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Posted: 3/7/2015 5:30:43 PM EDT
My mom recently gave me a sour dough starter, since I have fond memories of her making sour dough bread when I was a little kid, and I wanted to make some

Couple of issues with it though:

1. I follow the king arthur instructions for feeding it. 1 cup flower, 1/2 cup warm water. The consistency is like glue. Can I just add more water to thin it out?

2. I tried to make a basic sour dough bread recipe (again, king arthur) and it was EXTREMELY dry. It said add all ingredients at once (including 5 cups of flour) and mix. I think it was so dry because the sour dough starter was so damn thick. It was too dry to do anything with the dough and I ended up dumping the batch

3. I tried again two days later, after feeding it. This time, I added some more water and added the flour slowly. Ended up getting to 4 cups of flour (recipe called for 6) before the dough got to the right consistency. Rolled with it, formed it into loaves, and put it into the oven and it baked very oddly. It rose straight up, like it was in a bread pan, instead of evenly. I'm not sure there if I mixed the dough enough or not, but it felt like I mixed it for long enough. I'm going to let it cool for a few hours then try it out (learned my lesson as a child to not eat bread fresh out of the oven )

Any help, tips, tricks, or recipes to try, I'm all ears
Link Posted: 3/8/2015 10:20:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/8/2015 10:23:38 AM EDT by watercat]
When I feed mine, for every 1 cup of starter that I remove, I add 1 cup of bread flour and 2/3 cup warm water. I occasionally increase the water to 3/4 cup if the consistency is too thick, but that doesn't happen very often. The consistency of the starter is thicker if it's cold (from the fridge). I don't have a good comparison for what mine is like...a slightly melted milkshake? except that it's sticky and not smooth...

I store mine in the fridge until I want to make something. If I think about it soon enough, I'll take the starter out early to warm up, because it's easier to stir when it's room-temperature.

Here are some of my favorite recipes to make with the starter:


Soft Sourdough Bread
You can use all bread flour for a lighter bread, or the whole wheat for a different flavor.

½ c. bread flour
1 ½ Tbsp. white sugar
1 ¼ tsp. salt
1 ¼ tsp. active dry yeast
½ c. warm milk
1 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 c. sourdough starter
½ c. + ? c. bread flour
1 c. + 1 T. whole wheat flour

In a large bowl, combine ½ c. bread flour, sugar, salt, and dry yeast. Add milk and softened butter. Stir in starter. Mix in remaining flour gradually; you may need more depending on humidity.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface, and knead for 8 to 10 minutes. Place in a buttered loaf pan, turn once to oil surface, and cover. Allow to rise for 1 hour, or until doubled in volume.

Shape into loaf. Allow to rise for 1 hour, or until doubled.

Bake at 375°F for 30 minutes, or until done.

Remove from the pan to a wire rack. I wrap it in a towel so that the moisture will be trapped and soften the crust.

View Quote




Sourdough Crackers

1 cup "discarded” sourdough starter
¼ cup room temperature lard from pastured pork (or coconut oil or softened butter)
1 cup whole wheat or spelt flour, or as much as you need to make a stiff dough
½ tsp. salt
Olive oil for brushing
**seasoned salt is best** Coarse salt, garlic, Italian seasoning, etc. for sprinkling on top
**roll to about ?”**

In a large bowl, combine the sourdough and the lard and mix thoroughly. Mix the salt in with ¼ cup flour and add to the sourdough mixture. Knead it all together in the bowl, adding as much flour as necessary to make a stiff dough. Cover the dough with plastic wrap or put a lid on the bowl to prevent it from drying out. Leave the dough at room temperature for at least seven hours.

Seven or more hours later, preheat the oven to 350°.

Take a portion of the dough (about 1 cup fits on my large cookie sheet) and roll it out in between 2 pieces of parchment paper, until it is very thin, about 1/8 inch. Pour a little bit of olive oil on the rolled out dough and spread it to the edges of the dough with a pastry brush or your hand. Sprinkle liberally with coarse salt or topping of choice. Cut the dough vertically and horizontally into quadrangles with a pizza cutter. Transfer the parchment paper onto cookie sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes or until just golden brown. Repeat in batches.

For extra crispy crackers, turn the oven off with the crackers still inside. They’ll crisp up as it cools down. NOTE: Do not use this method with an electric oven, as it will still create heat even once turned off. You’d have to let quite a bit of heat out by leaving the door open for a few minutes, then check the crackers every 10 minutes or so until they’re crispy but not burnt.

View Quote




Sourdough Waffles
The starter is used for flavor, so a starter from the fridge or a fiercely bubbling starter on the counter, or a new starter that's not quite ready—they're all just as good.

Makes 8 standard 4 ½-inch square waffles – 2 full-size waffles on our waffle-iron.

1 cup all purpose flour
1 ½ tsp. baking powder
2 Tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2 eggs
½ cup milk
8 ounces sourdough starter
3 Tbsp. butter, melted

In medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Whisk until well combined.

In separate medium bowl, whisk eggs and milk until combined. Add sourdough starter and whisk until completely blended. Add flour mixture and butter and stir until combined. Depending on thickness of starter, you might need to adjust batter. It should be the consistency of pancake batter. Add flour or milk as needed to reach that consistency.

Cook in waffle iron according to manufacturer's directions.

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Link Posted: 3/9/2015 10:00:04 AM EDT
I am definitely going to try the sourdough waffles

Slightly melted milkshake is a good comparison. My mom said hers is like a thick soup. I suppose I'll try adding some water gradually and see if that helps.

How does sour dough do in a bread machine? I was offered one for free, but had no use for it
Link Posted: 3/9/2015 12:53:24 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sev89:
I am definitely going to try the sourdough waffles

Slightly melted milkshake is a good comparison. My mom said hers is like a thick soup. I suppose I'll try adding some water gradually and see if that helps.

How does sour dough do in a bread machine? I was offered one for free, but had no use for it
View Quote
Sourdough waffles are the only waffles I make now.

I don't know about the bread machine. I don't have one.
Link Posted: 3/9/2015 4:18:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sev89:
I am definitely going to try the sourdough waffles

Slightly melted milkshake is a good comparison. My mom said hers is like a thick soup. I suppose I'll try adding some water gradually and see if that helps.

How does sour dough do in a bread machine? I was offered one for free, but had no use for it
View Quote


I use my machine for pizza dough. Sooo simple and much cheaper than delivery.
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