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Posted: 1/5/2012 6:48:33 PM EDT


My grandmother always had these and they got used when the power went out, usually due to winter storms. I found some for sale at a local hardware store and so I bought one with a jar of fuel. It's winter, might as well have some light if the power goes out. The preparedness types ought to consider buying a few.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:50:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:50:33 PM EDT
Prefer the lower fire hazard of LED lanterns.

They run for a long time on D cells.

Of course someone is going to chime in with some monstrously overblown claims that EMP is going to make my watch spin backwards and that my lanterns will be useless.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:50:44 PM EDT
I have several for 'just in case'
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:53:28 PM EDT
I have some. I do agree with the others that LEDs are a better way to go. I've also read that some of the lamps don't quite run right on today's fuel. Food for thought.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:55:21 PM EDT
I've been meaning to get a few just in case. The little bit of heat from it would be nice in the winter too if the power went out.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:57:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JVD:
I've been meaning to get a few just in case. The little bit of heat from it would be nice in the winter too if the power went out.


You would be better off with a catalytic heater

They run on kerosene I think. No flame either. Nice and safe.

Then buy some decent LED lanterns.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:58:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JVD:
The little bit of heat from it would be nice in the winter too if the power went out.


And would be an absolute bitch in the summertime.

If you need a heater, buy a heater.

As previously mentioned, LED lights are the only way to go - Produce much more light in a much smaller package, can be turned on or off instantly, and have no fire or CO hazards.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:59:16 PM EDT
The "lamp oil" I always see for sale is actually paraffin, not kerosene. It smells less and creates less soot when it burns, but it produces far less light and won't work on a lot of the old kerosene lamps at all. I've got a few Dietz lanterns that it works fine for, but I generally confine them to outside use only and run 'em off "tiki torch fuel" which is just paraffin dyed yellow with citronella scent added. That shit goes on crazy sale at the end of the summer.

Using a wick lantern for paraffin ruins the wick for kerosene, but a lantern used with kerosene will have no problem switching to paraffin.

Kerosene is generally found at funkier gas stations around here, but can also be had at the big box hardware stores in cans. The cans are higher grade and stink less but they were 3x or more the price of getting it at the pump last I checked. You can sometimes find those cans on deep discount at the end of the heating season if you keep an eye out, people generally use the stuff for space heaters.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 6:59:18 PM EDT
I have a couple but my wife doesn't like the smell. We just use candles and led lanterns for normal lighting and a propane lantern if we really need to light things ups.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:02:47 PM EDT
K-1 is a nasty, stinky, dangerous fuel.

I am in the LED crowd.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:04:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By JVD:
The little bit of heat from it would be nice in the winter too if the power went out.


And would be an absolute bitch in the summertime.

If you need a heater, buy a heater.

As previously mentioned, LED lights are the only way to go - Produce much more light in a much smaller package, can be turned on or off instantly, and have no fire or CO hazards.


And the latest LED lights can run for DAYS off of a single AA battery, with the options of very high output and in-between with the click of a switch.

A few packs of batteries from your club store and you have the equivalent of many drums of dangerous fuel in your back yard.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:13:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gator:
Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By JVD:
The little bit of heat from it would be nice in the winter too if the power went out.


And would be an absolute bitch in the summertime.

If you need a heater, buy a heater.

As previously mentioned, LED lights are the only way to go - Produce much more light in a much smaller package, can be turned on or off instantly, and have no fire or CO hazards.


And the latest LED lights can run for DAYS off of a single AA battery, with the options of very high output and in-between with the click of a switch.

A few packs of batteries from your club store and you have the equivalent of many drums of dangerous fuel in your back yard.


When we had our 8 day home camping experience a few months back, I didn't even get through the rechargeables and into the alkalines. Never even considered the lithiums.

If you're lighting or heating with flame, especially in a power outage or emergency situation, you really do need good CO detectors with good batteries. We do wood stoves, and I have CO detectors on each floor. Plug ins with battery backup. On day 4 of the outage I was out looking for 9v batteries to feed the CO detectors which each started beeping (and scared the hell out of me), because the batteries were nearly dead when the power went. They were near end of life anyway, so I replaced 'em with AA powered models. I keep those in stock, not fucking 9v bullshit.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:18:04 PM EDT
I have a wind up LED lantern that also takes batteries from L.L. Bean. Batteries run out or you lose an arm and can't wind? There is a solar panel. Sun goes out? You have bigger problems.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:26:11 PM EDT
Coleman lanterns, not just for camping anymore.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:30:43 PM EDT
LED lanterns and D cell batteries. My days of screwing with Kerosene are over. Last time I messed with it, was after Hurricane Ivan.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:35:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Burley:
Coleman lanterns, not just for camping anymore.


