rest of my life. First used Linux in a production environment in 1994 as a reverse terminal server. Since then, I've used it as a router, file server, print server, terminal server, graphical (X Win) terminal server, thin client, desktop system, mail server, Oracle DB server, and for many other things. I've had several systems that have had 600+ day uptimes while under heavy loads. Like I said, I don't plan on using anything else for the rest of my life.


You have to chase down patches, fixes, and updates yourself, potentially from many different sources.


That's much less true of Linux than of Windows! For example, with Debian:

apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade

Done. I find Window's method of having to trackdown multiple vendors with (assuming they even provide updates via the Internet) different web sites very cumbersome. With Debian, if you're using all Debian packages (and most everything you'll ever need is already packaged so that it a true statement for the vast majority of users) that's all you have to do. It, unlike for Windows, provides a single source all updates and patches.z
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 3:41:17 PM EST


Win XP is crap for a desktop and as an OS in general, IE is the worst browser every forced upon mankind. PERIOD

There now that I got that out of my system, Michael Savage, try MAC OSX you'll never go back!
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:19:08 PM EST
Like MillerSHO, I've been a Net Admin for 15 years, but never messed with Linux. What's the best version to get started in on a desktop? Which one on a server?

Michael
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:40:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/26/2004 6:43:23 PM EST by Daggar]
I would say for the average user Windows is a better desktop choice. However the polish of Linux is starting to narrow that gap substantially. If you are technically inclined and like to tinker with your OS it can't be beat. Also true most of the tools I mentioned run fine on Windows but I do find any kind of tcp dump really hammers the processor.

Yes Office 2003 is slick and has tons of features but I haven't found one feature I actually use that isn't found in Open Office. No it's not as good as MS Office but it works. As for Internet Explorer 6, THAT is one thing I would not miss. It is technically an old browser with no real improvements since version 5.0.

Windows does have a larger driver base but then there is nothing I am running (DVD burner, TV Card, Compact Flash card reader, etc) that doesn't work right out of the box. Drivers for items I don't have don't matter to me. As to the fonts, I do have Clear Type fonts enabled on the Windows box but as you can see here a side by side comparison of anti aliasing with Windows and Linux. Although it's probably a wash between the two I prefer the Linux fonts.

Although it has no bearing on the desktop, Linux does have one big advantage as far as remote administration is concerned. As far as I know only one person at a time can log into a windows box. Linux can allow a host of people to log on simultaneously and yes safeguards are there to stop two people from modifying the same files at the same time. Again this is more of a benifit for servers but upgrades do not require a reboot unless you upgrade your kernel. That of course is the equivelent of upgrading from Windows 2000 to Windows XP. Speaking of updates, with my Mandrake, I can update my entire box with two simple commands "urpmi.update" and then "urpmi.update updates" This updates everything on my computer, the OS and all other files installed on the system. MS only updates the OS and seperately Office.

Finally and for me most significantly, Linux is absolutely free. I tend towards piracy as I suspect many here and elsewhere do. I have always felt uneasy basically stealing software and with Linux, I have yet to feel a need to pirate anything at all. Well maybe the occasional mp3 . Oh, it's also nice to run an FTP, Mail and two Web servers off the same box I type this message on.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 6:53:34 PM EST
My firewall and desktop machines currently run Slackware 9.1. I've been using Slackware since the 1.2 kernel. I've used Red Hat which is best referred to as Dead Rat. Red Hat patches everything which causes all sorts of problems and incompatabilities. I think Red Hat was trying to destroy Linux but it appears they have only destroyed themselves.

My desktop machine runs Linux kernel raid5, the firewall runs raid1.

My mail, web, database, and nameserver is running FreeBSD 4.9 (ports rocks). FBSD is a much more tightly integrated system with easy updates and installs of useful software from ports. I have had no problem installing from source for things not in ports, unlike red hat.

I have a spare/experimental machine (dual cpu PPro) that's running FreeBSD 5.2.1.
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 7:08:48 PM EST
have been waiting for the right time to start.

i've go the latest copy of lindows(linspire) and gentoo
which one should i try out?
Link Posted: 5/26/2004 7:43:50 PM EST
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