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4/22/2019 5:32:20 PM
Posted: 4/20/2016 8:33:08 PM EDT
Bought two apple trees tonight at Lowe's. Red and Golden Delicious. The Reds will be good for snacking and the Goldens for baking/cooking. Right now the saplings are about 7' high with inch thick trunks.

The research on the other varieties I was looking at were all in the 10'-15' height and diameter. However, the tags on these both say they'll grow to 20'-30 feet high and wide. Now they are going on either side of a cherry tree that is the same 30' wide and high...so the max of both are do-able. But if possible I'd like to keep these on the smaller side of what the tags say.

How can I do that? Pruning? Training the branches to certain directions or down?

They were priced so cheap compared to any of the nurseries in the area I'd hate to return them.

Thanks

-Emt1581
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:35:45 PM EDT
When they get to tall, yell at them.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:39:53 PM EDT
Google Dave Wilson Nursery.

See you next year.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:44:20 PM EDT
Prune them. If you want them to be ten feet high cut them off at ten feet. If you want 15 cut them at 15.

You won't kill them cutting on them. In fact if they don't have branches already or they are too high off the ground right now plant the tree and cut the main leader to about 36" above the ground. That will set your crotch low and get your branches started lower to the ground and get your fruit easier to reach.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:49:42 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By bondryan:
Prune them. If you want them to be ten feet high cut them off at ten feet. If you want 15 cut them at 15.

You won't kill them cutting on them. In fact if they don't have branches already or they are too high off the ground right now plant the tree and cut the main leader to about 36" above the ground. That will set your crotch low and get your branches started lower to the ground and get your fruit easier to reach.
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This. With careful pruning and bending key branches by tying them to stakes so they loop closer to the ground, you can keep a very productive tree to easily harvestable heights.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:50:13 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By NwG:
When they get to tall, yell at them.
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Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:52:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/20/2016 8:52:48 PM EDT by SilverSlinger]
Early, and correct pruning is key to a strong tree. Don't let it grow all gangly for 6 years and then decide to prune it. It must be done professionally (lots of good videos and articles online) from the get-go.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:55:45 PM EDT
Thanks for the info!

Now on the tag it says to prune when dormant....I'm guessing that means winter?

But yes, already finding vids.

Thanks again!

-Emt1581
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:11:02 PM EDT
20 to 30 feet? That means you have a full size rootstock like anoktova and you are going to have a hell of a time keeping it a manageable size.

The reason they were so cheap is because those varieties have lost their appeal, combined with a full sized rootstock are not in demand.

The good new is that they should be very hardy trees.

I have 5 coming in about a month, all bitter cider apple varieties. I'm very excited.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:12:38 PM EDT
but you wont get as many apples.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:15:32 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Thanks for the info!

Now on the tag it says to prune when dormant....I'm guessing that means winter?

But yes, already finding vids.

Thanks again!

-Emt1581
View Quote


The best way to stunt growth is prune in summer and winter. Winter only because its easier to see what youre doing.

At least thats what I do. But Im keeping mine at 7ft max.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:23:29 PM EDT
Red delicious??? Burn that fucking thing worst apples eva.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:33:35 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


The best way to stunt growth is prune in summer and winter. Winter only because its easier to see what youre doing.

At least thats what I do. But Im keeping mine at 7ft max.
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Thanks for the info!

Now on the tag it says to prune when dormant....I'm guessing that means winter?

But yes, already finding vids.

Thanks again!

-Emt1581


The best way to stunt growth is prune in summer and winter. Winter only because its easier to see what youre doing.

At least thats what I do. But Im keeping mine at 7ft max.


Dormant prunning will encourage growth. Every time you make a cut in the dormant season you encourage that branch to form new shoots from multiple buds. If you don't prune a branch during the dormant season it most likely won't break multiple limbs and will continue to grow as an extension of itself.

If you prune in the summer you will stunt the growth more. The closer you do it to fall, the more it will stunt the growth.

We cut probably 25-35% our new wood out every year.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:34:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By NwG:
When they get to tall, yell at them.
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Pretty sure this only works with clouds.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:34:49 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:


The best way to stunt growth is prune in summer and winter. Winter only because its easier to see what youre doing.

At least thats what I do. But Im keeping mine at 7ft max.
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Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By Emt1581:
Thanks for the info!

