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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/19/2012 4:26:36 PM EST
Step 1. Procure country ham, salt cured like God intended. I usually get from IGA, but Kroger had Clifty Farm for $1.99/#.



Take it to butcher counter and request hock be cut off. This will add awesome to a pot of soup beans or greens beans.



Yes, that's mold. You'd me moldy too if you hang in a bag for 10 months. It comes off with mineral oil.






Rehydrating. Change water 2 or 3 times in the next day or so.
. This will take some of the salt out of it.

Tune in for our next chapter on cooking this fine goodness.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:36:14 PM EST
Wow great price. No way do we have that here.

My buddy from Va said he would soak them in milk.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:41:45 PM EST
I sure do miss some good Ol' country ham..... Uprooted Kentucky boy.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:43:28 PM EST
Yum. Want.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:44:29 PM EST
$1.99 per pound is a steal for good ham.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:44:51 PM EST
I felt my blood pressure going up just looking at this.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:45:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By rhermes0001:
I sure do miss some good Ol' country ham..... Uprooted Kentucky boy.


Sure we can get you some. No country hams in NC? They just opened a disgusting city ham booth (Honey baked) at the local Kroger.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:53:57 PM EST
For those wanting to skip ahead to the happy ending.

Remember: After it is all cooked, including baking, put it in the refrigerator over night. It is ALWAYS served cold. SLICE IT THIN!!!!

"A country ham can be hung up in your basement indefinitely before it is
re-hydrated. Pay no attention to any signs of mold, etc.

To cook a dry-cured country ham in God's own
Commonwealth, you first take it out of the net bag, then soak it in a
big cauldron in which the ham will be covered with cold water. You soak
it for anything from 10 to 18 hours, depending on how much salt you want
to get out of it. I would recommend about 15 or 16 hours, changing the
water 2 or 3 times.

Throw the water away, fill with new water to cover the ham. In the
water put a medium sized quartered onion studded with six or eight
cloves, a dozen black pepper corns, half a dozen Allspice berries, a bay
leaf, a quartered apple, and some cider. I would put in a cup of
Bourbon whiskey, but maybe you won't. Incidentally, the alcohol will
all cook away, so all that will be left is the taste. Bring the water
to a boil, and then reduce the heat so that the ham simmers in all this
wonderful stuff. Simmer 20 minutes a pound plus another twenty minutes
to be sure. Take it out of the pot and let cool until "just warm."
Skin it with something like a really sharp "boning" knife. Work the
blade parallel to the surface of the ham to take off the skin and then
the thick layer of fat underneath. Take the fat off in thinnish
layers. You will be surprised at how much fat there is. Be careful you
don't get into the meat underneath. The fat is translucent. The meat
is, well, not translucent. Once you get all the fat off, score the ham
lightly and stud with cloves. Coat this marvelous object with a glaze.
We use one made of real maple syrup, brown sugar, dry mustard, and a cup
of Bourbon whiskey. Remember. The alcohol will be gone after cooking.
Put the ham in a preheated 350 degree oven for an hour. Let it cool
completely and you are ready to carve.

The ham has two flat sides and two curved sides. Using a very sharp ham
slicer with a long, narrow blade, slice some very thin slices off the
less curved of the two curved sides to make it flat. Then stand the ham
on that side and start carving off the more curved side. Start down
near the hock by making a vertical cut to the bone, then slice paper
thin slices, working your way toward the big end of the ham and
gradually inclining the knife so that after a while you are cutting
long, very thin slices that are six or eight inches long.

This ham will keep in the refrigerator two or three months, wrapped in
aluminum, and is an endless source of sandwiches (turkey and country ham
is one great possibility), snacks, etc. Make sure you slice it as near
to paper thin as you can manage. Otherwise, the full flavor of the ham
will overwhelm you."
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:59:10 PM EST
My Dad made the best ham hocks and beans. Mom would make cornbread. Memory from a long time ago..............
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:01:48 PM EST
Take canner, throw in ham, cloves, cup of Maker's Mark, apple.

Fill with water. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes per pound. 16 pounds so I'm going to leave it on for 5 hours.



Tonight i will turn it off, cover it with a blanket and put it to bed for about 18 hours.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:20:28 PM EST
I was sittin' there
With my fork in hand...
Staring at my lousy ravioli can...

Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:21:21 PM EST
more
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 4:27:04 PM EST
me want...

wonder how much my BP would go up though LOL

brian
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 4:28:49 PM EST
Oh damn, that looks tasty.

Do continue.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 4:29:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By thatguy:
me want...

wonder how much my BP would go up though LOL

brian


Sodium=bad for you.

Lean ham=low calorie and good for weight loss.


It is a conundrum for sure.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 4:36:46 PM EST
My Beloved cooked a ham last night for a dinner at work today. The smell wafting up stairs...........MAN!

Our co-workers ASSAULTED that ham.

