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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/7/2006 7:47:17 PM EDT
I don't know why but I've always liked them. Any recommendations for a good RV - the stealthier the better (neaming it doesn't scream RV!! in the parking lot).
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 7:49:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WMW:
the stealthier the better (neaming it doesn't scream RV!! in the parking lot).



what?
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 7:50:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 7:52:35 PM EDT by DeadSled]
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 10:24:52 PM EDT
Does the hot Russian chick you want to date dig RV's?
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 11:09:48 PM EDT
Motorhomes have the highest overall cost of ownership, by far. Essentially, you're buying all the elements of a large motor vehicle, along with all the elements of a large travel trailer. The running gear is expensive to buy (particularly for diesel models), and uses expensive replacement parts. For example, a set of replacement tires can easily run $1500. Some of the running gear parts (brakes, fuel system, batteries, tires) will require routine maintenance or replacement even when the motorhome isn't being driven.

Also, there is the disadvantage of having the living quarters permanently attached to the running gear: If you ever have a mechanical breakdown while on the trip, the entire RV goes into the service bay (and you spend the night in a motel).

BOTTOM LINE: A travel trailer or 5th wheel trailer makes a lot more financial sense, particularly if you already own a beefy 1/2- or 3/4-ton pickup to pull it.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 3:59:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 4:01:45 AM EDT by entropy]
I have a 37 foot motorhome, and I will concur on the cost of ownership comment. I would have been better off to buy a travel trailer than a motorhome, as you have to worry about two engines (your normal truck, and the RV)

It is roomy and comfortable however. Powered by a carbed Ford 460. Sucks gas like crazy. 6 MPG with a tailwind, downhill, if I'm lucky.

The good part is that it is pretty delf sufficient, built in Genset, uses the 90 gal gas tank, and it will carry a lot of crap in it, and towed behind it.




Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:08:22 AM EDT
I've often wondered about having one of these (or perhaps a smaller variant), but I can't shake the idea that if I'm going on vacation, the last thing I want to be doing is cooking and cleaning.

I can stay at many a fine hotel (clean, comfortable; not Four Seasons) and eat out for what one of those costs in itself as well as gas and maintenance and my own time.

Am I that far off?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:55:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
I've often wondered about having one of these (or perhaps a smaller variant), but I can't shake the idea that if I'm going on vacation, the last thing I want to be doing is cooking and cleaning.

I can stay at many a fine hotel (clean, comfortable; not Four Seasons) and eat out for what one of those costs in itself as well as gas and maintenance and my own time.

Am I that far off?



Kids. Camping. Woods. Wife needs something with a thermostat, but loves being "out" in the woods.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:10:54 PM EDT
i prefer a travel trailer that way you don't have to maintain another engine.

i wont stay in hotel except as a last resort, you do realize they only change sheets not the covers. bring your own.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:22:29 PM EDT
We had a Motorhome when the chillins' were home. As a kid our family also travelled via motorhomes and travel trailers.

It can't be beat!

If you want to try it on for size, rent either or both for a week or two and see which suits you best.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:34:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 1:35:06 PM EDT by LARRYG]
Funny this subject would come up.

I am currently considering buying this:



Granted, it's not a big or nice as that motorhome, but it does have a shower, cooking, 3-way fridge (gas,12 volt, 110), toilet, heavy duty power cable, AC, heat, and a fresh water tank.

I am tired of sleeping in tents at Sebring.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:39:25 PM EDT
Hotel/motel = $40-80 per night & free breakfast
reliable RV = $40-80k plus maintence/fees & gas

That's about a thousand nites on vacation before ya break even.

So if you're not retiring for a three year tour, it might not be worth it. Wake up late, eat the free breakfast, take a long shower and drive out to the event/park. Enjoy the day, then back for pizza delivered to your room, HBO, sauna, pool, and a good night's sleep in a big comfy bed.

'Course if you're going hunting, a trailer or cabin gets you to the stand early.





Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:44:29 PM EDT
Spyda, nowadays I spend far more nights in motels than RV's, but motelling it is just "travel".

RV'ing is a total "experience"
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:46:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Spyda:
Hotel/motel = $40-80 per night & free breakfast
reliable RV = $40-80k plus maintence/fees & gas

That's about a thousand nites on vacation before ya break even.

So if you're not retiring for a three year tour, it might not be worth it. Wake up late, eat the free breakfast, take a long shower and drive out to the event/park. Enjoy the day, then back for pizza delivered to your room, HBO, sauna, pool, and a good night's sleep in a big comfy bed.

'Course if you're going hunting, a trailer or cabin gets you to the stand early.