Them'll kill ya inside. Kerosene produces CO, but not anything like a Coleman lantern.

I've set one outside near a window and tried lighting a room that way. It kind of worked.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:37:43 PM EDT
Another vote for LED.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:43:58 PM EDT
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:53:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


There's the obvious fire risk. There's nothing really wrong with it, just there are better options out there.

You could run your car on wood tires too. Check out Mythbusters.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:00:00 PM EDT
Get a lard lamp or two...that way you can render down zombies (or neighbors) and have light
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:02:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:07:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.


I know a few fire inspectors in the Ozarks, and I hear stories. Don't give some of the folks there so much credit.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:08:21 PM EDT
Sure we have mostly LED lanterns which are far more practical, but we also have a few kerosene lamps around just for the cool factor.

To cut down on any annoying odors, we use Kleen-Heat kerosene substitute.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:10:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.


Damn, what a tragedy.

Although I'd argue she's not brilliant, what idiot doesn't know you don't put hot stuff in a garbage can in the house? Then again, I'm not sure I want to know the answer to that.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:10:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.


I know a few fire inspectors in the Ozarks, and I hear stories. Don't give some of the folks there so much credit.


Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:12:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 8:12:15 PM EDT by DanTSX]
Originally Posted By Gator:
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.


Damn, what a tragedy.

Although I'd argue she's not brilliant, what idiot doesn't know you don't put hot stuff in a garbage can in the house? Then again, I'm not sure I want to know the answer to that.


Brilliant, but not practical.

Yeah, it's a terrible shame. My old CEO lives a few houses down. Everyone knew each other well.

Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:18:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Burley:
Coleman lanterns, not just for camping anymore.



It's a cleaner burn but the mantles are too fragile.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:18:55 PM EDT
Little bit of advice for those lamps: look at an antique oil lamp. They will most likely have a very wide, but shallow, fuel reservoir.

The modern lamps, like you have pictured, do not.

The reason the older lamps had wide, shallow reservoirs was because the capillary action of the wick can only efficiently lift fuel so far. Some folks will toss decorative glass beads in the fuel reservoirs of modern lamps in order to get the same general effect. It will cut down on the overall fuel capacity, but you won't starve your wick for fuel as much.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:21:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 8:47:20 PM EDT by Tim_the_enchanter]
I used mine earlier this evening when we had a brief power outtage. Electricity went out from about 4:30 PM to about 7:00 PM. I broke out the oil lamps, A couple of LED flashlights, some chemlights for the kids to play with, and the emergency radio.
I took a drive around the area and it was clear that the power would not be out for long, so I didn't bother with the genny.
When the power goes out, the first things that come out are the flash lights, the fire extinguisher, the oil lamps, and the radio. Hurricane lamps are a fire hazzard and don't give off much light. Enough to keep you from tripping over things in the house, that's about it. However, you don't have to charge them, and you don't have to worry about batteries going dead during storage. I use a combination of light sources for emergencies, including oil lamps, candles, flashlights, LED lanterns, and chemlights (the kids love chemlights).

Edit;

FWIW, I use lamp oil in my hurricane lamps, rather than kerosene.

Re edit;

Never had a problem with lamp oil.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:31:43 PM EDT
Have several of the older oil lamps, and a handfull of older Dietz Barn lamps that get used when power goes out, and no need to fire up the Gennie.

Fire hazzard is there with the glass lamps, so keep them in the middle of a table so kids, dogs, cats, etc, wont knock them off.
RR and Barn Lamps are the ticket though, as they can take a good hard drop and not spill or break.
Most lamps made since the middle 1900's are self extinguishing if tipped, but I dunno about all the fish head eating shit getting imported now.

When you buy oil, get the most clear Lamp oil you can find, and there is no smell IF the wick is adjusted right and kept trimmed.
If you run Red K1 from the pump you will have the strong smell and problems with the wicks getting clogged, so stick with the clear K1 if you go that route and don't mind the smell.

DONT use PARRAFIN oil in a wick lamp EVER! The shit will clog the wick, burns crazy and uneven with surging and flare ups.
The fuckstains label it "Lamp oil" but it was meant for those stupid floating candle things that women buy, use once, and then put into deep storage with Grandmas fondu pot.

Lehmans has a pretty good supply of lamp stuff if your local hardware dosn't normally cater to us luddites.

http://www.lehmans.com/?partner_id=bcbgoog&9gtype=search&9gkw=lehmans&9gad=8738509724.1&9gag=1868051564&gclid=CKSMtsfKuq0CFQcKKgodyyioBA











Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:36:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2012 8:39:01 PM EDT by WinstonSmith]
There's actually a few different types of kerosene lantern or lamp. I geeked out on it for a while.