I feel sorry for all you folks what ain't got no country ham.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:02:00 PM EST

tha fuck. Why are so many kyians goin full blown fuckin commie with country ham?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:03:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Take canner, throw in ham, cloves, cup of Maker's Mark, apple.

Fill with water. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes per pound. 16 pounds so I'm going to leave it on for 5 hours.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZEUlAG_wJiI/UKwWXshXs1I/AAAAAAAACDU/PROHSjuZfgI/s800/20121120_184552.jpg

Tonight i will turn it off, cover it with a blanket and put it to bed for about 18 hours.


you are boiling country ham/ do you boil bacon too?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:08:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By OilyPablo:
Wow great price. No way do we have that here.

My buddy from Va said he would soak them in milk.




never heard that.. sounds like the milk would spoil..
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:09:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By smalljaw:
Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Take canner, throw in ham, cloves, cup of Maker's Mark, apple.

Fill with water. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes per pound. 16 pounds so I'm going to leave it on for 5 hours.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZEUlAG_wJiI/UKwWXshXs1I/AAAAAAAACDU/PROHSjuZfgI/s800/20121120_184552.jpg

Tonight i will turn it off, cover it with a blanket and put it to bed for about 18 hours.


you are boiling country ham/ do you boil bacon too?


its probably more of a simmer vs a rolling boil
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:11:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Take canner, throw in ham, cloves, cup of Maker's Mark, apple.

Fill with water. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes per pound. 16 pounds so I'm going to leave it on for 5 hours.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZEUlAG_wJiI/UKwWXshXs1I/AAAAAAAACDU/PROHSjuZfgI/s800/20121120_184552.jpg

Tonight i will turn it off, cover it with a blanket and put it to bed for about 18 hours.


interesting.. how much does the Makers Mark come thru in the end?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:14:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By delemorte:
Originally Posted By smalljaw:
Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Take canner, throw in ham, cloves, cup of Maker's Mark, apple.

Fill with water. Bring to boil. Simmer 15 minutes per pound. 16 pounds so I'm going to leave it on for 5 hours.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZEUlAG_wJiI/UKwWXshXs1I/AAAAAAAACDU/PROHSjuZfgI/s800/20121120_184552.jpg

Tonight i will turn it off, cover it with a blanket and put it to bed for about 18 hours.


you are boiling country ham/ do you boil bacon too?


its probably more of a simmer vs a rolling boil



why salt cure a ham to begin with if you are gonna boil it? This world is becoming full of fuck. Slice and fry country ham and eat with biscuits, otherwise just go buy some lunch meat.

Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:15:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By delemorte:
Originally Posted By OilyPablo:
Wow great price. No way do we have that here.

My buddy from Va said he would soak them in milk.




never heard that.. sounds like the milk would spoil..


I think just the final soak and it was in the fridge. He gave me some, it was delicious.

http://www.newsomscountryham.com/howtopreprec.html

FRIED KENTUCKY COUNTRY HAM 1. Slice ham about 1/4 inch thick. 2. Trim off hard outer edge of meat and remove rind. DO NOT TRIM FAT. This adds flavor, and no other fat will be needed. 3. Fry in large heavy skillet, turning lean away from hottest point of skillet. 4. Fry slowly. Do not over fry. This will make ham hard, dry and tough. Turn slices often. Ham is usually done when fat is transparent and beginning to brown. 5. For milder or less salty taste, soak in lukewarm water or sweet milk for up to 30 minutes before frying.


http://www.fatherscountryhams.com/recipes.asp

Country Fried Ham
Ham should be sliced about 1/4 of an inch thick.Trim off rind and the dark outer edge of meat side. Do not trim off fat; this adds flavor in frying and no shortening is needed.Put slices with fat toward the center in medium hot, heavy skillet (340 degrees electric skillet), turning several times while frying. Warning: Do not over-fry, as it will become hard and dry. Fry about 4 minutes.If the ham is higher in salt content than desired, soak in sweet milk about a half hour before frying and add brown sugar while frying. The brown sugar adds color and flavor to the red gravy.


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:20:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By OilyPablo:
Originally Posted By delemorte:
Originally Posted By OilyPablo:
Wow great price. No way do we have that here.

My buddy from Va said he would soak them in milk.




never heard that.. sounds like the milk would spoil..


I think just the final soak and it was in the fridge. He gave me some, it was delicious.

http://www.newsomscountryham.com/howtopreprec.html

FRIED KENTUCKY COUNTRY HAM 1. Slice ham about 1/4 inch thick. 2. Trim off hard outer edge of meat and remove rind. DO NOT TRIM FAT. This adds flavor, and no other fat will be needed. 3. Fry in large heavy skillet, turning lean away from hottest point of skillet. 4. Fry slowly. Do not over fry. This will make ham hard, dry and tough. Turn slices often. Ham is usually done when fat is transparent and beginning to brown. 5. For milder or less salty taste, soak in lukewarm water or sweet milk for up to 30 minutes before frying.


http://www.fatherscountryhams.com/recipes.asp

Country Fried Ham
Ham should be sliced about 1/4 of an inch thick.Trim off rind and the dark outer edge of meat side. Do not trim off fat; this adds flavor in frying and no shortening is needed.Put slices with fat toward the center in medium hot, heavy skillet (340 degrees electric skillet), turning several times while frying. Warning: Do not over-fry, as it will become hard and dry. Fry about 4 minutes.If the ham is higher in salt content than desired, soak in sweet milk about a half hour before frying and add brown sugar while frying. The brown sugar adds color and flavor to the red gravy.





