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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/30/2005 7:33:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2005 4:08:45 PM EDT by ZW17]
Give me your pros and cons for both.

What is the life span on a DLP??
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:35:55 PM EDT
LCD - less likely to experience screen "burn-in". That said, the newer rear projection sets have an awesome picture and are a lot less expensive.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:36:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 7:37:49 PM EDT by GC456]
DLP! No burn in, no pixles to burn out, and nothing to maintain/clean.

I just got a Mitsubishi 62" Diamond DLP and it fucking RULES!
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:37:22 PM EDT
Is it coming from New Orleans????
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:37:37 PM EDT
Depends on whether you are swimming it home? If you are, take the lighter of the two.

I would actually vote "other" and go with a digital projector.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:39:17 PM EDT
Ok, riddle me this....

What happens when your carrying your new TV and a rescue boat comes by and the wake is enough to saturate the electronics?

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:50:36 PM EDT
Personnally I went with a DLP and could not be happier other than maybe going one more size up. looked at them all and without paying 2-3 tiimes as much for a high end plasma, the DLP has the best picture. Digital TV is the bomb.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:51:16 PM EDT
Plasma.

I wouldnt give up my JVC plasma for 10 LCD or DLP televisions.

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:55:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 7:57:28 PM EDT
Plasma has the best picture. I have a Pioneer 42" plasma and it has a better picture than my friend's brand new Sony HDTV LCD of similar screen size. At the TV store, the plasmas have the best picture when shown next to other types.

They are VERY expensive and can burn out pixels however, so a DLP or LCD might be a good choice for someone who has a limited budget and needs better durability and you still can get a decent picture.

Link Posted: 8/30/2005 8:36:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Gooch:
They are VERY expensive and can burn out pixels however, so a DLP or LCD might be a good choice for someone who has a limited budget and needs better durability and you still can get a decent picture.



LCD can lose pixels, too.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 8:44:55 PM EDT
LCD. you don't wanna get sued when a looter hurts his back carrying it off.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 11:56:53 PM EDT
Flat panel LCDs are limited to size, and I've never really liked plasmas.

Of all the digital techs, DLP is the best, but properly calibrated CRT projection is still the benchmark for quality, nothing else comes close.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 12:04:41 AM EDT


Link Posted: 8/31/2005 12:15:23 AM EDT
DLP accept no other.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 12:18:06 AM EDT
DLP, plasma is still too expensive
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 12:25:18 AM EDT
I emailed you some horribly long and boring analysis my group and I had to write in Business School regarding different television formats and Pioneer's future role. The graphs didn't come out right in the copy and paste and there is a lot of info you don't need but hopefully there'll be some relevant information for you. BTW-it is over a year old so things may have changed.

A quick synopsis for you

>50 go DLP
42-50 Plasma
<42 LCD

DLPs are improving very quickly and have the strongest industry growth. They are also the cheapest by far, relative to size. They don't experience burn in or "ghosts" but are about 14 inches deep - almost ten inches deeper than the others. DLP style projection may also be referred to as LCD projection.

Plasmas are considered the oldest technology of the three even though LCD monitors have been around for a long time. They are coming down in price and have greatly increased their quality and lifetime hours. They also produce the most heat and use the most electricity (still a nonissue though) and do still have some issues with burn in on the glass.

LCD manufacturers are also moving along the learning curve quickly. Cost is coming down but not at the rate of plasmas. They are most cost effective at smaller sizes and the glass is by far the most expensive part of LCDs, which is currently limiting its feasibility at larger sizes. The problem of "ghosting" or seeing traces on the screen has pretty much been made a thing of the past with newer sets. There is still a problem of dead pixels, which you probably won't be able to see unless very very very close, but you'll always know on the inside that they are there.

Hopefully this or the very long winded email help.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:30:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:47:54 AM EDT
Fascinating thread. I'm always checking out the televisions at Sears when we make the trip there.

Currently, we have a 2003 JVC 36" model. It's not plasma, LCD, or anything exotic, just a regular high-end traditional model. The picture is pretty darn good, better than many of the televisions on the showroom floor now at Sears. All the home electronics (VCR, DVD player, 5.1 home theater) connected to the television are JVC as well.

At some point I would like to get a 50-52" television as long as it didn't take up much space and the picture was as good or better than the model we have now.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:50:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
When dealing with projection sets, D-ILA is superior to DLP in fill factor, which means that D-ILA
gives a smoother, more filmlike image.

At this point, only the absolute highest end D-ILA units offer the sort of picture quality that a
very discriminating CRT projector user like myself would even consider wanting to watch at home.


JVC has a 52" D-ILA flatscreen at Sears. I'm not impressed with the picture quality.

Retails for $2,499.00 but I could have gotten one for $1,814.00 out the door...and passed on it.

And I'm a JVC junkie.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:10:14 AM EDT
Plasma - lasts 1 year tops.
LCD - make sure the backlight is cheap to replace.

Projection Displays:
Check the lamp life, that is the biggest cost factor.
LCD is good, same with LCoS and DLP.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:15:03 PM EDT
For now I'm sticking with the CRT... I simply gentle myself to the idea that I'll have to replace a flat panel every 5 years.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:16:04 PM EDT
DLP. Best around for the money.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:26:14 PM EDT
Other, either a Beamer, one by Acer or a trinitron flat TV by Sony.
Plasma and LCD Tvs are awesome and everything but not worth the price. 16000.- Sfr? No thanks.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:35:30 PM EDT
DLP

Best bang for the buck.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:40:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
When dealing with projection sets, D-ILA is superior to DLP in fill factor, which means that D-ILA
gives a smoother, more filmlike image.

At this point, only the absolute highest end D-ILA units offer the sort of picture quality that a
very discriminating CRT projector user like myself would even consider wanting to watch at home.

It's the virtual absence of any visible pixel structure (a total lack of "screen door effect" that does it for me.

But no digital can yet equal what my CRT projectors deliver, overall. I will be sticking with what
I have for many years to come. With brand new tubes in my best projectors, it'll be ten years or more
before the tubes are worn out, given my viewing habits. (I watch only movies on my projectors,
and only a couple of hours' worth per month.)

My solution isn't for everyone. It's only for those who want the best POSSIBLE picture, with little
regard for other considerations.


CJ



Yes, DiLA is nice, but I'm a black level junkie, and DLP is the only digital tech that comes even remotely close to satisfying me.

Pretty much all the digital techs have some kind of image quality drawback. CRTs don't, CRT's drawbacks are all convenience related, and i can deal with that.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:47:28 PM EDT
I've always wanted a TV that is guaranteed to last me less than 5 years and will burn the image in if I leave it paused to long. Paying twice what other methods cost for an equal picture and a horrible life span is just an added plus.

I'll take the projection mehtod if I ever to drop that much on a TV.
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