Ya got your wick lamps, basically just a wick and a chimney of some sort like the one in the OP. They're sooty both to the glass and to the ceiling above, maybe the wall too if it's close. They're not real bright for what they burn.

The next step was the hot blast lantern, like so:


Notice the "T" at the top, it captures the exhaust and pipes it back around into the flame, reburning much of the crud and adding a little brightness. These are some of the most efficient, but they're not as bright as...

The next development, the cold blast lantern. Like so:


These added some cool fresh air to the exhaust being piped around into the flame through the tubes. This increased fuel consumption a bit, but increased brightness as well.

Dietz lanterns are still being made, though in China. The Chinese ones are kind of shitty, but Dietz lanterns were never exactly finely crafted.

Then there's pressurized kerosene lanterns that run similarly to coleman fuel lanterns. Coleman makes some but Petromax is the big name, mostly outside the US. There's a zillion copies of them and many of those really suck. Kerosene pressure lanterns generally require preheating and are generally a raging pain in the ass compared to... Well... Any other source of light I can think of really.

I don't really consider Kerosene a "must have" fuel. Coleman fuel works better in small stoves and BRIGHT outdoor lanterns, and electric works better inside. YMMV

ETA- oh, the important bit.. Dietz lanterns are "supposed" to snuff themselves out if they tip over AND THEY'RE NOT OVERFILLED. How well that actually works in practice is debatable, but that was one intent of the design.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:44:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By S-28:
Have several of the older oil lamps, and a handfull of older Dietz Barn lamps that get used when power goes out, and no need to fire up the Gennie.

Fire hazzard is there with the glass lamps, so keep them in the middle of a table so kids, dogs, cats, etc, wont knock them off.
RR and Barn Lamps are the ticket though, as they can take a good hard drop and not spill or break.
Most lamps made since the middle 1900's are self extinguishing if tipped, but I dunno about all the fish head eating shit getting imported now.

When you buy oil, get the most clear Lamp oil you can find, and there is no smell IF the wick is adjusted right and kept trimmed.
If you run Red K1 from the pump you will have the strong smell and problems with the wicks getting clogged, so stick with the clear K1 if you go that route and don't mind the smell.

DONT use PARRAFIN oil in a wick lamp EVER! The shit will clog the wick, burns crazy and uneven with surging and flare ups.
The fuckstains label it "Lamp oil" but it was meant for those stupid floating candle things that women buy, use once, and then put into deep storage with Grandmas fondu pot.

Lehmans has a pretty good supply of lamp stuff if your local hardware dosn't normally cater to us luddites.

http://www.lehmans.com/?partner_id=bcbgoog&9gtype=search&9gkw=lehmans&9gad=8738509724.1&9gag=1868051564&gclid=CKSMtsfKuq0CFQcKKgodyyioBA















^^^^^^^ This right here is truth.


Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:46:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sixgun_Symphony:
http://caperfrasers.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/kerosene-lamp.jpg

My grandmother always had these and they got used when the power went out, usually due to winter storms. I found some for sale at a local hardware store and so I bought one with a jar of fuel. It's winter, might as well have some light if the power goes out. The preparedness types ought to consider buying a few.


Yup, I have one of those and five lanterns for storms.

I live in the country and power can be iffy out here.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:49:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
They work, but they don't light up like "Little House on the Prairie," and also, they stink and can easily burn your house down, just like all the burned down barns in the old westerns. The battery operated LEDs or flourescents are way mo' betta.


You gotta really fuck up to do something stupid with a small fire like these though.

I have a fire( woodstove ) in my living room right now to heat my house, so lanterns during a storm are the least of my worries.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 8:58:25 PM EDT
I am going with this for long term SHTF, a whale oil lamp:



Land whales will be dying off all over the place and there will all the fat that I could possibly need, ready to be rendered.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:03:58 PM EDT
I've got a few of 'em. I like the squat ones with square bases –– they're a whole lot less likely to tip over. I use one regularly to sit outside and provide a little light to smoke cigars or pipes with. Nice when you don't want a harsh LED glare and don't mind a bit of heat.

I have a kero heater as a second-line backup plan, so I have a fair bit of K1 stored. Haven't tried it in these but it's nice to know it will work if there's nothing else.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:06:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By theBUBBAMANcan:
Originally Posted By Burley:
Coleman lanterns, not just for camping anymore.



It's a cleaner burn but the mantles are too fragile.


A set usually lasts me at least a year or two of riding around In my truck.
Cary several spare sets just in case as they are cheap and don't take much space...

The nice thing about Coleman lanterns is that you can use them with gasoline or Coleman fuel....and they produce a lot of light.
Just crack a window for ventilation....
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:10:45 PM EDT
hand sanitizer on a dinner plate works too
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:37:35 PM EDT
I am with LED crowd. Personally I would rather not have an open flame for light during an emergency, therefore nearly zero chance of having a fire, and if you have a fire during an emergency the FD may not even respond.

