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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/26/2006 12:41:24 PM EDT
you see that video?

IRL said it was a full speed 200mph versus almost standstill car by that time and that Dana's car was literally SPLIT IN HALF by the impact. Anyone know why he didn't slow down at the yellow?

Heard he left a wife behind too. RIP.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 12:44:33 PM EDT
I heard it on the news.

Is there any linky to some kind of video-thingy?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 12:47:45 PM EDT
it's on foxnews.com front page. I can't link to java though sorry.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 12:52:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 12:59:41 PM EDT
ESPN Motion has a video story of it..I think they have the crash but I can't download their app at work
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 1:01:11 PM EDT
Just watched it.... ouch...

Anyone remember the old Indy500 computer game in which you could crash just like that?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 1:07:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 10:43:42 AM EDT by VoodooChile]
OK.. I found a straight link to the video of the wreck..poor bastard didn't even touch the brakes

sports.espn.go.com/rpm/news/story?seriesId=1&id=2384873

old link doesn't show it anymore

www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-irl27mar27,1,2758110.story?coll=la-headlines-sports
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 3:32:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
OK.. I found a straight link to the video of the wreck..poor bastard didn't even touch the brakes

sports.espn.go.com/rpm/news/story?seriesId=1&id=2384873



there was definite time to slow down from teh yellows. rookie error? poor guy, poor family.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 3:34:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 3:38:54 PM EDT by Napoleon_Tanerite]

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
OK.. I found a straight link to the video of the wreck..poor bastard didn't even touch the brakes

sports.espn.go.com/rpm/news/story?seriesId=1&id=2384873



there was definite time to slow down from teh yellows. rookie error? poor guy, poor family.



that is not his fault. his spotter was 100% directly responsible for his death. the spotter figured the track was under caution and probably didnt tell his driver where the accident car was. If he had seen his car still going too fast he should have told him to slow down. I hope that spotter lies awake every night for the rest of his life with the guilt of killing this poor driver
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 3:35:23 PM EDT
Sad story.

Homestead track was fast before the new banking.
200mph on a 1.5 mile track.
Those cats are flyin'
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 3:39:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
OK.. I found a straight link to the video of the wreck..poor bastard didn't even touch the brakes

sports.espn.go.com/rpm/news/story?seriesId=1&id=2384873



there was definite time to slow down from teh yellows. rookie error? poor guy, poor family.



that is not his fault. his spotter was 100% directly responsible for his death. the spotter figured the track was under caution and probably didnt tell his driver where the accident car was. I hope that spotter lies awake every night for the rest of his life with the guilt of killing this poor driver



That is the classiest thing I have read all day.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:06:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 4:06:44 PM EDT by VoodooChile]

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:

that is not his fault. his spotter was 100% directly responsible for his death. the spotter figured the track was under caution and probably didnt tell his driver where the accident car was. If he had seen his car still going too fast he should have told him to slow down. I hope that spotter lies awake every night for the rest of his life with the guilt of killing this poor driver



Team owner Bobby Rahal says the spotter told Dana about the crash..

www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/motorsports/3749466.html
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:15:02 PM EDT
Damn

It looked and sounded like driver error.

Rahal says the spotter told him, the lights were on and he blew past other drivers that were slowing down.

Damn that sucks.....
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:18:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTUSA:
Sad story.

Homestead track was fast before the new banking.
200mph on a 1.5 mile track.
Those cats are flyin'



They qualified at 218 +

At Texas those cars go 220. I have witnessed some horrific wrecks at TMS. Thankfully no one has died.

I did see the track worker pick Davey Hamilton's feet up off the track. I don't see how he survived, but he did.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:21:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 4:22:02 PM EDT by burbanite]

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:
that is not his fault. his spotter was 100% directly responsible for his death. the spotter figured the track was under caution and probably didnt tell his driver where the accident car was. If he had seen his car still going too fast he should have told him to slow down. I hope that spotter lies awake every night for the rest of his life with the guilt of killing this poor driver




If you had any clue about what you just said then I would be surprised. You are a fucking moron.


I work with Paul's brother. There is always a possibility of this kind of thing happening in our business. Our thoughts are with his family and friends as always in these situations.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:35:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By burbanite:
. Our thoughts are with his family and friends as always in these situations.



Offer up my thoughts and prayers as well.....from just a fan.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:48:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
[Offer up my thoughts and prayers as well.....from just a fan.



Thank you, I'll be sure to do so.