Of course I don't get get all of those old crusty jiz and ass-rub stains on my trailer beds like one might in a fine hotel.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:48:03 PM EDT
A page with my home away from home a Flagstaff 831RLSS

Flagstaff 831RLSS

While the travel trailer is large it offers 4 people alot of room or 6 peoplea nice place to sleep. We keep ours fully stocked like a second home.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:48:32 PM EDT
Heheh,

Yeah, you're right there. Guess each to his own. When I considered the amount of time in setting up and tearing down, motels got the nod. But nothing beats a meal by the campfire, huh?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:48:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 1:59:50 PM EDT by Zippy_The_Wonderdog]
Might I suggest an EM-50?



...and more screen captures from it's sales video...



hobnobbing with the locals in E. Europe....(I hear it's kinda like Wisconsin...)



Spacious interior with tasteful tactical de'cor...




(my mother went to High School with and knew Harold Ramis, fwiw...)
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:22:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
I've often wondered about having one of these (or perhaps a smaller variant), but I can't shake the idea that if I'm going on vacation, the last thing I want to be doing is cooking and cleaning.

I can stay at many a fine hotel (clean, comfortable; not Four Seasons) and eat out for what one of those costs in itself as well as gas and maintenance and my own time.

Am I that far off?



That's a pretty accurate assessment, if you're only planning on using it for short, occasional vacations.

However, some folks who travel a lot get tired of not waking up in their own bed, not being surrounded by their own things, not eating home-cooked food, not being to watch their favorite DVDs on a large-screen TV or listen to their favorite music on a good stereo system, etc.

Also, the average campground or RV resort is a lot better place to get a good night's sleep than the average hotel room - No banging doors, flushing toilets, noisy sex next door, kids running up and down the halls, etc.

Then, there's the scenery: There are camping locations that would put any luxury hotel to shame - Arizona deserts, Mexican beaches, the Oregon/Washington/BC coastline, the Appalachian trail, etc., etc., etc. Many of these locations either have free camping, or charge just a few dollars per night.

If you've got the time to do a vacation right - meaning several years - an RV is the absolute best way to do it.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:17:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 5:18:07 PM EDT by WMW]
I was thinking something like this:










www.roadtrek.com/Model.aspx?ModelID=17&YearID=7
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:39:26 PM EDT
I would love to tour the country in one of these.

With the long arm of my choice that is legal in continental US.


Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:13:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WMW:
I was thinking something like this:



Class B motorhomes like the RoadTrek have a lot of advantages - They are small and manuverable enough to double as a second daily driver, they'll tow a boat, horse trailer, a couple of ATVs or a small travel trailer; most neighbors won't object to you parking one in your driveway, and they aren't any more expensive to repair than a full-sized van. Also, unlike full-sized Class A motorhomes, you don't need to find a dealership that specializes in motorhomes to get them serviced.

However, as RVs go, they aren't cheap. Also, the small interior size and small fluid capacities limit their ability to camp for extended periods.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:41:58 PM EDT
I have a 31 foot Travel trailer. we take it out evey 6 weeks. It was less than 20 grand. The payments are $190 per month and insurance about $35. It is not the most expensive but it is sweet, with central air/heat, full bath, slide out, direct tv and surround sound.

Camp gounds run from $18-40 per night depending on location and what is furnished. Good luck and welcome to the RV world. Remember you can not grill a steak at the Holliday Inn, well not without the fire dept visiting.


Bob
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:46:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
Might I suggest an EM-50?

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_664a.jpg

...and more screen captures from it's sales video...

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_633.jpg

hobnobbing with the locals in E. Europe....(I hear it's kinda like Wisconsin...)

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_526.jpg

Spacious interior with tasteful tactical de'cor...

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_548.jpg


(my mother went to High School with and knew Harold Ramis, fwiw...)



I like it, what's the MSRP?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:33:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 5:35:54 AM EDT by SouthHoof]
We have two and still have a truck for daily use.

The bigger is a 26' travel trailer we've owned for several years. When we plan on several people coming along it's on duty. It'll sleep 8 & offers full amenities.

When it's just me & my dear wife we have an S&S truck camper. I prefer it for our travels out out west.




Notice the compartments below the door. That is a slide out that will hold 5 or 6 rifles. I've added a bit more security than the thin aluminum trap door.


eta: when traveling and you only need to stop for the night, you can stay in a Walmart parking lot for free.

'Tis the season for camper shows. Take time to visit one & look over several to see what you like. Then once you've decided what suits your needs buy a USED unit and save several thousand dollars over the cost of new. Depreciation on RV's is far worse than high end automobiles.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:45:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Skibane:
That's a pretty accurate assessment, if you're only planning on using it for short, occasional vacations.

However, some folks who travel a lot get tired of not waking up in their own bed, not being surrounded by their own things, not eating home-cooked food, not being to watch their favorite DVDs on a large-screen TV or listen to their favorite music on a good stereo system, etc.

Also, the average campground or RV resort is a lot better place to get a good night's sleep than the average hotel room - No banging doors, flushing toilets, noisy sex next door, kids running up and down the halls, etc.

