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Posted: 8/10/2011 11:13:31 PM EDT
Say I have enough money for a downpayment of 75-95% down on a home, but I have bad credit. Is it possible to still get a mortgage/loan for the remaining 25%?



Just curious what my options would be in such a situation. And before you suggest paying off any collections etc, and clearing up my credit... all my debts are paid.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:15:39 PM EDT
[#1]
I'd say you can.

But then again, if you have so much cash, why couldn't you pay your bills?
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:17:47 PM EDT
[#2]
Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:19:41 PM EDT
[#3]



Quoted:


Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.


That's probabl what I would do. Around here that extra 25 percent can be solved by buying a house ten miles farther out from the city center in many cases.  Or a few miles closer if you don't mind the crime.



 
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:26:20 PM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:
Say I have enough money for a downpayment of 75-95% down on a home, but I have bad credit. Is it possible to still get a mortgage/loan for the remaining 25%?

Just curious what my options would be in such a situation. And before you suggest paying off any collections etc, and clearing up my credit... all my debts are paid.

A cousin of mine was in the same boat and ended up paying high interest rates in jersey. Your best bet is to save up some more money and make an offer on a slightly cheaper home. If you have 90% I would go ahead and make an offer you never know when someone will bite.

Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:41:42 PM EDT
[#5]



Quoted:


I'd say you can.



But then again, if you have so much cash, why couldn't you pay your bills?
Most of those bills were from before I had this huge cash settlement. I paid off most of them (that I was aware of at the time), and later paid off the rest when I became aware of them (those were tiny bills for $50 - $100).



Then I bought a house with my settlement. Eventually I came on hard times, had to go to the ER for something, and I racked up quite a bill that I had to work on for a while to get paid off. Again, all my shit is paid.



My credit doesn't get any better since I don't use credit for anything. So while I have bad stuff from years ago, it doesn't have a chance to improve since I don't borrow money unless its 100% necessary (medical etc).
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:43:00 PM EDT
[#6]





Quoted:



Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.



Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?


 
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:46:04 PM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.

Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  


Make an offer. I bet (esp. in this market) that they'll bite.

You might sweeten the deal a bit by offering to pay closing costs. Offer 58K and offer to pay costs.

eta

The underlying principle regarding loaning money is RISK. If you have paid $60k on a $65k house, how much risk will the bank assume if they give you the $5K loan? Not much.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:46:52 PM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.

Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  


I think most anyone (bank wise) would float you 5k on a house...but don't think they would actually mortgage that low of an amount.

Would an offer of 60k get that house?

Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:49:58 PM EDT
[#9]
Ok so I checked my credit report. I have 4 collections. Though two of them are for the SAME DAMN THING. They just split the bill, and have it listed twice. THOSE BASTARDS! IT WAS ONLY ONE LOAN!


It was a loan that was late, apparently. I might have to call the CRAs and find out why the hell it shows as two different accounts when it was only really one. That was for a student loan.

The other one was for a medical bill, and the other was some small ass termination fee I was unaware of from an ISP back in NJ...and they never really mailed me at my WY Addresses. Paid it as soon as I learned of it.





Aside from that... nothing else apparently.

All of it is also listed as Paid.

 
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:53:23 PM EDT
[#10]
Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 11:57:30 PM EDT
[#11]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:

Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.


Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  




Make an offer. I bet (esp. in this market) that they'll bite.



You might sweeten the deal a bit by offering to pay closing costs. Offer 58K and offer to pay costs.



eta



The underlying principle regarding loaning money is RISK. If you have paid $60k on a $65k house, how much risk will the bank assume if they give you the $5K loan? Not much.
Not with foreclosures (which is the bulk of houses im looking at). Most of them, I will have to go into a bidding war over. Their list price will actually be the "starting bid" in practice, and WILL sell over list price. There are some short sales I can try, but I don't like the idea of being "locked in" and having to wait a long time only to find out the offer is rejected.















 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:00:54 AM EDT
[#12]





Quoted:





Quoted:
Quoted:


Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.



Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  






I think most anyone (bank wise) would float you 5k on a house...but don't think they would actually mortgage that low of an amount.





Would an offer of 60k get that house?








I just want to know what my options are, what loans I can get to get me in a better price range of houses... though I'd *LOVE* to avoid a loan if I can help it. It just depends on how much my house sells for.


 



Also, I was told by someone here that oftentimes... even if my bid is lower, sometimes they might accept mine over someone who needs financing... since "cash in hand" is a more attractive buyer than "Wait a month, and I'll have the financing processed".
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:06:52 AM EDT
[#13]
I want to clarify. I have little to no intention on getting a loan, IF I CAN AVOID IT, and still get a DECENT home in a DECENT neighborhood. No I don't mean ARFCom decent either... (which would be a half a million dollar mcmansion with a nuclear missile silo under the garage) I mean, decent for me. My standards are no where as high as some of the pampered people here on ARFCom.