I spoke with my driver after it happened, she had recently been working out with Paul at a local gym, one that many of the Indianapolis based drivers frequent. My concern was for her as a rookie and how it may affect her as she is a relative newcomer in the "bigs". She was extremely sad, but, as these drivers always seem to do, she showed me that life is for living and no-one should be afraid of facing their destiny...

I have been through this on a number of occasions and it never gets any easier. People lose their lives for many reasons, Paul was having fun...
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:49:54 PM EDT
My brother works for Dreyer Reinbold. He talks like the whole league is in free fall. Rookie owners, rookie drivers, lots of sub-par mechanics, etc. My fear is that this isn't the last of these things happening. I hope that this will wake up some people and fix things.

BTW Napoleon_Tanerite, I hope someone your protecting never makes a mistake you can't help. I hope you never have to live with that guilt. And I hope you go away VERY soon.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:51:01 PM EDT
That is so sad. My prayers are with his family. May the peace of the Lord be with them.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 4:54:29 PM EDT
Dont be sad or grieve too bad, the guy died doing what he loved!
What a way to go !
My hats off to him!
I hope I die doing something I love to do!
Rather than die on a couch or in a old folks home
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:01:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By postpostban:
I hope that this will wake up some people and fix things.



I know what you are saying but unfortunately, regardless of the situation, it is a nature of the business. No-one is to blame and no-one will ever take the inherent risk from the sport.

We all just pray that it never happens to us.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:06:36 PM EDT
It was clearly the drivers mistake. I have been at that track and no matter where the driver is on the track they can see the yellow when it is turned on. Its a shame, but many of the IRL drivers have nowhere near the experience drivers did before the split with CART. Neither organization is what it once was before that.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:09:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 5:34:14 PM EDT by Napoleon_Tanerite]
I post about a lot of things on this site, and often i have very little idea what i am talking about, BUT auto racing is one thing that i DO know what i am talking about. i grew up in and around racing. my family has been involved in nearly every aspect of the racing business from crew to owner, sponsor, official, we've done pretty much all of it, including spotting.

All too often spotters check out during caution flags, especially during practice. For whatever reason, if their driver isnt near the wreck when it happens, they will tell him that there's a wreck in turn #, and that's it... time for some water or something. I have seen lots of guys hurt and lots more equipment damaged because some spotter wasn't on top of his game during a caution.

If this is not the case here, i appologize and retract my statement, but i have strong feelings regarding racing safety and no mercy for anyone who would compromise that safety by not doing their job. Once again, my condolences go to the Dana family, and if the spotter was not at fault, i appologize.

edited to clarify what kind of racing i know
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:16:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:
I post about a lot of things on this site, and often i have very little idea what i am talking about, BUT racing is one thing that i DO know what i am talking about. i grew up in and around racing. my family has been involved in nearly every aspect of the racing business from crew to owner, sponsor, official, we've done pretty much all of it, including spotting.

All too often spotters check out during caution flags, especially during practice. For whatever reason, if their driver isnt near the wreck when it happens, they will tell him that there's a wreck in turn #, and that's it... time for some water or something. I have seen lots of guys hurt and lots more equipment damaged because some spotter wasn't on top of his game during a caution.

If this is not the case here, i appologize and retract my statement, but i have strong feelings regarding racing safety and no mercy for anyone who would compromise that safety by not doing their job. Once again, my condolences go to the Dana family, and if the spotter was not at fault, i appologize.



Very fine post N_T.

I will no longer ignore the people who call you a troll in any thread I post in.

My father taught me it take a big man to admit when he is wrong and to say I'm sorry.
He was right, and you are a big man.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:31:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:
BUT racing is one thing that i DO know what i am talking about.



Obviously not enough. There are many racing venues, on land, sea and air, where there is no spotter to watch out for the driver, and speeds are just as high - or higher - than IRL/CART tracks.

Ultimately it is the drivers responsibility. Like someone with a loaded gun. No matter what anyone else does or doesn't do, says or doesn't say, it comes down to the person whose hands are on on the controls.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 7:41:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JeffB:
It was clearly the drivers mistake. I have been at that track and no matter where the driver is on the track they can see the yellow when it is turned on. Its a shame, but many of the IRL drivers have nowhere near the experience drivers did before the split with CART. Neither organization is what it once was before that.



He was a rookie. Everyone has to start somewhere.

I'm a huge Indycar fan, this just sucks. A couple of years ago it was Tony Renna, now it's Paul. Who knows if he ever heard the call from his spotter, if he saw Ed sitting there parked. When I saw it, all I could think of was the Zanardi incident.

