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Posted: 6/16/2007 3:21:52 PM EST
5:15 live from 1996. Wait for his solo about 5 minutes in.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:23:24 PM EST
With all due respect to you and Mr. Entwistle, the greatest bass player who ever walked this earth was Jaco Pastorius.

I am assuming that you are referring to electric bass players, not upright bassists. That is another matter altogether.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:25:13 PM EST
Stanley Clarke is really good too
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:26:26 PM EST
I wouldn't go as far as the best but Entwistle was badassed
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:26:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 6:33:57 PM EST by x_varmits]
1 vote for:

Chris Squire (YES)



ETA from the YES website:

The Rickenbacker 4001 is the hallmark of Chris Squire's career and bass sound. He purchased the model 1999 bass (serial number DC127) in 1965 while an employee of Boosey and Hawkes, LTD, a musical instrument retail business. It was the fourth bass of its kind to be imported into England (Rickenbacker is an American guitar manufacturer). Allegedly, the first three had pedigrees themselves, as Chris remembers, "Entwistle had one, the guy in the Kinks [Pete Quaife] had one, and Donovan had one."

He has used the same bass ever since, through his stint with the Syn, Mable Greer's Toyshop and throughout his recordings and performances with Yes.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:26:50 PM EST
steve harris owns all wanna be bass players.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:29:15 PM EST
Love watching old Who clips when Moon and Townsend would be tearing apart their instruments, Entwistle can be seen backing up protecting his bass.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:29:39 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:30:53 PM EST
as much as i love cliff burton, harris is way better. they both kick john entwistle in the balls.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 6:58:51 PM EST
The best bassists are the ones you don't notice. They serve the song, instead of dance on it. Bass as a solo instrument is like garnish as a main dish. Only garnish fans appreciate it.

Entwistle was a very good utilitarian bassist, even when showing his chops. He played within the structure of the song, making it better.

That's a good bassist. Best? Dunno, but he was a great musician.

The two guys from Ned's Atomic Dustbin were pretty damn cool IMHO - having two bass players and that forming the nucleus of a band's sound was something really rare in the music world, totally unique.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:02:41 PM EST
awesome !
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:05:19 PM EST
Les Calypool is pretty badass
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:06:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:
The best bassists are the ones you don't notice. They serve the song, instead of dance on it.


Amen to that.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:08:30 PM EST
This post shall not go past page 1 without mentioning geddy lee
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:12:55 PM EST
Tony Levin gets my vote. Anybody that can play the Chapman Stick is O.K. in my book.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:14:42 PM EST
Victor Wooten. But don't take my word for it! link
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:17:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:27:25 PM EST
I vote Billy Sheehan.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:32:02 PM EST
Rex


No contest.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:42:00 PM EST
Everybody's wrong so far. When Stuart Hamm plays, the rest of these punks are taking notes......
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:48:40 PM EST
Whether serving songs or adding garnish, Flea doesn't do so bad...

[hijack] Saw the Police in concert last Wed. night, Andy Summers is gettin' a little old. Stewart Copeland still has the baddest (sooooo syncopated) chops of all drummers currently living. Sting can still play the bass and sing, he apparently doesn't age. [/hijack]

/TCP
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:51:52 PM EST
I bet I'm the only one that clicked on the link, before posting up someone elses name that absolutely no one has heard of saying they are best. no proof as usual. John Entwhistle from mid 60s to when he died was a great bass player. Longevity is the key to greatness.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:52:25 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:54:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 7:55:12 PM EST by ReallyLongAction]
This guy is the definition of a great bassist:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geddy_Lee

The greatest IMO.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 7:59:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hipster:
With all due respect to you and Mr. Entwistle, the greatest bass player who ever walked this earth was Jaco Pastorius.

I am assuming that you are referring to electric bass players, not upright bassists. That is another matter altogether.


Yes, Jaco is incredible but we are overlooking Phil Lesh. Lets not confuse bass players who can hold down a great base line in a rock and roll band with someone who actually knows who how to play the instrument in a complex/improvisational fashion with soul.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 8:04:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hipster:
With all due respect to you and Mr. Entwistle, the greatest bass player who ever walked this earth was Jaco Pastorius.

I am assuming that you are referring to electric bass players, not upright bassists. That is another matter altogether.


Agreed.

