Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
User Panel

Site Notices
Posted: 1/24/2009 10:10:28 PM EDT
I need a machine to do a couple simple tasks.  To be exact, I want a machine to measure OAL of reloads, and to weigh them, accepting them or rejecting them based upon input parameters.

Are there companies or people who could build plans for me for me to build it myself?  On the cheap?
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 10:14:49 PM EDT
[#1]
Are there people that do that, yes. On the cheap, no.

A good bet is to talk to a machine design professor at the local engineering school and have them figure it out for grades and you pay for parts. We did that all the time when I was in school.
Link Posted: 1/24/2009 10:41:06 PM EDT
[#2]
To be honest, for an one-off machine, plans are probably overkill and expensive. A couple of light beams/sensors to set min/max length acceptance criteria and the digital scale both as inputs to a programmable logic controller. The output mechanisms would be two pneumatic pushers to either slide the round into the good or the rejected bin. It is a semi-automatic system as it requires a user to insert each individual round into the testing station unless you wanted to try and design a controlled-feed hopper that could reliably place the round correctly on the pan (much more involved). Also, you would have to establish separately whether each round was rejected for weight or length issues if important.

The only mechanical questions with the system as described that I see are:
1) whether the deflection variation of the digital scale pan between min and max weight would affect significantly the apparent length of the round to the light beams mounted independently of the scale.
2) if the light beams are mechanically linked to the scale pan to better control the length, whether the additional weight on the pan would affect the scale's accuracy

Both of these are pretty straight-forward to a sharp engineering undergraduate student, and the electrical side is pretty straightforward as well. If you decide that you want plans or wiring diagrams without high cost, you might be able to put up fliers at the engineering department in a local university to provide a side project for some student. Of course, they could probably build it as well. Otherwise, prototyping and design companies exist. I can recommend a few good ones out here in the West or one in Wisconsin if you wish. They are reasonably-priced compared to their competition; however, the cost will be significantly higher than the student route.
Link Posted: 1/25/2009 8:53:30 AM EDT
[#3]
Quoted:
To be honest, for an one-off machine, plans are probably overkill and expensive. A couple of light beams/sensors to set min/max length acceptance criteria and the digital scale both as inputs to a programmable logic controller. The output mechanisms would be two pneumatic pushers to either slide the round into the good or the rejected bin. It is a semi-automatic system as it requires a user to insert each individual round into the testing station unless you wanted to try and design a controlled-feed hopper that could reliably place the round correctly on the pan (much more involved). Also, you would have to establish separately whether each round was rejected for weight or length issues if important.

The only mechanical questions with the system as described that I see are:
1) whether the deflection variation of the digital scale pan between min and max weight would affect significantly the apparent length of the round to the light beams mounted independently of the scale.
2) if the light beams are mechanically linked to the scale pan to better control the length, whether the additional weight on the pan would affect the scale's accuracy

Both of these are pretty straight-forward to a sharp engineering undergraduate student, and the electrical side is pretty straightforward as well. If you decide that you want plans or wiring diagrams without high cost, you might be able to put up fliers at the engineering department in a local university to provide a side project for some student. Of course, they could probably build it as well. Otherwise, prototyping and design companies exist. I can recommend a few good ones out here in the West or one in Wisconsin if you wish. They are reasonably-priced compared to their competition; however, the cost will be significantly higher than the student route.


Would you have a ballpark figure for cost?  I really have no idea.  Hundreds?  Thousands?  Tens of thousands?

Thank you for that.

Link Posted: 1/25/2009 11:15:29 AM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:

Would you have a ballpark figure for cost?  I really have no idea.  Hundreds?  Thousands?  Tens of thousands?

Thank you for that.



It gets expensive in a hurry. Especially if you go to a pro shop instead of students. Parts, labor, machining etc. The parts alone will be around a thousand, if you are thrifty.

Do you plan on doing the machining yourself? What about the machining?

If you want to get an idea of the cost of automation components, take a look at Automation Direct. They are at the low end of automation suppliers.

I've always thought that making an automated reloading press would be a lot of fun, but never seem to have the time. It would be nice because most of the mechanical components are already built so few would have to be custom manufactured. Plus, it would be really cool to watch the machine crank out loaded ammo Unfortunately, I never seem to have the time.
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top