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Posted: 9/17/2004 6:54:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2004 6:55:49 AM EST by ktm500]
Kerry's boat is called the Scaramouche.

Guess what that stands for.

ktm500

Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:55:52 AM EST
Is it a gay term?


Sgtar15
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:58:19 AM EST
is that pronouced scary mooch?
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:58:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By sgtar15:
Is it a gay term?


Sgtar15



Nope.

Check the baot out at http://www.wrko.com/listingsEntry.asp?ID=177492&PT=

ktm500
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:58:35 AM EST
That's hilarious...

Scar·a·mouch also Scar·a·mouche     P   Pronunciation Key  (skr-msh, -mch, -mouch)
n.
A stock character in commedia dell'arte and pantomime, depicted as a boastful coward or buffoon.
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:59:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2004 7:00:51 AM EST by ktm500]

Originally Posted By 700308:
is that pronouced scary mooch?



Yup.
Like in Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen.

ktm500

Oops, I thought you said Scara Mooch.
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:59:22 AM EST
I heard on the radio yesterday it means "boastful coward."
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:00:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By chrismartin:
That's hilarious...

Scar·a·mouch also Scar·a·mouche     P   Pronunciation Key  (skr-msh, -mch, -mouch)
n.
A stock character in commedia dell'arte and pantomime, depicted as a boastful coward or buffoon.



You got it.

He tells you right there what he is

ktm500
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:01:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/17/2004 7:02:14 AM EST by captainpooby]
Traitor.


Scaramouche tells the story of a somewhat indolent and carefree young man, Andre-Louis Moreau, who is jolted into the reality of his times (the French Revolution) when his poet friend Philippe de Vilmorin is deliberately forced into a duel against the sword master, the Marquis de La Tour d'Azyr - the outcome was naturally foregone and to the Marquis, another troublesome republican is laid to rest.

Moreau embarks on a series of adventures, supposedly to continue his dead friend's beliefs even though he does not share them himself. Soon marked as a traitor, he joins a travelling group of actors. Before long, circumstances conspire that he should play "Scaramouche" on stage and in front of the Marquis. Unable to contain his hatred, he lampoons the nobility unmercifully and draws fresh chase apon himself. It would not be a Sabatini if there were not romance in there too. Moreau falls desperately in love with Aline de Kercadiou, though the course of their love is by no means smooth

Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:01:48 AM EST
There was a movie by that name, I think. I believe it was a Three Musketeers type of dealie.
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:11:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:30:44 AM EST
Are you sure it's not the tereza-douche?
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 7:39:16 AM EST
Scaramouche?!

Scaramouche?!



Will he do the fandango?

Thunderbolts and lightning,
very very frightening


Galileo
Galileo
­Galileo Figaroooooo
magnificoooo....
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 11:45:26 AM EST
I was wondering how long it was going to take for someone to do the Queen thing...
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 3:28:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By kindstranger:
There was a movie by that name, I think. I believe it was a Three Musketeers type of dealie.

Stewart Granger Starred in it.

Decent flick. Decent sword fights.
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 3:31:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Are you sure it's not the tereza-douche?




BWAHAHAHA!!!
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 6:25:23 PM EST
There's a stock character in the Italian comedia del arte called capitano, the boastful braggart military officer who bores everyone with his endless stories about his personal bravery in combat.

Sound like anyone we know?
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