Just want a house that is livable, decent looking (IE, not a former crack house), and in a neighborhood where not every other house is a gang hang out.











By looking at real estate websites, my price range does afford some decent houses. So, assuming I get close to what I want for my house... I should be good. I just want to explore my options in case I end up selling my house for bigger loss than I'm currently expecting.


 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:08:33 AM EDT
[#14]
Find a cheaper house?
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:10:39 AM EDT
[#15]



Quoted:


Find a cheaper house?


At my current price range, I think I should be good. But if I go too much below it, begin to get "priced out" of the market... at least as far as buying free and clear goes. I anticipate getting enough money to stay in my current price range. I just want to know what I can do in a worst case scenario.

 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:19:00 AM EDT
[#16]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:

Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.


Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  




I think most anyone (bank wise) would float you 5k on a house...but don't think they would actually mortgage that low of an amount.



Would an offer of 60k get that house?



So I guess it would be a conventional loan?





 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:21:21 AM EDT
[#17]



Quoted:


Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?




If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?





 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:26:33 AM EDT
[#18]



Quoted:





Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?




If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?



 


You have no idea what they'd say to a conventional mortgage.



Find out, then ask questions.



If you have verifiable income and no debt, I don't think paid shit in the past is going to pose a problem. AT ALL.



Wrist wringing for nothing.





 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:46:19 AM EDT
[#19]



Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?




If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?



 


You have no idea what they'd say to a conventional mortgage.



Find out, then ask questions.



If you have verifiable income and no debt, I don't think paid shit in the past is going to pose a problem. AT ALL.



Wrist wringing for nothing.



 
So lets say I do 20% down, then over the next 6 months, I pay off 70%. Leaving the 10% I actually needed help for. Could I then refinance, so I can get a lower monthly minimum payment? That way, I continue paying as much as I can, but then gain the ability to revert to a low monthly payment in times of hardship?

 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:56:01 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:
Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...


And see what they say?


You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?

If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.


If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.

After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 12:58:35 AM EDT
[#21]



Quoted:



Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.




If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.



After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.


Someone told me that when you do a downpayment of 50% or more... they don't even bother to check your credit, since the debt you'd owe would be secured by your home.

 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 1:30:36 AM EDT
[#22]
If you go to a hard money lender, you can probably get a loan.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 2:28:15 AM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...


And see what they say?


You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?


If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?

 

You have no idea what they'd say to a conventional mortgage.

Find out, then ask questions.

If you have verifiable income and no debt, I don't think paid shit in the past is going to pose a problem. AT ALL.

Wrist wringing for nothing.

 
So lets say I do 20% down, then over the next 6 months, I pay off 70%. Leaving the 10% I actually needed help for. Could I then refinance, so I can get a lower monthly minimum payment? That way, I continue paying as much as I can, but then gain the ability to revert to a low monthly payment in times of hardship?  


Dude, your $60k house is gonna cost you $200k.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 2:31:02 AM EDT
[#24]



Quoted:



Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.




If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.



After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.


I like the sound of that.



This is the sort of thing I would expect the bank to lay out for me.





 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 2:55:51 AM EDT
[#25]
Quoted:
Ok so I checked my credit report. I have 4 collections. Though two of them are for the SAME DAMN THING. They just split the bill, and have it listed twice. THOSE BASTARDS! IT WAS ONLY ONE LOAN!
It was a loan that was late, apparently. I might have to call the CRAs and find out why the hell it shows as two different accounts when it was only really one. That was for a student loan.
The other one was for a medical bill, and the other was some small ass termination fee I was unaware of from an ISP back in NJ...and they never really mailed me at my WY Addresses. Paid it as soon as I learned of it.

Aside from that... nothing else apparently.
All of it is also listed as Paid.
 


There's some sort of procedure for adding statements or requesting corrections or updates on past collections that will get some of those items removed.  I think you send a request to the credit bureau but you should check into that.  Or, you can wait for 7 years, (I think), and those paid debts will fall off anyway.  That's how I first got my credit straightened out.

I'd go to small local banks to check about the loan.  If I knew you and you had a 90% down payment, I'd gladly loan you the difference.  I'd think you could surely get a loan with a 50% or better down payment.  If not, then maybe you could find a co signor.

Link Posted: 8/11/2011 3:11:36 AM EDT
[#26]
I would go to the bank,tell the loan person you want to buy a $100k range house and put $50k down on it. Then ask what do "they own" that's in that price range.