RIP and my thoughts and prayers out to his family, friends and the whole Rahal-Letterman team.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:26:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:
auto racing is one thing that i DO know what i am talking about. i grew up in and around racing.



Then you should be really ashamed of yourself.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:43:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:45:43 AM EDT by mr_wilson]
Check your facts before posting.......

www.speedtv.com/articles/auto/indycar/22744/

Tragedy Strikes IRL Opener
Written by: Jeff Olson
Miami, Fla. – 3/26/2006 Paul Dana, 1975 - 2006. (Photo: Getty)

Paul Dana died of multiple injuries Sunday following a crash during a pre-race practice session for the Toyota Indy 300 at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

IRL president and chief operating officer Brian Barnhart made the announcement at 12:45 p.m. Sunday, hours after Dana’s car crashed into Ed Carpenter’s car on the second lap of the final practice session before the IRL IndyCar Series season opener.

Bobby Rahal, co-owner of Rahal Letterman Racing, said Dana’s two teammates would not compete in Sunday’s race, which was scheduled to be held as planned. The No. 15 RLR Honda/Panoz of Danica Patrick and the No. 16 RLR Honda/Panoz of Buddy Rice were parked.

“This is a very black day for us,” Rahal said. “On behalf of our team, David and our sponsors and associates, our prayers and sympathies go out to Paul, his wife, Tonya, and the whole Dana family. This is a great tragedy. As a result, and in honor of him, we will not be competing with cars 15 and 16.”

Dana’s No. 17 RLR Honda/Panoz slammed into Carpenter’s No. 20 Honda/Dallara after Carpenter’s car had spun to a stop in Turn 2 on the second lap of the morning practice session. The yellow flag had been out for several seconds, and several cars had slowed and passed Carpenter’s spinning car, before Dana’s car slammed into it at speed.

Both Rahal and Barnhart said their were no communication issues regarding the crash.

“There was no problem with the communication,” Rahal said. “The spotter made clear the incident. From what I could see, there was a car on the outside that Paul was passing or had just passed. It would be conjecture and probably be very irresponsible for me to dissect why it happened, but there was no problem with the communication.”

Both drivers were airlifted to Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Carpenter, who reportedly was knocked unconscious at impact, was reported to be awake and alert and was listed in stable condition.

Barnhart said caution lights were on, the flag was out and the radio call had been made -- and responded to -- before Dana's car crashed into Carpenter's. Video replays showed only a brief puff of tire smoke from Dana's car before impact, the only indication that he had attempted to slow before the crash.

“This was the first time this weekend that we’d had all 20 cars on the track at the same time,“ Barnhart said. “Ed had his problem in Turn 2 initially. The yellow lights were called immediately and all systems functioned properly. It’s just a busy time out there with a lot of cars and a lot of traffic.”

Dana, a 30-year-old native of St. Louis, is survived by his wife, Tonya. A graduate of the Northwestern University school of journalism, Dana covered racing for magazines before pursuing his racing career. He was seriously injured last year during a practice session before the Indianapolis 500 in a Hemelgarn Racing entry. He sat out the rest of the season to recover from the injuries before joining Rahal Letterman for the 2006 season.

Barnhart said he spoke with officials of International Speedway Corporation, which owns the track, and with track president Curtis Gray before deciding to continue with Sunday's race as scheduled at 3:45 p.m. ET. “We‘re all in agreement that the race will go on as scheduled today, on time,” Barnhart said.

The crash was the first fatal incident in the IRL since Tony Renna was killed in October 2003 during a test session at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

UPDATE: All scans and tests on Carpenter have come back negative from the hospital. He's being held overnight at Jackson Memorial Hospital for observation. Stable condition.


Here's another thread by Robin Miller:

www.speedtv.com/commentary/22748/

The Sad, Cold Truth
Written by: Robin Miller
Homestead, FL – 3/26/2006

With all due respect to the deceased and his family, Paul Dana was in over his head; the victim of a system where people have been buying rides at the highest level for more than 25 years.

A few weeks ago in an Indianapolis gym, Paul Dana was working out and we began talking about his return to racing and, in particular, his place in racing.

"You don't think I belong in an Indy car do you?," he asked. "I know you don't and you're entitled to your opinion but I think this is the year I'll prove to everybody that I do."

Dana will never get that chance. He lost his life here Sunday morning in an accident that more or less confirmed he was out of his depth at 200 mph. Some eight seconds after Ed Carpenter hit the wall in first minutes of practice, Dana roared onto the scene running wide open.

The replay shows five or six cars passed Carpenter's car before Dana drilled it at 176 mph with a shattering impact.

