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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/1/2005 3:06:53 PM EDT
I came home to find one of the main branches on a maple in the front yard split off today.

I'm wondering if anything can be done to save the tree.

I know the first order of business is to get the split off limb cut off to prevent further damage to the tree.








Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:08:35 PM EDT
Cut the limb off and seal the wound.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:10:07 PM EDT
looks pretty bad, I would cut it down
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:12:49 PM EDT
That wound looks pretty bad. Cut down the limb until it is flush with the main trunk and wait and see. An injury that large to a sugar maple isn't good.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:17:18 PM EDT
That tree is toast, I'd be suprised to see it make it to Feb. of next year. Too bad, It looked like a great little tree.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:19:40 PM EDT
You've got nothing to lose by cutting off that limb flush and waiting to see. Don't seal it, that just delays healing. If the tree lives, great. If not, firewood.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:21:20 PM EDT
It'll survive. You'll be sorry though, when that tree starts dropping those damn helocopter thingys all over. Those trees are SO dirty.
CJ

Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:39:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:40:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 3:41:55 PM EDT by chrome1]
Cable it higher up to pull the leader back against the trunk .
then drill and bolt it ( Bracing )

Reasonably common practice for poorly structured trees like this
and from the look of the other crotches you should probably
cable all the leaders in a crisscross or box pattern before
they let go .

You can get the cabling and bracing hardware at
most larger home and garden supply places .
Some even rent the long wood auger drill bits .
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:41:31 PM EDT
Shove a pop can full of tannerite in that space and go back about 100 yards.

Then shoot it, get it all on video tape so we can watch.


I bet it blows it clean off.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:43:43 PM EDT
Tree is done. We have many maples on our golf course. Big branches break and split, usually okay. One like that is going to cause it to rot from the inside. At most you probably have 6 years or so.

You can build a "canopy" or "umbrella" shielding direct water from the wound. This might prolong the life. But eventually, you're gonna have a rotten tree that's gonna fall and possibly hurt or kill someone.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:45:20 PM EDT
Done, cut it down.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:48:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:56:44 PM EDT
I once fixed a splitting tree like that once. It wasn't quite that bad, but it was still pretty bad. I went out and bought some ready rod from the local hardware store and the biggest nuts and washers I could find. I was able to pull the tree together and it eventually healed. You will have to frequently apply insecticide (fore bores) and fungucide. No guarentees though, so you may be better off to just get out the chainsaw.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 3:57:47 PM EDT
I would try the cable and turnbuckle idea..get it tight it may heal and grow back together. have you ever seen a tree grow oround a fence or such, same idea . It may take a few years but what have you got to loose by trying?
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:05:34 PM EDT
I'd try to cable it back together to try to save it.

One thing you should do that nobody mentioned is that something made it split. I'd trim the branches back on the injured side to take some weight off. I'd also suspend some lines to the other side high up to relieve some pressure as well.

I'd also trim the other side to prevent the same thing from happening. There is some good info on this from the PBS "This Old House" series that talk about modern trimming and and the best way to prune branches. It deals with the "3" cut method.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:21:08 PM EDT
awwww poor tree
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 4:27:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rtech:
I'd try to cable it back together to try to save it.

One thing you should do that nobody mentioned is that something made it split. I'd trim the branches back on the injured side to take some weight off. I'd also suspend some lines to the other side high up to relieve some pressure as well.

I'd also trim the other side to prevent the same thing from happening. There is some good info on this from the PBS "This Old House" series that talk about modern trimming and and the best way to prune branches. It deals with the "3" cut method.

Good luck.



That's what I was thinking too. It even looks like something has started rotting it from the inside in the picture. Maybe some kind of fungus, or borers?

If you do try to save it, get one of those "tree feeders". Mine has a little bubble on the side that takes a fertilizer pellet. Water runs over it, dissolving it and taking it down to the roots. You might be able to get some fertilizer/fungicide for it too.
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