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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/7/2005 7:05:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:16:20 PM EDT
"Sir" works wonders.

Before you call me a smart ass, just know that I speak both the Mandarin and Taiwanese dialects of the Chinese language, and there is nothing that translates into English readily. That said, there is more than one way to show respect. Certain actions, such as listening without talking back and being unerringly polite is a show of respect for elders.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:24:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:30:26 PM EDT
best that could probaly be done is the use the surname followed by "shang"
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:36:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 7:42:05 PM EDT by SevenMMmag]

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
Is there a formal or respectful way to refer to someone in Chinese, like the Mandarin version of the Japanese -san?



Are you going to meet a Chinese guy and greet him? Do you have more details about the situation?

I'm Chinese and I actually am not aware of any "formal" greeting or title that you are supposed to give to the person. usually, we just say "Hello sir" and shake hands.

ETA: there is actually a formal way for children to greet elders, but I'm assuming that won't apply for you

Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:46:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:49:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 7:53:16 PM EDT by Bostonterrier97]
"Da Sa Kwa"

works wonders

Another really good phrase is: "Da Bee In" and "Nee Han Pow Lee On" when they reply just follow by: "Cha Ga Wah I Nee, Sang Jing Bing"
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:51:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
I'm going to be meeting a lot of Chinese people in the next week or so, and just don't want to come off like the blundering kwailo that I am. I'd rather have some way to smooth the international/intercultural divide if I can.

"Hello Miss Dong/Mr. Tang, It's nice to meet you." I know xiexie (shay shay) is thank you, but that's pretty much all the Chinese I have.



Thats completely fine. If you do end up saying a snippet of chinese like "xie xie" or "ni hao(hello), it will generally be very cool unless you fuck up the pronunciation terribly.

Also, if they serve you food, make sure to eat a lot and enjoy it- we look down on picky and finicky eaters
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:52:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 7:56:00 PM EDT by Wash-Ar15]
jarhead shang,ni hao ma? remember slurping your soup is ok and eat all the pigs feet and ear that they bring.YUM
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:57:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 8:00:20 PM EDT by FredM]
Nin Hao is the formal " You good"

As opposed to Ni Hao



Also you can say

xian1 sheng 先生

for Sir

and

女士

nv3 Shi4



Hope that helps.


Link Posted: 10/7/2005 7:58:07 PM EDT
I just did this same thing. Meeting alot of Chinese that is. Do you smoke? A pack of cigarettes and a lighter is a great thing to have. Afer the initial greetings and when you have down time offer them a cirgarette. The chinese smoke alot. Also if they offer you one take it and tell them you will smoke it late. Even if you dont JUST TAKE IT AND THANK THEM!!!!! Silly small things like this were great. I got this tip from 2 of my employees who got back from Shalin after going to school there for 2 years.

james
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:01:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jimlostt:
I just did this same thing. Meeting alot of Chinese that is. Do you smoke? A pack of cigarettes and a lighter is a great thing to have. Afer the initial greetings and when you have down time offer them a cirgarette. The chinese smoke alot. Also if they offer you one take it and tell them you will smoke it late. Even if you dont JUST TAKE IT AND THANK THEM!!!!! Silly small things like this were great. I got this tip from 2 of my employees who got back from Shalin after going to school there for 2 years.

james



I have met tons of chinese and never have taken a cig. You will find that they know more than you think about american culture.

Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:04:20 PM EDT
Go to wedding in china and you will find a cig as part of your setting
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:11:36 PM EDT
Uhhhhhhhhh, I've eaten Mandarin oranges, that count?
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:26:36 PM EDT
I speak Mandarin.

As mentioned before you can say nin2 hao3. And you can follow up their last name with xian1 sheng, or xiao3 jie. But some people do not like xiao jie as it can have a prostitution implication.

Chinese is though, as you have to deal with the tones, how you say something makes all the difference. However, the Chinese are very complimentative and should be really happy to hear any effort you have to make.

You could also say:
Wo3 hen2 gao1 xing4 ren4shi ni3. (Very nice to meet you).

Happy to answer any other questions you have, too.

Brian/Gao
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:48:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:51:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/7/2005 8:53:37 PM EDT by SevenMMmag]

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
Do you guys who are posting suggestions realize that there are numbers mixed in with the letters in what you're posting?



yes, there are 4 different "tones" to pronounce chinese words.

The numbers 1-4 refer to the tone marks, and indicates how the word is to be emphasized.

For example, saying a certain word with a sharp "downward" emphasis (#4) could mean one thing, but saying the same word while emphasizing "upward" (#2) can mean something completely different.


# 1st tone = high pitch, remaining even throughout the syllable
# 2nd tone = rising pitch, starting low and rising throughout the syllable
# 3rd tone = falling pitch, starting at about mid-range, dropping, then rising sharply if spoken in isolation or at the end of a phrase, but often staying low before another syllable
# 4th tone = sharply falling pitch, from high to low.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:55:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:
Do you guys who are posting suggestions realize that there are numbers mixed in with the letters in what you're posting?


Originally Posted By The_Alchemist:
I speak Mandarin.

As mentioned before you can say nin2 hao3. And you can follow up their last name with xian1 sheng, or xiao3 jie. But some people do not like xiao jie as it can have a prostitution implication.

Chinese is though, as you have to deal with the tones, how you say something makes all the difference. However, the Chinese are very complimentative and should be really happy to hear any effort you have to make.

You could also say:
Wo3 hen2 gao1 xing4 ren4shi ni3. (Very nice to meet you).

Happy to answer any other questions you have, too.

Brian/Gao


Thanks, but if I'm in danger of making a prostitution implication because of a mispronunciation, I'll stick with English!



The numbers represent what 'tone' to say the word as. 1 is first tone, 2 second tone, etc.

1st tone is a high tone, so you have to raise the pitch of your voice when you say it.
2nd tone is a rising tone, you start at a lower pitch when saying a word and rise up to a higher pitch by the end.
3rd is a dipping tone, so you lower your tone and go back up, (but you don't always go back up depending)
4th is a falling tone, start high, end low, so it sounds kind of forceful when you say it.

But don't worry about it. Tones are a bitch. It took me about two years before I was proficient with them, and you have to listen to a native speaker to really hear how they should sound.

Anyway, the xiao jie for ms. and xiao jie for prostitute are pronounced exactly the same. It's just that one of the words for prostitute in Chinese is "san pei xiao jie," which literally means "Three services miss."

Chinese though is a lot of fun, and its way interesting the more you learn. By far the favorite of all the languages I've studdied.

Brian
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 8:56:14 PM EDT
Try a formal greeting like......."wAlmArT cHa ChINg" or maybe "Hi Ya Comrade" or better yet, "Hello angry red menace"
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 9:00:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SPECTRE:
Try a formal greeting like......."wAlmArT cHa ChINg" or maybe "Hi Ya Comrade" or better yet, "Hello angry red menace"



You know its funny, in Chinese, "comrade" is said "tong zhi." It was very common to call one another that from 1949 until recently. However, today it is what you call gay people.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 9:02:21 PM EDT
You guys madarin is too good for me. Never went to Chinese school,just learned it on my own
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