Besides LEDs are so much brighter and there is zero chance for fire.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:54:41 PM EDT
Same here, used them all the time when I was a kid when the power went out in the winter.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 10:29:36 PM EDT
Yes, fantastic SHTF lamps if you are planning on whaling.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 10:40:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By theBUBBAMANcan:
Originally Posted By Burley:
Coleman lanterns, not just for camping anymore.



It's a cleaner burn but the mantles are too fragile.


Really? mine last years if I dont tote them around in the truck to go camping. Easilyhave 2 years on the current ones as I use it when I run the smoker. Maybe try finding a safe place to store the lantern that it isnt getting banged around? I keep it in its case or hung on a hook and bring it out and hang it on a beer feeder hanger pole I set in a 5 gallon bucket of cement. When camping I throw a rope over a limb for an area light.

Af for the oil lamp. we have a decorative one with a real wide wick and run parafin in it. Its about as bright as a 40 watt light bulb and I place it in the middle of the dining room table. Being as I not fucking retarded and dont go knocking shit over all the time... I dont see an issue. It works quite well no matter what time of year for short term outages. before I start the generator etc.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 11:25:10 PM EDT
Aladdin Lamps

They create a brilliant white light and a good bit of heat, very good stuff.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 11:55:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DanTSX:
Originally Posted By Floofy:
Nothing wrong with kerosene as an option. Don't knock it over and it won't light on fire, I can't see a problem with it. Any open flame can be dangerous, just treat it with some respect as you would a firearm and it will work fine.

We've got a few sitting around but haven't used them in awhile. I'm not sure I'd know where to buy kerosene if I wanted it.


my old man is a fire inspector

death and major property loss from fire and CO poisoning go up dramatically when the lights go out and flames come out.

Our homes are not set up for open flames like they might have been before the invention of the lightbulb. We may have sources of light from fire, but insufficient fixtures. Also, the glass of those lamps is not as strong as it used to be. Those are mainly decorative only.

It is not just dumb idiots only that do this. Last week a brilliant advertising executive down the road from us in CT killed her three kids and her two parents because they put hot ashes in a garbage can because the kids were afraid to "burn" santa. Your most slack jawed yokel from the ozarks knows this, but she didn't.


According to the story in the New York Post (and elsewhere) the woman's boyfriend was the one who placed the bag of embers on the back porch. The mother and father of the children are legally separated. The story quoted the boyfriend as claiming that he "was all right" and they he and his girlfriend "would get through this OK" (words to that effect). One of the photos from the wake/funeral showed the boyfriend standing behind the woman and her husband with his hands on their shoulders comforting them. It made my skin crawl. I can only wonder how long this woman can stay with the man who caused her three little girls and her parent to die?



http://www.ctpost.com/news/slideshow/Christmas-fire-funeral-34205.php#photo-1998171
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:01:59 AM EDT
we have about 12 of them at the BOL, along with various types of lanterns. the real issue is fuel storage and the resulting fire hazard––one of our planning projects is figuring out how to do a small storage bunker outside.

for minor emergencies though, i'll agree with the poster who said that battery lanterns are really the way to go.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:13:46 AM EDT
We have some of the Dietz railroad-type lanterns just for such an occasion and have used them in the past when the power goes out. Fire hazard? Maybe, but not significant if care is taken. Note we don't have little kids now either to knock them over. Also have a few LED camping lanterns. Good to have a back-up source of light. Heck...the Dietz lanterns even put out some heat too. Candles...very bad in my opinion.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:24:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PanzerOfDoom:
Aladdin Lamps

They create a brilliant white light and a good bit of heat, very good stuff.

This is what you want, with lamp oil. Almost equivalent to a 60 watt bulb.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:39:08 AM EDT
I have a couple of old ones. If I have to use them, I plan to put them on the deck and let the light shine in the house from the outside. It seems like it would be less messy and maybe safer too. Ive tried it; it works.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 4:42:52 AM EDT
I use a combination of led and propane lanterns when the power goes out. My gas-type Coleman lanterns are used outside or sparingly inside.

All this fear of fire is BS with someone that knows their way around fuel lanterns. Just don't leave them on when you go to sleep. As for mantles I keep a box-full on-hand.

I have some oil lanterns/lamps but they are just for last ditch use just because of the soot they put out. You had to clean the globes of a oil lamp every-day or so for a reason back in the day.

Heck, my old hunt-camp lighting was all gas-light fixtures.
Link Posted: 1/6/2012 5:00:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
FWIW, I use lamp oil in my hurricane lamps, rather than kerosene.

Re edit;

Never had a problem with lamp oil.


This.
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