Thanks to a man from Wa. that understands what "country ham" is about.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:35:35 PM EST
Why are you soaking it?

When I lived in Kentucky, we would have the butcher cut the mold off, slice it into pieces. Then we would fry it and eat it on a biscuit. No need to waterlog that poor ham.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:40:36 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 5:42:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 5:44:01 PM EST by badeffect10]
What's with all this re-hydrating shit I see in all these country ham threads. Slice it about a quarter of an inch think, fry it, throw a couple of slices on a biscuit with butter, and go to town.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:17:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/21/2012 6:24:12 AM EST by thatguy]
I am also confused on why you 're-hydrate' the ham... I assume once hydrated you have to cook it fast - i got the answer i think - you rehydrate it only so you can bake it WHOLE like a normal ham

Normally i slice and cook it in a skillet with some water to help get the salt out.. I may also soak a few slices ahead of time if im that well prepared..


Has anyone ever BAKED a country ham? I was given one for a christmas present (only those in the South understand what a prize this is as a present).. A co-workers wife baked it just like regular ham and it was DELICIOUS... it was very juicy (like a regular ham) but had the salty taste of a country ham.

BUT as it baked some of the salt came out of it and i bet there was 1/2" of salt laying in the bottom of the pan..

Brian
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:20:24 AM EST
"Kentucky" country ham?

wat?
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:21:17 AM EST
found this recipe for cooking a rehydrated country ham

recipe
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:30:22 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:37:08 AM EST


My mom is from Kentucky (as am I), so I've had a few country hams over the years, and I've had them soaked and unsoaked.

Right now I have a tasty Broadbent ham in the basement. Broadbents are from Cadiz Ky. Gift from my parents when I bought my new house a few years ago. It only gets better with time.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:03:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By badeffect10:
What's with all this re-hydrating shit I see in all these country ham threads. Slice it about a quarter of an inch think, fry it, throw a couple of slices on a biscuit with butter, and go to town.


Done that. This is better.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:07:35 AM EST
Cider vinegar will take the mold off of meat too. My venison and elk usually end up with mold on them after I age it. Vinegar on a rag wipes it right off.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:08:45 AM EST
Dont soak it if you want but a un soaked vs a soaked ham is like comparing boones farm to fine wine.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:09:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
Originally Posted By badeffect10:
What's with all this re-hydrating shit I see in all these country ham threads. Slice it about a quarter of an inch think, fry it, throw a couple of slices on a biscuit with butter, and go to town.


Done that. This is better.

Yup. Those that have not simply dont understand.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:27:52 AM EST
dobra shunka
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 7:31:03 AM EST
Country ham
Biscuits
Grits
Red eye gravy
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 7:03:15 AM EST
To conclude.











Link Posted: 11/23/2012 7:25:30 AM EST
Now I'm hungry. Thanks for all the pics.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 7:26:06 AM EST
Looks good op

To the guys that carve off abit and fry it up –– does this force you to consume the rest of the ham ?

Seems like a cured ham like this would be good for preps if carving off what you need doesn't ruin the rest of ham
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 8:11:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By LowBeta:


My mom is from Kentucky (as am I), so I've had a few country hams over the years, and I've had them soaked and unsoaked.

Right now I have a tasty Broadbent ham in the basement. Broadbents are from Cadiz Ky. Gift from my parents when I bought my new house a few years ago. It only gets better with time.


The Broadbents bacon is absolutely positively fantastic goodness.
My Aunt and Uncle own a farm in NJ and sell that bacon. Last time I went she gave me a bag full of applewood smoked broadbents bacon
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 10:19:20 AM EST
I'm from Hopkinsville, right up the road from Cadiz and I can confirm that the Broadbents probably make the best country ham you'll ever get in western Kentucky!
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 10:29:33 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 2:06:31 PM EST
Originally Posted By 69cutlass:
Looks good op

To the guys that carve off abit and fry it up –– does this force you to consume the rest of the ham ?

Seems like a cured ham like this would be good for preps if carving off what you need doesn't ruin the rest of ham


not at all. the end you cut just becomes a crust eventually.
Link Posted: 11/23/2012 2:44:08 PM EST
That looks delicious!

Gimme a warm ciabata roll, or some real Italian bread, some German mustard and a beer. All set.
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