Now on the tag it says to prune when dormant....I'm guessing that means winter?

But yes, already finding vids.

Thanks again!

-Emt1581


The best way to stunt growth is prune in summer and winter. Winter only because its easier to see what youre doing.

At least thats what I do. But Im keeping mine at 7ft max.


Summer is at the end of the growing season, so they are headed towards dormancy. There is a slight chance you could harm the tree, but its not likely especially if it is healthy. Winter is the best time, but not the most pleasant cause of the weather.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:36:25 PM EDT
20-30' tall ? You may never see that in your lifetime.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:54:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By wildturkey09:
20 to 30 feet? That means you have a full size rootstock like anoktova and you are going to have a hell of a time keeping it a manageable size.

The reason they were so cheap is because those varieties have lost their appeal, combined with a full sized rootstock are not in demand.

The good new is that they should be very hardy trees.

I have 5 coming in about a month, all bitter cider apple varieties. I'm very excited.
View Quote


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:59:48 PM EDT
You can do it by spray or root pruning.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:04:44 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By deich:
Red delicious??? Burn that fucking thing worst apples eva.
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After they've been held in cold storage for half of forever, yeah.

Fresh off the tree is a whole different story.

My favorite apple variety is an old one, the Gravenstein...damned hard to find now.

Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:05:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/20/2016 10:08:56 PM EDT by PerfectTommy]
Protect the bark until it is big enough to defend its self on its own. I have jerk critters eating the bark on mine during the winter. Jerks. Oh yeah and something came through and munched all the new shoots off the top of one. Jerk. Makes me want to start bringing a drop knife out there in the hopes of catching one of these jerks messing wif me terees.

I have been buying a few apple trees every year in fall when they get discounted to like 8 bucks. I lopped them all off at 3ish feet. I have a whole herd of them now. I figure if I have enough, the critters cant kill them all and if they get too crazy I can have some fun chopping one down. Damn terees, but they do block the clouds.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:09:39 PM EDT
The usual method of restricting size is through grafting.... Instead of grafting stock onto a regular, full size root stock, its grafted onto semi-dwarf or dwarf root stocks. Its something done at nursery.

You can try pruning every year. Its going to be a chore. Cut all main leaders, and train downwards. Its a half assed approach. Unfortunately, you sorta have the wrong trees.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:20:41 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By PNWRN:


After they've been held in cold storage for half of forever, yeah.

Fresh off the tree is a whole different story.

My favorite apple variety is an old one, the Gravenstein...damned hard to find now.

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Originally Posted By PNWRN:
Originally Posted By deich:
Red delicious??? Burn that fucking thing worst apples eva.


After they've been held in cold storage for half of forever, yeah.

Fresh off the tree is a whole different story.

My favorite apple variety is an old one, the Gravenstein...damned hard to find now.



They actually being pretty big money selling them to fruit stands. They alternate bare really bad so on the down years they can go for $1000 per bin.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:21:42 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By CWO:
You can do it by spray or root pruning.
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He is going to have a tough time getting a hold of apogee or other pgrs without a private applicators license.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:21:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By PerfectTommy:
Protect the bark until it is big enough to defend its self on its own. I have jerk critters eating the bark on mine during the winter. Jerks. Oh yeah and something came through and munched all the new shoots off the top of one. Jerk. Makes me want to start bringing a drop knife out there in the hopes of catching one of these jerks messing wif me terees.

I have been buying a few apple trees every year in fall when they get discounted to like 8 bucks. I lopped them all off at 3ish feet. I have a whole herd of them now. I figure if I have enough, the critters cant kill them all and if they get too crazy I can have some fun chopping one down. Damn terees, but they do block the clouds.
View Quote


A couple years back a rabbit thought he was going to get the best of me in my garden. His hide is in my man cave and I made a meal out of the rest of him. Left his head on my wood pile for what I'm guessing were the neighborhood cats.

...it's amazing what you can accomplish with a suppressed 10/22 from inside a family room.

In the past several ground hogs made the mistake of thinking my veggie garden was their buffet. While I didn't eat them, they all drew their share of maggots. They spook much easier at close range so a window A/C needs to be used in order to mask movement and an ironing board works well for a bench rest in a bedroom.