I think a loan officer would be all over that. Everything would be handled in house. Plus they get a home sold that THEY own (are stuck with at the moment).

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 3:31:41 AM EDT
[#27]
Quoted:
Ok so I checked my credit report. I have 4 collections. Though two of them are for the SAME DAMN THING. They just split the bill, and have it listed twice. THOSE BASTARDS! IT WAS ONLY ONE LOAN!
It was a loan that was late, apparently. I might have to call the CRAs and find out why the hell it shows as two different accounts when it was only really one. That was for a student loan.
The other one was for a medical bill, and the other was some small ass termination fee I was unaware of from an ISP back in NJ...and they never really mailed me at my WY Addresses. Paid it as soon as I learned of it.

Aside from that... nothing else apparently.
All of it is also listed as Paid.
 


If they are all paid, you need to dispute every derogatory account.  They have 30 days to respond and confirm the debt, or it is removed from your credit report.  Many companies don't bother confirming it if it is paid.  Some don't even do it if it is outstanding.

The first thing a person with bad credit should do is payoff all debts and dispute every negative item.  It is step one on the road to recovery.  You are half way there, and in a month you could improve your score significantly depending on how much stuff comes off.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 3:41:57 AM EDT
[#28]
Quoted:
Ok so I checked my credit report. I have 4 collections. Though two of them are for the SAME DAMN THING. They just split the bill, and have it listed twice. THOSE BASTARDS! IT WAS ONLY ONE LOAN!
It was a loan that was late, apparently. I might have to call the CRAs and find out why the hell it shows as two different accounts when it was only really one. That was for a student loan.
The other one was for a medical bill, and the other was some small ass termination fee I was unaware of from an ISP back in NJ...and they never really mailed me at my WY Addresses. Paid it as soon as I learned of it.

Aside from that... nothing else apparently.
All of it is also listed as Paid.
 


Print that list out, write your comments on it, briefly explaining that it was paid.
The bank will see that list anyway.

Take this to a smaller, local bank and ask about your options for a loan.  You should be able to easily get financing on a reasonable house, if you appear to have your ducks in a row.

If you're concerned about a high interest rate, make extra payments toward the principle early on.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 3:48:14 AM EDT
[#29]
Try filling out one of those Pre qualifications, you might be surprised what they could do with the amount of cash you have. I personally wouldn't empty my savings for a house. Maybe 50% down then stash the rest of the cash for a rainy day or SHTF.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 4:13:22 AM EDT
[#30]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...


And see what they say?


You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?

If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.


If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.

After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.

Someone told me that when you do a downpayment of 50% or more... they don't even bother to check your credit, since the debt you'd owe would be secured by your home.  

Not true- we did 60% down on a purchase 10 years ago- they still make you jump through the hoops- You just need to get extremely aggressive with your offers- in today's market an offer of $60,000 on an asking price of 65k is NOT unreasonable- I'd be zinging 'em with an offer of say, 56K, 2.5K refundable earnest money, 50/50 split on closing costs, with 12 hours to respond to offer.
The house we bought w/ 60% down (still in it) was on the market at 280K, but had been empty 2 years and was an inheritance given to an out of state owner (We found all this out- Not our agent- and we didn't let her know what we knew until the deal closed)- we offered 210K "as is", 50/50 on closing costs, 5k earnest $, AND contingent on sale of our existing house- had to gamble here, and made the earnest $ non-refundable to "sweeten the deal"- end result- 45 days later we were in our new place- Even with the crappy market now, we bought it so right, we can under-cut the market in our area and still make a nice profit if we need to move.
Agression- it works, and you've got more than enough cash to get aggressive.
Good Luck on your new house!


Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:28:50 AM EDT
[#31]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:




Quoted:




Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?




If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?



 


You have no idea what they'd say to a conventional mortgage.



Find out, then ask questions.



If you have verifiable income and no debt, I don't think paid shit in the past is going to pose a problem. AT ALL.



Wrist wringing for nothing.



 
So lets say I do 20% down, then over the next 6 months, I pay off 70%. Leaving the 10% I actually needed help for. Could I then refinance, so I can get a lower monthly minimum payment? That way, I continue paying as much as I can, but then gain the ability to revert to a low monthly payment in times of hardship?  




Dude, your $60k house is gonna cost you $200k.


Not if I paid it off in 5 years.



After 6 months, I'd only owe like 10% of the house value. If I refinanced, I'd be able to revert to lower payments if something bad happens... but instead I'd just keep making huge payments.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:29:47 AM EDT
[#32]
Were I a lender, this would raise *huge* red flags.  YMMV
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:31:47 AM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.

Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  


You dont. You tell the seller to drop the price 5k and you'll give them cash.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:35:25 AM EDT
[#34]



Quoted:





Quoted:


Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.




If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.



After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.


Someone told me that when you do a downpayment of 50% or more... they don't even bother to check your credit, since the debt you'd owe would be secured by your home.  


That's not necessarily true.  We put about 75% down on our home six years ago and they did check our credit.  Like you our credit wasn't spotless, but we still ended up with a pretty good interest rate (for six years ago).  



I don't know what they would do with the amount you are talking about.  Do you have a car you could refinance?



 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:41:29 AM EDT
[#35]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...


And see what they say?


You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?


If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.
What do you mean by this?

 

You have no idea what they'd say to a conventional mortgage.

Find out, then ask questions.

If you have verifiable income and no debt, I don't think paid shit in the past is going to pose a problem. AT ALL.

Wrist wringing for nothing.

 
So lets say I do 20% down, then over the next 6 months, I pay off 70%. Leaving the 10% I actually needed help for. Could I then refinance, so I can get a lower monthly minimum payment? That way, I continue paying as much as I can, but then gain the ability to revert to a low monthly payment in times of hardship?  


Dude, your $60k house is gonna cost you $200k.


How do you figure that?  He's putting $13K down, borrowing $52K, and paying off $45.5K in 6 months, leaving him with an outstanding debt on the house of $6.5K...

Pretty sure he's not paying $200K anywhere in there....


OP - You need to offer like $55K cash.  It's hard to turn that kind of in the hand money down...
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:45:52 AM EDT
[#36]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:
Just pay cash for 75%-95% of the value of what your looking at now. Then you'll have no mortgage.

Well lets say a specific house is 65K, and I have 60K. How can I cover the difference?  


Make an offer. I bet (esp. in this market) that they'll bite.

You might sweeten the deal a bit by offering to pay closing costs. Offer 58K and offer to pay costs.

eta

The underlying principle regarding loaning money is RISK. If you have paid $60k on a $65k house, how much risk will the bank assume if they give you the $5K loan? Not much.


Honestly if I had a house I was selling for 65k, and some guy offered to bring me a suitcase full of cash to the tune of 60k, I'd probably take it and sign the paperwork over to him.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:49:52 AM EDT
[#37]



Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:


Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.




If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.



After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.


Someone told me that when you do a downpayment of 50% or more... they don't even bother to check your credit, since the debt you'd owe would be secured by your home.  


That's not necessarily true.  We put about 75% down on our home six years ago and they did check our credit.  Like you our credit wasn't spotless, but we still ended up with a pretty good interest rate (for six years ago).  



I don't know what they would do with the amount you are talking about.  Do you have a car you could refinance?

 
No. I don't. My car is free and clear owned.





 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 11:58:46 AM EDT
[#38]
Spend $19.95 at MyFico.com and get you credit score. Talk to a bank about pre-qualifying for a loan. They can let you know what is available as far as loans.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:39:26 PM EDT
[#39]



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:


Quoted:

Why don't you tell the bank you have 20% down and you want to buy the $65K house...





And see what they say?





You're pre-rejected before you've even been to a bank about this?



If they approve you with 20% down, then make larger payments and be done with it as convenient.




If you get the loan, you can put the $65k into a separate account which the bank automatically withdraws from.



After a year or so (after you've establish a good credit history),  you pay it off.


Someone told me that when you do a downpayment of 50% or more... they don't even bother to check your credit, since the debt you'd owe would be secured by your home.  


Not true- we did 60% down on a purchase 10 years ago- they still make you jump through the hoops- You just need to get extremely aggressive with your offers- in today's market an offer of $60,000 on an asking price of 65k is NOT unreasonable- I'd be zinging 'em with an offer of say, 56K, 2.5K refundable earnest money, 50/50 split on closing costs, with 12 hours to respond to offer.

The house we bought w/ 60% down (still in it) was on the market at 280K, but had been empty 2 years and was an inheritance given to an out of state owner (We found all this out- Not our agent- and we didn't let her know what we knew until the deal closed)- we offered 210K "as is", 50/50 on closing costs, 5k earnest $, AND contingent on sale of our existing house- had to gamble here, and made the earnest $ non-refundable to "sweeten the deal"- end result- 45 days later we were in our new place- Even with the crappy market now, we bought it so right, we can under-cut the market in our area and still make a nice profit if we need to move.

Agression- it works, and you've got more than enough cash to get aggressive.

Good Luck on your new house!





plus CASH NOW has an appeal all it's own.  makes some offers and see what happens





 
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