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Posted: 2/22/2007 5:45:11 PM EDT
I bought my girlfriends 2003 civic EX. It has 102,000 miles but she gave me a good deal on it. No problems whatsoever but Iam wondering if there is anything I need to look out for with the higher miles. This is my first honda so its foreign to me.
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 6:02:15 PM EDT
If its anything like mine, its good for another 100,000+ miles.
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 6:05:56 PM EDT
TIMING BELT ASAP
If that breaks you will damage the valves
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 6:11:19 PM EDT
Is changing the timing belt an extensive job? Looks cramped under the hood.
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 7:20:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
Is changing the timing belt an extensive job? Looks cramped under the hood.


Sort of...changing the belt alone is about a 3 hour job. You are working in tight quarters and unless you have a kick ass impact gun there is a special tool required to remove the bolt on the crank pulley.

There are also other considerations besides the belt itself. Honda Civics have a Water Pump that's driven off the timing belt, and 90% of the time I recommend that you replace the pump, especially with 100K -or more- miles.

There is also a timing belt tensioner that has to be checked. They are pretty robust though, you just need to check the bearing for smooth operation.

The last thing you have to check when doing this job are the oil seals. There's one on the camshaft and one on the crankshaft. If they are dry then you're good to go. Any sign of oil seepage and they have to be changed.

I wouldn't recommend this as a DIY job if it's your intention. As you can see there's more to it than just changing the belt. This is also an 'interference motor' and a mistake could cost you a few bent valves.

A job like this should run you anywhere from $350-$450 at a shop.

Good Luck with your new vehicle, it should last many trouble-free years with routine maintenance.

Link Posted: 2/23/2007 9:02:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
Is changing the timing belt an extensive job? Looks cramped under the hood.


My 01 just rolled 100K a few months ago. I'm nearing 105K now.  I had ALL the belts replace.  I think it was timing, ac compressor, ps, water pump and alternator.  That, a valve adjustment, tranny fluid flush and radiator flush ran me a little under $700 at the Honda dealer where I bought it from.  I always use valvoline to change the oil, but for all the other stuff that honda suggests "requires" their fluids I just go to Honda to play it safe.  The car with 100K still starts everytime,  clutch still feels new and light,  shifting through the gears is smooth as butter.  No real get up and go, but plenty for around town, and it'll cruise at 80mph all day on the highway.  The only things that don't work now are the auto down window (power windows still work) and the door locks.  They click but I think a plastic piece inside is broken.  I need to get the door puller tool and pop the panels off and take a look.  I would suggest getting the full size Bible version of the service manual.  I think manchesterhonda.com sells it.  Definately worth the money.  

The Civic is also a car that you will enjoy to drive.  It's light and handles decent.  It's just easy to drive.  I paid mine off a few years ago and will keep it forever.  My 5 month old will probably be driving it as his first car 16 years from now.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 9:13:32 AM EDT
I miss my civic
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 8:31:14 PM EDT
I think I'll get some money saved and do the dealer route. I do enough wrenching at work.

I love the car so far and new I would since I had driven it many times before. My prior daily driver was a 92 F150. I commute 20 miles altogether to and from work. Needless to say I'll save gas

When my truck wouldnt start a while back I had rented a chevy cobalt. Id say these two cars are in the same class but you could tell the honda was higher quality even though it has much more miles and was 2 years older than the cobalt. The only thing I liked better about the cobalt was getting in and out of it was easier.
Link Posted: 2/24/2007 12:01:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
I think I'll get some money saved and do the dealer route. I do enough wrenching at work.

I love the car so far and new I would since I had driven it many times before. My prior daily driver was a 92 F150. I commute 20 miles altogether to and from work. Needless to say I'll save gas

When my truck wouldnt start a while back I had rented a chevy cobalt. Id say these two cars are in the same class but you could tell the honda was higher quality even though it has much more miles and was 2 years older than the cobalt. The only thing I liked better about the cobalt was getting in and out of it was easier.

My girlfriend's mom has a Cobalt.  It's real nice.
Link Posted: 2/24/2007 3:44:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Deej86:

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
I think I'll get some money saved and do the dealer route. I do enough wrenching at work.

I love the car so far and new I would since I had driven it many times before. My prior daily driver was a 92 F150. I commute 20 miles altogether to and from work. Needless to say I'll save gas

When my truck wouldnt start a while back I had rented a chevy cobalt. Id say these two cars are in the same class but you could tell the honda was higher quality even though it has much more miles and was 2 years older than the cobalt. The only thing I liked better about the cobalt was getting in and out of it was easier.

My girlfriend's mom has a Cobalt.  It's real nice.


+1; The Cobalt just keeps getting better and better each year. I'd say it along with the Civic and Mazda3 are the top three cars in that segment...
Link Posted: 2/24/2007 3:57:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
I think I'll get some money saved and do the dealer route. I do enough wrenching at work.

I love the car so far and new I would since I had driven it many times before. My prior daily driver was a 92 F150. I commute 20 miles altogether to and from work. Needless to say I'll save gas

When my truck wouldnt start a while back I had rented a chevy cobalt. Id say these two cars are in the same class but you could tell the honda was higher quality even though it has much more miles and was 2 years older than the cobalt. The only thing I liked better about the cobalt was getting in and out of it was easier.


Get used to filling up once every month then.  The range I get is about 400 miles per tank, and don't be shocked when the gas pump shuts off at about 12 gallons, cause that's nearly all it'll hold.

Not trying to scare you, but it's the truth.
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