Only ever caught deer munching once. They ran before I could line up the shot.

...so I've got some experience dealing with "jerks".

-Emt1581
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 1:42:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By munsen:


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By munsen:
Originally Posted By wildturkey09:
20 to 30 feet? That means you have a full size rootstock like anoktova and you are going to have a hell of a time keeping it a manageable size.

The reason they were so cheap is because those varieties have lost their appeal, combined with a full sized rootstock are not in demand.

The good new is that they should be very hardy trees.

I have 5 coming in about a month, all bitter cider apple varieties. I'm very excited.


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I'm getting Brown Snout, Yarlington Mills, Stoke Red , Bulmers Norman and Ellis Bitter. It's an experiment, I live in North Dakota and it is difficult to find varieties that do well in this cold climate so dwarfing rootstock is not an option. I've been using crabapples for bittering for years and while it works well it's a real pain in the ass to pick and process them.

Cider apples were very rare in the US up till about a decade ago but with the resurgence in cider they are available now. But they are in very high demand, all stock in the US is wiped out every spring, i ordered mine in January there weren't many left.

Here is a thread I made on making cider and the equipment I built for it. It took a couple thousand bucks to get fully set up but now I can make a ton of cider for next to nothing. https://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=171&t=1552458
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 1:43:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By munsen:


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By munsen:
Originally Posted By wildturkey09:
20 to 30 feet? That means you have a full size rootstock like anoktova and you are going to have a hell of a time keeping it a manageable size.

The reason they were so cheap is because those varieties have lost their appeal, combined with a full sized rootstock are not in demand.

The good new is that they should be very hardy trees.

I have 5 coming in about a month, all bitter cider apple varieties. I'm very excited.


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I'm getting Brown Snout, Yarlington Mills, Stoke Red , Bulmers Norman and Ellis Bitter. It's an experiment, I live in North Dakota and it is difficult to find varieties that do well in this cold climate so dwarfing rootstock is not an option. I've been using crabapples for bittering for years and while it works well it's a real pain in the ass to pick and process them.

Cider apples were very rare in the US up till about a decade ago but with the resurgence in cider they are available now. But they are in very high demand, all stock in the US is wiped out every spring, i ordered mine in January there weren't many left.

Here is a thread I made on making cider and the equipment I built for it. It took a couple thousand bucks to get fully set up but now I can make a ton of cider for next to nothing. https://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=171&t=1552458
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 1:56:30 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By OverScoped:
but you wont get as many apples.
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Sure you will. If you prune the correctly. Commercial apple production is now only growing their trees to be 8 feet tall so that a person on a step ladder can harvest.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 1:57:48 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By frozenny:
The usual method of restricting size is through grafting.... Instead of grafting stock onto a regular, full size root stock, its grafted onto semi-dwarf or dwarf root stocks. Its something done at nursery.

You can try pruning every year. Its going to be a chore. Cut all main leaders, and train downwards. Its a half assed approach. Unfortunately, you sorta have the wrong trees.
View Quote


This exactly, find a nursery that sells trees to orchards and get the varieties you want on a dwarfing root stock, or if you are ambitious buy dwarfing root stock and get friendly with someone with an orchard and get some scionwood (or I guess you could order it) and make trees with several varieties by grafting or budding...
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 3:27:38 PM EDT
Prune them so you can throw a cat through the branches without touching them.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 3:33:38 PM EDT
I'm sorry you bought trees that produce the worst tasting apples ever devised.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 3:39:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/21/2016 3:40:11 PM EDT by akrado]
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Originally Posted By jungatheart:
Prune them so you can throw a cat through the branches without touching them.
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What horticulture school did you go to? I"d like to have been there on that lab day.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 3:57:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By DRich:


Pretty sure this only works with clouds.
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Originally Posted By DRich:
Originally Posted By NwG:
When they get to tall, yell at them.


Pretty sure this only works with clouds.

Didn't work with my son
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 4:07:41 PM EDT
We got 2 semi-dwarf red delicious in our back yard. Suppose to only grow to 12-14' max. They are now around 5yr old and last year they finally started to give an abundant crop, until the trees contacted cedar rust. Apples were picked off and given to cattle and all fruit trees/bushes sprayed down.