"I was hard on the brake and downshifting when I saw this blur go by me on the left," said veteran Scott Sharp, who reacted to the yellow light and his spotter's command to slow down.

Why Dana didn't slow down remained a mystery long after the Indy Racing League season opener at Homestead-Miami Speedway had finished. IRL and Rahal Letterman team officials said there was no communication problem with track lights or the spotter.

The best explanation was also the coldest.

"He just didn't know what the hell he was doing," said a former Indy 500 winner.

It's harsh to critique a young man's actions a few hours after he's passed on but unfortunately Dana is an example of what's happened to open wheel racing at this level.

The 30-year-old native of St. Louis was a likeable journalism grad from Northwestern with a passion for auto racing. He began competing in small formula cars in the late '90s, when he was also covering the CART series for Autoweek.

Now think about that for just a minute, He was writing about Michael Andretti and Al Unser Jr. for a national magazine and, next month, he was going to be competing against them at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

That kind of Walter Mitty scenario cannot happen in baseball, basketball, football, hockey or golf. You've got to earn a place on the roster, you just can't walk up and buy your way onto a foursome with Tiger Woods at Augusta.

But people have been buying rides at the highest level of American open wheel racing for more than 25 years.

In USAC's glory days of the '50s-'60s-'70s, it was damn tough to get a national big car license, as it was called. A driver had to spend a few years in midgets or sprints, then run Trenton, Phoenix and Milwaukee in an Indy car and then be "nominated" by a USAC star in order to be allowed to take his ROOKIE TEST at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It was a tough screening process but it kept the field at Indy a lot closer to the 33 best drivers than it does nowadays.

Dana didn't replace Vitor Meira on Rahal's team because he was a better driver, he simply brought money in the form of sponsor Ethanol. In today's sorry economy for IRL and Champ Car, Rahal needed to bring Dana on board to keep his three-car team solvent.

Paul Dana certainly wasn't the first or the worst to ever buy his way into an Indy car. We've seen Patrick Bedard, Dale Whittington, Jack Miller, Paul Jasper, Dennis Vitolo, Randy Lewis, Lyn St, James .... there's a long list of people who were much better at marketing than they were at driving.

And, truth be told, Dana followed protocol to the letter. He spent two years in the IRL's Pro Series, won a race and a pole position and finished second in the point standings. Of course the IPS and it's wide open formula and small fields is hardly a yardstick for determining talent.

But it's the stepladder series to Indy cars and the IRL couldn't deny Dana a chance to pursue his dream of competing in the Indy 500. Not even after he crashed last May while practicing for the Indy 500. He'd worked hard and hustled a nice sponsorship in Ethanol.

The bottom line of this tragedy is that it could not have been prevented, not in today's scheme of things in open wheel. Dana, who had qualified 9th for Sunday's IRL opener, wasn't a hopeless hazard that had everybody totally terrified to run next to him.

Having said that, the majority of veterans were wary of Dana's pedigree. He lacked the miles of high speed experience necessary to drive one of those IRL missiles in close quarters. And those instincts that come with miles, like looking down the track for trouble.

The general feeling in the IRL paddock was that Paul Dana was a nice kid with a driving passion who was over the moon to be running an Indy car. And also over his head. Sadly, they both were true.

The opinions reflected herein are solely those of the above commentator and are not necessarily those of SpeedTV.com, FOX, NewsCorp, or Speed Channel


Mike

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:46:00 AM EDT
Well then i stand corrected. My appologies to the spotter any anyone else i have offeneded. I was wrong.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:58:56 AM EDT
Days of Thunder'itis?

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:17:13 AM EDT
Not a good way to start a season. Prayers sent to Dana family.

I was a little irritated today to see the crash on Television. I don't remember the media replaying a fatal crash prior to Dale. They showed that crash a thousand times, for months it seemed like. I think it is in very poor taste, and disrespectful to the family. I guess the taboo was broken, and it is considered OK now.



On the other hand, I saw the last 30 laps or so. It looked like good racing. I hope this season turns out well.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:32:38 AM EDT
I can't find video of the crash anywhere.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:34:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
OK.. I found a straight link to the video of the wreck..poor bastard didn't even touch the brakes

sports.espn.go.com/rpm/news/story?seriesId=1&id=2384873



I saw the front end of Dana's car dip to the point of hitting skid plates on the track. You can see sparks BEFORE the impact even on low res TV. High def shows brake-induced dipping of the front end.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:30:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By efpeter:
Not a good way to start a season. Prayers sent to Dana family.