<--- bass player far worse than any of those mentioned so far.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 8:11:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:
The best bassists are the ones you don't notice. They serve the song, instead of dance on it. Bass as a solo instrument is like garnish as a main dish. Only garnish fans appreciate it.

Entwistle was a very good utilitarian bassist, even when showing his chops. He played within the structure of the song, making it better.

That's a good bassist. Best? Dunno, but he was a great musician.

The two guys from Ned's Atomic Dustbin were pretty damn cool IMHO - having two bass players and that forming the nucleus of a band's sound was something really rare in the music world, totally unique.


+1.

You're officially my hero now.

Trim those fucking hedges out front. I'm going to start hanging out there next week.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:03:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tazaroo:

Originally Posted By Hipster:
With all due respect to you and Mr. Entwistle, the greatest bass player who ever walked this earth was Jaco Pastorius.

I am assuming that you are referring to electric bass players, not upright bassists. That is another matter altogether.


Yes, Jaco is incredible but we are overlooking Phil Lesh. Lets not confuse bass players who can hold down a great base line in a rock and roll band with someone who actually knows who how to play the instrument in a complex/improvisational fashion with soul.


Before he got known as a jazz player, Jaco did a pretty good job of laying down a bass line when he played with Wayne Cochran & his C. C. Riders.

For a solid, lay-it-down bass player, I vote for Donald "Duck" Dunn. A lot of folks on this forum might not know his name but they've heard and dug his bass lines a thousand times.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:15:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 9:16:08 PM EST by Daytona955i]

Originally Posted By swingset:
The best bassists are the ones you don't notice. They serve the song, instead of dance on it. Bass as a solo instrument is like garnish as a main dish. Only garnish fans appreciate it.

Entwistle was a very good utilitarian bassist, even when showing his chops. He played within the structure of the song, making it better.

That's a good bassist. Best? Dunno, but he was a great musician.

The two guys from Ned's Atomic Dustbin were pretty damn cool IMHO - having two bass players and that forming the nucleus of a band's sound was something really rare in the music world, totally unique.


I both agree with you, and think you're so far off at the same time.

It's bass, you're right you don't dance on the song, you dance under it. Bass is the foundation for everything else. Bridging melody and rhythm. The best bass players DO get noticed, but not because of how many notes they can play, a lot of playing bass has to do with the notes you don't play, and how you interact with the drums and guitar but don't follow.

You have to know when to add to a song and when not to detract from it.

To compare it to garnish... you don't even eat the garnish.

Bass is at least the baked potato with your steak.

And yeah, I play a lot of bass.

Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:16:40 PM EST
No ones mentioned Les Claypool yet?
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:18:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 9:19:58 PM EST by Daytona955i]
It's hard to pick a favorite, John Paul Jones is the one that influenced me the most.

Stu Hamm and Victor Wooten have awesome chops though.

James Jamerson and Jaco get honorable mention.

Les Claypool is the most creative and fantastic lead player, just a prodigy, amazing musician, wish I could play as well as him.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:30:22 PM EST
Cliff Burton by a nose, over Entwistle by a nose, over Steve Harris; today. Tomorrow that order could change due to a variety of unforseen variables, but the top 3 would remain those 3.
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:35:01 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:37:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2007 9:38:32 PM EST by DrFrige]
Link Posted: 6/16/2007 9:37:42 PM EST
i like pantera as much as the next guy, but rex should not be mentioned in a discussion about whos the best bass player.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 9:59:30 AM EST

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:

Originally Posted By swingset:
The best bassists are the ones you don't notice. They serve the song, instead of dance on it. Bass as a solo instrument is like garnish as a main dish. Only garnish fans appreciate it.

Entwistle was a very good utilitarian bassist, even when showing his chops. He played within the structure of the song, making it better.

That's a good bassist. Best? Dunno, but he was a great musician.

The two guys from Ned's Atomic Dustbin were pretty damn cool IMHO - having two bass players and that forming the nucleus of a band's sound was something really rare in the music world, totally unique.


I both agree with you, and think you're so far off at the same time.

It's bass, you're right you don't dance on the song, you dance under it. Bass is the foundation for everything else. Bridging melody and rhythm. The best bass players DO get noticed, but not because of how many notes they can play, a lot of playing bass has to do with the notes you don't play, and how you interact with the drums and guitar but don't follow.

You have to know when to add to a song and when not to detract from it.

To compare it to garnish... you don't even eat the garnish.

Bass is at least the baked potato with your steak.

