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Posted: 1/8/2005 6:08:18 PM EDT
Anybody else read it?

I really got a feel for the armor war, especially the T-34, Tiger I, and the Mark IV.

The book portrayed the T-34 as essentially a track based version of the human wave. Inferior, but if you get enough of them, they overwhelm the superior training and armament.

It was also neat to find out about the Night Witches, Soviet women pilots who would bomb Axis posistions in obsolete aircraft.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 6:11:56 PM EDT
Fiction? I was excited there for a sec
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 6:35:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SS109:
Anybody else read it?

I really got a feel for the armor war, especially the T-34, Tiger I, and the Mark IV.

The book portrayed the T-34 as essentially a track based version of the human wave. Inferior, but if you get enough of them, they overwhelm the superior training and armament.

It was also neat to find out about the Night Witches, Soviet women pilots who would bomb Axis posistions in obsolete aircraft.



I was never really a fan of the Tiger I ,  powerful  88mm gun but slow moving turret making it vulnerable when caught from its flanks or from behind off guard or outnumbered.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 6:48:46 PM EDT
If you like Russian Front fiction, read Scars of Honor.

And yes, the battle of Kursk was awesome.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 6:51:12 PM EDT


I was never really a fan of the Tiger I ,  powerful  88mm gun but slow moving turret making it vulnerable when caught from its flanks or from behind off guard or outnumbered.



The Tiger was a powerful weapon when used what it was designed for: head-on assault.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:08:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 7:09:16 PM EDT by eodtech2000]

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:

Originally Posted By SS109:
Anybody else read it?

I really got a feel for the armor war, especially the T-34, Tiger I, and the Mark IV.

The book portrayed the T-34 as essentially a track based version of the human wave. Inferior, but if you get enough of them, they overwhelm the superior training and armament.

It was also neat to find out about the Night Witches, Soviet women pilots who would bomb Axis posistions in obsolete aircraft.



I was never really a fan of the Tiger I ,  powerful  88mm gun but slow moving turret making it vulnerable when caught from its flanks or from behind off guard or outnumbered.



But on the open steppes of Russia, it didn't have to have a fast moving turret.  It farking decimated everything in range.  There are plenty of incident's of just 1 or 2 Tigers controlling a battlefield, T-34's faired about as well as Shermans.  

I won't mention the Tiger II as front on, it was impenetrable from anything on the battlefield. There are no known reports of its frontal armor ever getting penetrated. Its gun was even more deadly, the 88mm KwK 43 L71 tank gun was a flat shooting beast.  
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:10:10 PM EDT
I've never been a fan of WWII fiction.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:13:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Va_Dinger:
I've never been a fan of WWII fiction.



+1

Too many true stories from that war to get too wrapped up in the fiction.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:17:03 PM EDT
The book portrayed the T-34 as essentially a track based version of the human wave. Inferior, but if you get enough of them, they overwhelm the superior training and armament.




At the time it was introduced, nothing came close to the T-34.  The main weakness was it had a two man turret, and lack of communication equipment.  It's final version, the T-34/85, was superior to the US Sherman, and German Mk IV in every way.  Only the Tiger (in firepower only) and the Panther could compete.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 7:24:11 PM EDT
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