Then, there's the scenery: There are camping locations that would put any luxury hotel to shame - Arizona deserts, Mexican beaches, the Oregon/Washington/BC coastline, the Appalachian trail, etc., etc., etc. Many of these locations either have free camping, or charge just a few dollars per night.

If you've got the time to do a vacation right - meaning several years - an RV is the absolute best way to do it.




Yeah. I figure if I was going to retire and spend my time traveling the country (sounds like a hoot to me), then it would make sense, especially in today's world of e-mail and such, where a permanent address isn't that critical.

Nice to be able to bring your home with you in cases like that.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 10:13:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SouthHoof:
We have two and still have a truck for daily use.

The bigger is a 26' travel trailer we've owned for several years. When we plan on several people coming along it's on duty. It'll sleep 8 & offers full amenities.

When it's just me & my dear wife we have an S&S truck camper. I prefer it for our travels out out west.

www.s-scamper.com/images/ponderosa/ponderosa.jpg


Notice the compartments below the door. That is a slide out that will hold 5 or 6 rifles. I've added a bit more security than the thin aluminum trap door.


eta: when traveling and you only need to stop for the night, you can stay in a Walmart parking lot for free.

'Tis the season for camper shows. Take time to visit one & look over several to see what you like. Then once you've decided what suits your needs buy a USED unit and save several thousand dollars over the cost of new. Depreciation on RV's is far worse than high end automobiles.



How much do the truck campers go for?
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 10:27:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zippy_The_Wonderdog:
Might I suggest an EM-50?

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_664a.jpg

...and more screen captures from it's sales video...

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_633.jpg

hobnobbing with the locals in E. Europe....(I hear it's kinda like Wisconsin...)

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_526.jpg

Spacious interior with tasteful tactical de'cor...

www.cloudster.com/Sets&Vehicles/Stripes/Stripes_548.jpg


(my mother went to High School with and knew Harold Ramis, fwiw...)



TV had PJ Soles on last night (MTV or VH1).
Man, she aged badly.
That's gonna fuck up my jerkin'.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 12:56:59 PM EDT
I'd love to own one, and I am sure I will at least have a trailer one day. I don't see the RV as the equivalent of a motel room though (although these days I'd expect to pay more like $100 a night for a motel near a lot of cities, and $200 some places, and eating out three meals a day is unhealthgy and expensive).

It would be great to have all my camping and travelling stuff stored out in the RV so I can take off without spending a day packing everything in the car for a trip especially a camping trip.

I know someone who owns a big diesel pusher RV that must have cost $500k. He and his wife have been on the road 3-4 years now non-stop (they sold their house). They find someplace they like and stay a couple of months at a time, and spend a whole year touring one area like the Pacific NW or British Columbia.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:10:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
I've often wondered about having one of these (or perhaps a smaller variant), but I can't shake the idea that if I'm going on vacation, the last thing I want to be doing is cooking and cleaning.

I can stay at many a fine hotel (clean, comfortable; not Four Seasons) and eat out for what one of those costs in itself as well as gas and maintenance and my own time.

Am I that far off?



Your pretty damn right on, if you aren't out at least a weekend a month and several weeks a year you are going to be way ahead staying in really nice hotels and eating at top grade restaurants.

Now if you get a used one where the first owner(s) took some big hits on the price depreciation you might start getting close to a better cost ratio.

The small trailers and tent trailers make the most sense because you can get them in to the back country and the big motohomes can be a real hassle because if you stop at places to visit you have to find a place to leave the beast.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:16:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:20:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 6:23:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 6:24:41 PM EDT by wildearp]
Mine:



I would never have one, but there are no hotels where I ride in the desert. 3 water tanks, fuel tank, generator, shower, toilet, lots of food, two bikes fit in the back, and as you can see, it is a chick magnet!!!


It cost $29K to build, it is a custom. I got it for $16K. That is how much it depreciated in two years.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:56:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 7:59:04 PM EDT by Skibane]

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
I don't see the RV as the equivalent of a motel room though



Yep, you're right - No motel room I've ever stayed in had a SelectComfort mattress, 200+ channels of DirecTV, a dozen firearms in the closet, 2 cases of cold beer in the fridge, a barbecue grill, your own personal clotheswasher and drier, half a side of beef in the freezer, a fresh plate of nachos warming up in the convection microwave oven, and...well, you get the idea...
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:00:12 PM EDT
second residance on your taxes
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:19:49 PM EDT

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:41:34 PM EDT
I built this one from scratch. It sleeps two people comfortably, has a kitchen in the back, and fits in the garage in the winter.

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:56:19 PM EDT
Nice work...


But if you want an RV, its gonna look like an RV. If you want to be steathly, get a camper shell on a truck and throw in some sleeping backs and a cooler. Don't forget the TP so you can shit in the bushes.

Link Posted: 2/11/2006 4:01:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ar15bubba:
www.70slivekidvid.com/ark/ark2intro.gif
www.70slivekidvid.com/ark/ark_2.jpg





Good grief! Where'd you dig up THAT memory?

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