This year the trees are looking great and starting to bulb out with fruit after the bees pollinated.

We also have a "old fashioned"(don't know type--red fruit) apple tree that had finally died off after 50+yrs and about 3 years ago I saw a new apple tree branch growing up from the stump root. I nursed it with lots of water to make sure it's roots didn't die out during drought.

It requires an old fashioned type apple tree to be within 1 mile to help germinate the hybrids, which I believe the delicious variety are.

I now live in the home I grew up in when my Grandparents bought the farm back in 1960. 3rd generation on this property.

This fall we plant Peach trees.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 4:17:56 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Triumphman:
We got 2 semi-dwarf red delicious in our back yard. Suppose to only grow to 12-14' max. They are now around 5yr old and last year they finally started to give an abundant crop, until the trees contacted cedar rust. Apples were picked off and given to cattle and all fruit trees/bushes sprayed down.

This year the trees are looking great and starting to bulb out with fruit after the bees pollinated.

We also have a "old fashioned"(don't know type--red fruit) apple tree that had finally died off after 50+yrs and about 3 years ago I saw a new apple tree branch growing up from the stump root. I nursed it with lots of water to make sure it's roots didn't die out during drought.

It requires an old fashioned type apple tree to be within 1 mile to help germinate the hybrids, which I believe the delicious variety are.

I now live in the home I grew up in when my Grandparents bought the farm back in 1960. 3rd generation on this property.

This fall we plant Peach trees.
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Your tree that died off then came back probably won't won't be growing the same apples, the new shoot is most likely from the rootstock and you will end up with a crab of some sort.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 4:33:20 PM EDT
You should have gone for a dwarf or semi-drawf variety instead of the full size. If you stay on top of managing them while they're dormant you can probably keep them small though.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 5:37:08 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildturkey09:


I'm getting Brown Snout, Yarlington Mills, Stoke Red , Bulmers Norman and Ellis Bitter. It's an experiment, I live in North Dakota and it is difficult to find varieties that do well in this cold climate so dwarfing rootstock is not an option. I've been using crabapples for bittering for years and while it works well it's a real pain in the ass to pick and process them.

Cider apples were very rare in the US up till about a decade ago but with the resurgence in cider they are available now. But they are in very high demand, all stock in the US is wiped out every spring, i ordered mine in January there weren't many left.

Here is a thread I made on making cider and the equipment I built for it. It took a couple thousand bucks to get fully set up but now I can make a ton of cider for next to nothing. https://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=171&t=1552458
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Originally Posted By wildturkey09:
Originally Posted By munsen:
Originally Posted By wildturkey09:
20 to 30 feet? That means you have a full size rootstock like anoktova and you are going to have a hell of a time keeping it a manageable size.

The reason they were so cheap is because those varieties have lost their appeal, combined with a full sized rootstock are not in demand.

The good new is that they should be very hardy trees.

I have 5 coming in about a month, all bitter cider apple varieties. I'm very excited.


Cool, which varieties? I read that cider apples were all but extinct here in the US. Very few people grow them.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I'm getting Brown Snout, Yarlington Mills, Stoke Red , Bulmers Norman and Ellis Bitter. It's an experiment, I live in North Dakota and it is difficult to find varieties that do well in this cold climate so dwarfing rootstock is not an option. I've been using crabapples for bittering for years and while it works well it's a real pain in the ass to pick and process them.

Cider apples were very rare in the US up till about a decade ago but with the resurgence in cider they are available now. But they are in very high demand, all stock in the US is wiped out every spring, i ordered mine in January there weren't many left.

Here is a thread I made on making cider and the equipment I built for it. It took a couple thousand bucks to get fully set up but now I can make a ton of cider for next to nothing. https://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=171&t=1552458


Oh hey, I remember that thread. That is damn awesome.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 5:46:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/22/2016 5:48:44 AM EDT by Con-Sol]
I just bought 3 sweet cherries, two types of peach and two types of pear along with 6 different varieties of muscadine grapes.

Been digging holes is SC red clay for three days now...sucks!

I did go with dwarf and semi dwarf root stock because I fell out of a 50' pear tree in Portland OR as a young kid.

I see lots of heavy pruning in OP's future.

ETA: I would not buy any fruit trees from the big box stores, I like Stark Bro's nursery.
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