I was a little irritated today to see the crash on Television. I don't remember the media replaying a fatal crash prior to Dale. They showed that crash a thousand times, for months it seemed like. I think it is in very poor taste, and disrespectful to the family. I guess the taboo was broken, and it is considered OK now.



On the other hand, I saw the last 30 laps or so. It looked like good racing. I hope this season turns out well.



Yep, it is a shame that they have decided agaist that policy. (it might not have been official policy, but I don't remember seeing any replayed either, I also never saw the footage of people getting the blue tarps or getting cut out until after Dale got killed.)
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:32:29 AM EDT
burbanite, can a throttle stick on an Indycar?
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:33:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
I can't find video of the crash anywhere.



Look on page 1 about 4 or 5 posts down.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:37:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 10:41:54 AM EDT by VoodooChile]

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
I can't find video of the crash anywhere.



Look on page 1 about 4 or 5 posts down.



If that's the link I posted the day of the crash it doesn't show the crash anymore..I was fixin to b-smack John_Wayne until I checked.

ETA: go here and click on the upper right hand side

www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-irl27mar27,1,2758110.story?coll=la-headlines-sports
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:48:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By efpeter:
Not a good way to start a season. Prayers sent to Dana family.

I was a little irritated today to see the crash on Television. I don't remember the media replaying a fatal crash prior to Dale. They showed that crash a thousand times, for months it seemed like. I think it is in very poor taste, and disrespectful to the family. I guess the taboo was broken, and it is considered OK now.



On the other hand, I saw the last 30 laps or so. It looked like good racing. I hope this season turns out well.



Yep, it is a shame that they have decided agaist that policy. (it might not have been official policy, but I don't remember seeing any replayed either, I also never saw the footage of people getting the blue tarps or getting cut out until after Dale got killed.)




They usally hide it pretty good and reflect more on the drivers life. No one wants to see the tarps and I dont ever remember seeing much of Greg Moores (1999) accident after it happened, or even Senna's (1994) Bonnett (1994)
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:56:36 AM EDT
We will just have to see what went wrong after a thorough investigation. I certainly don'w want to see anyone get hurt, but going 200+MPH, there are some risks. Me, personally, I will be willing to bet that in the excitement of the race all, Dana forgot about the warning issued by the spotter.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 11:01:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
I can't find video of the crash anywhere.



Look on page 1 about 4 or 5 posts down.



If that's the link I posted the day of the crash it doesn't show the crash anymore..I was fixin to b-smack John_Wayne until I checked.

ETA: go here and click on the upper right hand side

www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-irl27mar27,1,2758110.story?coll=la-headlines-sports



oops....guess I should have checked
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 11:36:07 AM EDT
Paul hit some debris several car lengths before impacting Carpenter. That very easily could have affected his ability to steer and/or brake. I saw a report where impact occurred at around 175 mph, so he had to slow some. Also, at the time of Carpenter's spin coming out of T2, Paul was probably back in T1 or even on the front straight. He also was dicing with some cars on his outside who ended up slowing at the time the Yellow was thrown.

I know track, league and team officials claim all was well with calling the track yellow and making notifications. I don't know of any report that confirms Paul received and reacted to these notifications in a timely manner, i.e., did the spotter hear him confirm that he realized the track was yellow. It does seem as if he continued at speed for a couple of additional seconds after other cars began slowing. Whether or not he realized the track was yellow, we'll probably never know.

About throttles sticking, they most definitely can, but I'm not aware of any report that confirms this was the case here. A couple of years ago Gil Deferran was involved in a wreck and when he came to a rest against the wall his rear axle was elevated and was clearly still under power. He was knocked unconscious so he couldn't kill the ignition. The safety worker had to be crapping his pants going over to him with this rear tire spinning like that -- if that car would have fallen and if the tire would have hooked up, it could have been the end for the worker. luckily the worker was able to kill the ignition before that happened.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 12:59:09 PM EDT
My company was one of his sponsors for last year's Indy 500.
Unfortunately, he hit a wall in practice and came to our suite with a full torso brace. He was replaced by another driver. Nice guy, he hung around to answer questions and sign autographs.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 1:19:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
burbanite, can a throttle stick on an Indycar?



Unlikely. If a mechanical event occurs, (cable, pedal, linkage etc), then there is an in-line sensor that picks this up and the ECU immediately goes to idle status. Since this was adopted several years ago I have not heard of one instance where a throttle has "stuck".
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 1:26:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By chapperjoe:
Heard he left a wife behind too. RIP.



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