And yeah, I play a lot of bass.



Only bass fans get off on technical bass players. The rest of the world, 99.995% of it, are listening to the song. They don't care if the bassist is good, only that the song is. So, within the confines of a great song, a good bass player serves the song. Whether that means double-tapping harmonics while keeping a low-note throbbing, or just hitting an open A for 4 bars, a good bass player serves the music. Some of my favorite bassists were technically proficient, but seldom showed it. Tom Peterson of Cheap Trick was that way, he can really play, but the songs seldom called for it so he served the song. Michael Anthony is that way, too. His playing didn't set the world on fire, but it enhanced VH's sound tremendously...without fanfare.

Now, if you want to talk about mastubatory noodling, that's a whole different area of music - and to be frank something that I don't care for no matter who's doing it. To my years, all bass played that way sounds goofy. Les Claypool is proficient, dazzling even, but to sit and listen to that? Fuck, it's like listening to a die-grinder for entertainment.

I still think bass is best when subtle, seasoning on a great meal. Sometimes it makes the meal, sometimes you don't even know it's there.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:09:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:

Only bass fans get off on technical bass players. The rest of the world, 99.995% of it, are listening to the song. They don't care if the bassist is good, only that the song is.


I'd say that bass players listen for the bass line and focus on it, picking out nuances and seeing how it grooves (does the average lpayer today groove?).

Everybody else listens to the song, tapping their toes and dancing, oblivious to the bass line that's driving them.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:31:13 AM EST
Les Claypool.
Although my opinion may be skewed due to my love for all that is Primus, mixed with my inability to even name a Rush song.

Primus is a bass band, like swingset said, its like garnish as the main course, but it seems to work with this band.

PRIMUS - LACQUERHEAD

1:08 is especially badass.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:35:20 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:38:06 AM EST
Victor Wooten or Billy Sheehan.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:43:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/17/2007 10:47:07 AM EST by Daytona955i]

Originally Posted By swingset:


Only bass fans get off on technical bass players. The rest of the world, 99.995% of it, are listening to the song. They don't care if the bassist is good, only that the song is. So, within the confines of a great song, a good bass player serves the song. Whether that means double-tapping harmonics while keeping a low-note throbbing, or just hitting an open A for 4 bars, a good bass player serves the music. Some of my favorite bassists were technically proficient, but seldom showed it. Tom Peterson of Cheap Trick was that way, he can really play, but the songs seldom called for it so he served the song. Michael Anthony is that way, too. His playing didn't set the world on fire, but it enhanced VH's sound tremendously...without fanfare.

Now, if you want to talk about mastubatory noodling, that's a whole different area of music - and to be frank something that I don't care for no matter who's doing it. To my years, all bass played that way sounds goofy. Les Claypool is proficient, dazzling even, but to sit and listen to that? Fuck, it's like listening to a die-grinder for entertainment.

I still think bass is best when subtle, seasoning on a great meal. Sometimes it makes the meal, sometimes you don't even know it's there.



Hey if that's what you believe, cool. However to think that its best to not be able to notice it, you're not really listening to the bass player. Which is fine, I know before I played bass I didn't notice it as much, now I can pick it out along with everything else.

I agree that people that don't play bass don't really care about highly technical bass skills, but to say that the best bass players are those that "you don't even know (are ) there" just sounds very ignorant of music. If you can't hear what the bass player is doing in (most) music, you're not listening to the groove, and you aren't listening to the music as a whole, you're just listening to the guitar hook and lyrics.

Technical ability and being a great bass player are not the same thing, but to disregard the contributions of a good bass player... Have you ever listened to a live rock band without a bass player or at least a bass part from a keyboard or something? Usually sounds crappy, with some exceptions.

I'm not trying to offend you, I'm not fundamentally disagreeing with you, but I think a good bass player is supportive and not overbearing, but you just make it seem like if you mixed it out it wouldn't make any difference, when in reality mixing out the bass in most music is going to destroy the song and if you listened to your favorite tunes written with a bass player played without that part they would absolutely suck the big one.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 10:52:06 AM EST
John Myung

Link Posted: 6/17/2007 11:00:35 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 11:18:53 AM EST
Id say the bassist I enjoy the most and notice the most is Fieldy from Korn. It may not be complicated to play or appeal to the masses but it definetly grabs your ears.

Why do the lead singer types in bands have to get all the attention?


Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:19:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By Daytona955i:

Originally Posted By swingset:


Only bass fans get off on technical bass players. The rest of the world, 99.995% of it, are listening to the song. They don't care if the bassist is good, only that the song is. So, within the confines of a great song, a good bass player serves the song. Whether that means double-tapping harmonics while keeping a low-note throbbing, or just hitting an open A for 4 bars, a good bass player serves the music. Some of my favorite bassists were technically proficient, but seldom showed it. Tom Peterson of Cheap Trick was that way, he can really play, but the songs seldom called for it so he served the song. Michael Anthony is that way, too. His playing didn't set the world on fire, but it enhanced VH's sound tremendously...without fanfare.

Now, if you want to talk about mastubatory noodling, that's a whole different area of music - and to be frank something that I don't care for no matter who's doing it. To my years, all bass played that way sounds goofy. Les Claypool is proficient, dazzling even, but to sit and listen to that? Fuck, it's like listening to a die-grinder for entertainment.

I still think bass is best when subtle, seasoning on a great meal. Sometimes it makes the meal, sometimes you don't even know it's there.



Hey if that's what you believe, cool. However to think that its best to not be able to notice it, you're not really listening to the bass player. Which is fine, I know before I played bass I didn't notice it as much, now I can pick it out along with everything else.

I agree that people that don't play bass don't really care about highly technical bass skills, but to say that the best bass players are those that "you don't even know (are ) there" just sounds very ignorant of music. If you can't hear what the bass player is doing in (most) music, you're not listening to the groove, and you aren't listening to the music as a whole, you're just listening to the guitar hook and lyrics.

Technical ability and being a great bass player are not the same thing, but to disregard the contributions of a good bass player... Have you ever listened to a live rock band without a bass player or at least a bass part from a keyboard or something? Usually sounds crappy, with some exceptions.

I'm not trying to offend you, I'm not fundamentally disagreeing with you, but I think a good bass player is supportive and not overbearing, but you just make it seem like if you mixed it out it wouldn't make any difference, when in reality mixing out the bass in most music is going to destroy the song and if you listened to your favorite tunes written with a bass player played without that part they would absolutely suck the big one.


You're misunderstanding me completely. I don't like music without a bass player, nor do I think the instrument should be transparent. In some songs, it IS the song....but it should only serve the song....not the other way around.

I don't think the bass should be, in most music, a dominant or solo instrument. I think the bass is the foundation of the song, not the roof & siding.

That's all. I've been playing and writing music for 25 years, and I'm a pretty good bassist....I appreciate what it takes to be good, I just don't want to listen to a bass player stomp on a good arrangement.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:22:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zakk_Wylde_470:
libsyn.com/images/basscast/cliff-1.jpg


Fixed for you.

When Zakk Wyde 470 and I agree on anything it must compelling enough to be black letter law.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:23:35 PM EST
Kip Winger


Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:24:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By streetfighter:
www.speaker-mag.de/photo/Motorhead/Lemmy_Kilmister_10_02_6.jpg



Lemmy is not the best bass player. Lemmy is God.

Everything in this world is a Motorhead ripoff, including Elvis.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:27:47 PM EST
A huge +1 on Chris Squire. A real genius.

Originally Posted By x_varmits:
1 vote for:

Chris Squire (YES)



ETA from the YES website:

The Rickenbacker 4001 is the hallmark of Chris Squire's career and bass sound. He purchased the model 1999 bass (serial number DC127) in 1965 while an employee of Boosey and Hawkes, LTD, a musical instrument retail business. It was the fourth bass of its kind to be imported into England (Rickenbacker is an American guitar manufacturer). Allegedly, the first three had pedigrees themselves, as Chris remembers, "Entwistle had one, the guy in the Kinks [Pete Quaife] had one, and Donovan had one."

He has used the same bass ever since, through his stint with the Syn, Mable Greer's Toyshop and throughout his recordings and performances with Yes.
Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:33:34 PM EST
Charlie Hunter plays bass and guitar at the same time.

5 guitar strings, 3 bass strings. He can probably sleep and drive at the same time, too.

Does he belong in the thread? Eh, probably not. So sue me.

Link Posted: 6/17/2007 6:40:43 PM EST
Swingset has has it right on the money, except that if you are a bassist you will definately notice them- that is if you are a bassist on the right track.

There are a lot of great bassists out there, I don't think picking a best one is even possible. Bass does not have the wide range that some other instruments do.
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